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Learning about LTO and Premiere workflows

By Chelsea Taylor

In late March, I attended a workflow event by Facilis Technology and StorageDNA in New York City. I didn’t know much going in other than it would be about collaborative workflows and shared storage for Adobe Premiere. While this event was likely set up to sell some systems, I did end up learning some worthwhile information about archiving and backup.

Full disclosure: going into this event I knew very little about LTO archiving. Previously I had been archiving all of my projects by throwing a hard drive into the corner of my edit. Well, not really but close! It seems that a lot of companies out there don’t put too much importance on archiving until after it becomes a problem (“All of our edits are crashing and we don’t know why!”).

At my last editing job where we edited short form content on Avid, our media manager would consolidate projects in Avid, create a FileMaker database that cataloged footage, manually add metadata, then put the archived files onto different G-Tech G-RAID drives (which of course could die after a couple of years). In short, it wasn’t the best way to archive and backup media, especially when an editor wanted to find something. They would have to walk over to the computer where the database was, figure out how to use the UI, search for the project (If it had the right metadata), find the physical drive, plug the drive into their machine, go through different files/folders until they found what they were looking for, copy the however many large files to the SAN, and then start working. Suffice to say I had a lot to learn about archiving and was very excited to attend this event.

I arrived at the event about 30 minutes early, which turned out to be a good thing because I was immediately greeted by some of the experts and presenters from Facilis and StorageDNA. Not fully realizing who I was talking to, I started asking tons of questions about their products. What does StorageDNA do? How can it integrate with Premiere? Why is LTO tape archiving better? Who adds the metadata? How fast can you access the backup? And before I knew it, I was in a heated discussion with Jeff Krueger, worldwide VP of sales at StorageDNA, and Doug Hynes, director of product and solution marketing at StorageDNA, about their products and the importance of archiving. Fully inspired to archive and with tons more questions, our conversation got cut short as the event was about to begin.

While the Facilis offerings look cool (I want all of them!), I wasn’t at the event to buy things — I wanted to hear about the workflow and integration with Adobe Premiere (which is a language I better understand). As someone who would be actually using these products and not in charge of buying them, I didn’t care about the tech specs or new features. “Secure sharing with permissions. Low-level media management. Block-level virtualized storage pools.” It was hardware spec after hardware spec (which you can check out on their website). As the presenter spoke of the new features and specifications of their new models, I just kept thinking about what Jeff Krueger had told me right before the event about archiving, which I will share with you here.

StorageDNA presented on a product line called DNAevolution, which is an archive engine built on LTO tapes. Each model provides different levels of LTO automation, LTO drives and server hardware. As an editor, I was more concerned with the workflow.

The StorageDNA Workflow for Premiere
1. Card contents are ingested onto the SAN.
2. The high-res files are written to LTO/ LTFS through DNAevolution and become permanent camera master files.
3. Low-res proxies are created and ingested onto the SAN for use in editorial. DNAevolution is pointed to the proxies, indexes them and links to the high-res clips on LTO.
4. Once the files are written to and verified on LTO, you can delete the high-res files from your spinning disk storage.
5. The editor works with the low-res proxies in Premiere Pro.
6. When complete, the editor exports an EDL that DNAevolution parses and locates the high-res files on LTO from the database.
7. DNAevolution restores high-res files to the finishing station or SAN storage.
8. The editor can relink the media and distribute in high-res/4K.

The StorageDNA Archive Workflow
1. In the DNAevolution Archive Console, select your Premiere Pro project file.
2. DNAevolution scans the project, and generates a list of files to be archived. It then writes all associated media files and the project itself to LTO tape(s).
3. Once the files are written to and verified on LTO, you can delete the high-res files from your spinning disk storage.

Why I Was impressed
All of your media is immediately backed up, ensuring it is in a safe place and not taking up your local or shared storage. You can delete the high-res files from your SAN storage immediately and work with proxies, onlining later down the line. The problem I’ve had with SAN storage is that it fills up very quickly with large files, eventually slowing down your systems and leading to playback problems. Why have all of your RAW unused media just sitting there eating up your valuable space when you can free it up immediately?

DNAevolution works easily with Adobe’s Premiere, Prelude and Media Encoder. It uses the Adobe CC toolset to automate the process of creating LTO/LTFS camera masters while creating previews via Media Encoder.

DNAevolution archives all media from your Premiere projects with a single click and notifies you if files are missing. It also checks your files for existing camera and clip metadata. Meaning if you add all of that in at the start it will make archiving much easier.

You have direct access to files on LTO tape, enabling third-party applications access to media directly on LTO, such as transcoding, partial restore and playout. DNAevolution’s Archive Asset Management toolset allows you to browse/search archived content and provides proxy playback. It even has a drag and drop functionality with Premiere where you literally drop a file straight from the archive into your Premiere timeline, with little rendering, and start editing.

I have never tested an LTO archive workflow and am curious what other people’s experiences have been like. Feel free to leave your thoughts on LTO vs. Cloud vs. Disk in the comments below.

Chelsea Taylor is a freelance editor who has worked on a wide range of content: from viral videos and sizzles to web series and short films. She also works as an assistant editor on feature films and documentaries. Check out her site a at StillRenderingProductions.com.

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