IBC 2016: VR and 8K will drive M&E storage demand

By Tom Coughlin

While attending the 2016 IBC show, I noticed some interesting trends, cool demos and new offerings. For example, while flying drones were missing, VR goggles were everywhere; IBM was showing 8K video editing using flash memory and magnetic tape; the IBC itself featured a fully IP-based video studio showing the path to future media production using lower-cost commodity hardware with software management; and, it became clear that digital technology is driving new entertainment experiences and will dictate the next generation of content distribution, including the growing trend to OTT channels.

In general, IBC 2016 featured the move to higher resolution and more immersive content. On display throughout the show was 360-degree video for virtual reality, as well as 4K and 8K workflows. Virtual reality and 8K are driving new levels of performance and storage demand, and these are just some of the ways that media and entertainment pros are future-zone-2increasing the size of video files. Nokia’s Ozo was just one of several multi-camera content capture devices on display for 360-degree video.

Besides multi-camera capture technology and VR editing, the Future Tech Zone at IBC included even larger 360-degree video display spheres than at the 2015 event. These were from Puffer Fish (pictured right). The smaller-sized spherical display was touch-sensitive so you could move your hand across the surface and cause the display to move (sadly, I didn’t get to try the big sphere).

IBM had a demonstration of a 4K/8K video editing workflow using the IBM FlashSystem and IBM Enterprise tape storage technology, which was a collaboration between the IBM Tokyo Laboratory and IBM’s Storage Systems division. This work was done to support the move to 4K/8K broadcasts in Japan by 2018, with a broadcast satellite and delivery of 8K video streams of the 2020 Tokyo Olympic Games. The combination of flash memory storage for working content and tape for inactive content is referred to as FLAPE (flash and tAPE).

The graphic below shows a schematic of the 8K video workflow demonstration.

The argument for FLAPE appears to be that flash performance is needed for editing 8K content and the magnetic tape provides low-cost storage the 8K content, which may require greater than 18TB for an hour of raw content (depending upon the sampling and frame rate). Note that magnetic tape is often used for archiving of video content, so this is a rather unusual application. The IBM demonstration, plus discussions with media and entertainment professionals at IBC indicate that with the declining costs of flash memory and the performance demands of 8K, 8K workflows may finally drive increased demand for flash memory for post production.

Avid was promoting their Nexis file system, the successor to ISIS. The company uses SSDs for metadata, but generally flash isn’t used for actual editing yet. They agreed that as flash costs drop, flash could find a role for higher resolution and richer media. Avid has embraced open source for their code and provides free APIs for their storage. The company sees a hybrid of on-site and cloud storage for many media and entertainment applications.

EditShare announced a significant update to its XStream EFS Shared Storage Platform (our main image). The update provides non-disruptive scaling to over 5PB with millions of assets in a single namespace. The system provides a distributed file system with multiple levels of hardware redundancy and reduced downtime. An EFS cluster can be configured with a mix of capacity and performance with SSDs for high data rate content and SATA HDD for cost-efficient higher-performance storage — 8TB HDDs have been qualified for the system. The latest release expands optimization support for file-per-frame media.

The IBC IP Interoperability Zone was showing a complete IP-based studio (pictured right) was done with the cooperation of AIMS and the IABM. The zone brings to life the work of the JT-NM (the Joint Task Force on Networked Media, a combined initiative of AMWA, EBU, SMPTE and VSF) and the AES on a common roadmap for IP interoperability. Central to the IBC Feature Area was a live production studio, based on the technologies of the JT-NM roadmap that Belgian broadcaster VRT has been using daily on-air all this summer as part of the LiveIP Project, which is a collaboration between VRT, the European Broadcasting Union (EBU) and LiveIP’s 12 technology partners.

Summing Up
IBC 2016 showed some clear trends to more immersive, richer content with the numerous displays of 360-degree and VR content and many demonstrations of 4K and even 8K workflows. Clearly, the trend is for higher-capacity, higher-performance workflows and storage systems that support this workflow. This is leading to a gradual move to use flash memory to support these workflows as the costs for flash go down. At the same time, the move to IP-based equipment will lead to lower-cost commodity hardware with software control.

Storage analyst Tom Coughlin is president of Coughlin Associates. He has over 30 years in the data storage industry and is the author of Digital Storage in Consumer Electronics: The Essential Guide. He also  publishes the Digital Storage Technology Newsletter, the Digital Storage in Media and Entertainment Report.


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