Category Archives: VR

Director Ava DuVernay named VES Summit’s keynote speaker

Director/producer/writer Ava DuVernay has been named keynote speaker at the 2017 VES Summit, “Inspiring Change: Building on 20 Years of VES Innovation.” The forum, which takes place Saturday, October 28, celebrates the Visual Effects Society’s 20th anniversary and brings together creatives, executives and visionaries from a variety of disciplines to discuss the evolution of visual imagery and the VFX industry landscape in a TED Talks-like atmosphere.

At the 2012 Sundance Film Festival, DuVernay won the Best Director Prize for her second feature film Middle of Nowhere, which she also wrote and produced. For her work on Selma in 2014, she was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Picture. In 2017, she was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Documentary Feature for her film 13th. Her current directorial work includes the dramatic television series Queen Sugar, and the upcoming Disney feature film A Wrinkle in Time.

It was back in 2010 that DuVernay made her directorial debut with the acclaimed 2008 hip-hop documentary This Is The Life, and she has gone on to direct several network documentaries, including Venus Vs. for ESPN. She has also directed significant short form work, including August 28: A Day in the Life of a People, commissioned by The Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture, as well as fashion and beauty films for Prada and Apple.

Other speakers include:
–  Syd Mead, visual futurist and conceptual artist
–  President of IMAX Home Entertainment Jason Brenek on “Evolution in Entertainment: VR, Cinema and Beyond”
– CEO of SSP BlueHemanshu Nigam on “When Hackers Attack: How Can Hollywood Fight Back?”
– Head of Adobe Research Gavin Miller on “Will the Future Look More Like Harry Potter or Star Trek?”
–  Senior research engineer at Autodesk, Evan Atherton on “The Age of Imagination”
–  Founder/CEO of the Emblematic Group, Nonny de la Peña on “Creating for Virtual, Augmented and Mixed Realities”

Additional speakers and roundtable moderators will be announced soon. The 2017 VES Summit takes place at the Sofitel Hotel Beverly Hills.

Review: Blackmagic’s Fusion 9

By David Cox

At Siggraph in August, Blackmagic Design released a new version of its compositing software Fusion. For those not familiar with Fusion, it is a highly flexible node-based compositor that can composite in 2D and 3D spaces. Its closest competitor is Nuke from The Foundry.

The raft of new updates in Version 9 could be categorized into one of two areas: features created in response to user requests, and a set of tools for VR. Also announced with the new release is a price drop to $299 for the full studio version, which, judging by global resellers instantly running out of stock (Fusion ships via dongle), seems to have been a popular move!

As with other manufacturers in the film and broadcast area, the term “VR” is a little misused as they are really referring to “360 video.” VR, although a more exciting term, would demand interactivity. That said, as a post production suite for 360 video, Fusion already has a very strong tool set. It can create, manipulate, texture and light 3D scenes made from imported CGI models and built-in primitives and particles.

Added in Version 9 is a spherical camera that can capture a scene as a 360 2D or stereo 3D image. In addition, new tools are provided to cross-convert between many 360 video image formats. Another useful tool allows a portion of a 360-degree image to be unwrapped (or un-distorted) so that restoration or compositing work can be easily carried out on it before it is perfectly re-wrapped back into the 360-degree image.

There is also a new stabilizer for 360 wrap-around shots. A neat feature is that Fusion 9 can directly drive VR headsets such as Oculus Rift. Within Fusion, any node can be routed to any viewing monitor and the VR headset simply presents itself as an extra one of those.

Notably, Blackmagic has opted not to tackle 360-degree image stitching — the process by which images from multiple cameras facing in different directions are “stitched” together to form a single wrap-around view. I can understand this — on one hand, there are numerous free or cheap apps that perform stitching and so there’s no need for Blackmagic to reinvent that wheel. On the other hand, Blackmagic targets the mass user area, and given that 360 video production is a niche activity, productions that strap together multiple cameras form an even smaller and decreasing niche due to the growing number of single-step 360-degree cameras that provide complete wrap-around images without the need for stitching.

Moving on from VR/360, Fusion 9 now boasts some very significant additional features. While some Fusion users had expressed concerned that Blackmagic was favoring Resolve, in fact it is now clear that the Fusion development team have been very busy indeed.

Camera Tracker
First up is an embedded camera tracker and solver. Such a facility aims to deduce how the original camera in a live-action shoot moved through the scene and what lens must have been on it. From this, a camera tracker produces a virtual 3D scene into which a compositor can add objects that then move precisely with the original shot.

Fusion 9’s new camera tracker performed well in tests. It requires the user to break the process down into three logical steps: track, refine and export. Fusion initially offers auto-placed trackers, which follow scores of details in the scene quite quickly. The operator then removes any obviously silly trackers (like the ones chasing around the moving people in a scene) and sets Fusion about the task of “solving” the camera move.

Once done, Fusion presents a number of features to allow the user to measure the accuracy of the resulting track and to locate and remove trackers that are adversely affecting that result. This is a circular process by which the user can incrementally improve the track. The final track is then converted into a 3D scene with a virtual camera and a point cloud to show where the trackers would exist in 3D space. A ground plane is also provided, which the user can locate during the tracking process.

While Fusion 9’s camera tracker perhaps doesn’t have all the features of a dedicated 3D tracker such as SynthEyes from Andersson Technologies, it does satisfy the core need and has plenty of controls to ensure that the tool is flexible enough to deal with most scenarios. It will certainly be received as a welcome addition.

Planar Tracker
Next up is a built-in “planar” tracker. Planar trackers work differently than classic point trackers, which simply try to follow a small area of detail. A planar tracker follows a larger area of a shot, which makes up a flat plane — such as a wall or table top. From this, the planar tracker can deduce rotation, location, scale and perspective.

Fusion 9 Studio’s new planar tracker also performed well in tests. It assessed the track quickly and was not easily upset by foreground objects obscuring parts of the tracked area. The resulting track can either be used directly to insert another image into the resulting plane or to stabilize the shot, or indirectly by producing a separate Planar Transform node. This is used to warp any other asset such as a matte for rotoscoping work.

Inevitably, any planar tracker will be compared to the long-established “daddy” of them all, Mocha Pro from Boris FX. At a basic level, Fusion’s planar tracker worked just as well as Mocha, creating solid tracks from a user-defined area nicely and quickly. However, I would think that for complex rotoscoping, where a user will have many roto layers, driven by many tracking sources, with other layers acting as occlusion masks, Mocha’s working environment would be easier to control. Such a task would lead to many, many wired up nodes in Fusion, whereas Mocha would present the same functions within a simper layer-list. Of course, Mocha Pro is available as an OFX plug-in for Fusion Studio anyway, so users can have the best of both worlds.

Delta Keyer
Blackmagic also added a new keyer to Fusion called the Delta Keyer. It is a color difference keyer with a wide range of controls to refine the resulting matte and the edges of the key. It worked well when tested against one of my horrible greenscreens, something I keep for these very occasions!

The Delta Keyer can also take a clean plate as a reference input, which is essentially a frame of the green/bluescreen studio without the object to be keyed. The Delta Keyer then uses this to understand which deviations from the screen color represent the foreground object and which are just part of an uneven screen color.

To assist with this process, there is also a new Clean Plate node, which is designed to create an estimate of a clean plate in the absence of one being available from the shoot (for example, if the camera was moving). The combination of the clean plate and the Delta Keyer produced good results when challenged to extract subtle object shadows from an unevenly lit greenscreen shot.

Studio Player
Studio Player is also new for Fusion 9 Studio; it’s a multi-station shot review tool. Multiple versions of clips and comps can be added to the Studio Player’s single layer timeline, where simple color adjustments and notes can be added. A neat feature is that multiple studio players in different locations can be slaved together so that cross-facility review sessions can take place, with everyone looking at the same thing at the same time, which helps!

Fusion 9 Studio also supports the writing of Apple-approved Pro Res from all its supported platforms, including Windows and Linux. Yep – you read that right. Other format support has also been widened and improved, such as faster native handling for DNxHR codecs, for example.

Summing Up
All in all, the updates to Fusion 9 are comprehensive and very much in line with what professional users have been asking for. I think it certainly demonstrates that Blackmagic is as committed to Fusion as Resolve, and at $299, it’s a no-brainer for any professional VFX artist to have available to them.

Of course, the price drop shows that Blackmagic is also aiming Fusion squarely at the mass independent filmmaker market. Certainly, with Resolve and Fusion, those users will have pretty much all the post tools they will need.

Fusion by its nature and heritage is a more complex beast to learn than Resolve, but it is well supported with a good user manual, forums and video tutorials. I would think it likely that for this market, Fusion might benefit from some minor tweaks to make it more intuitive in certain areas. I also think the join between Resolve and Fusion will provide a lot of interest going forward for this market. Adobe has done a masterful job bridging Premiere and After Effects. The join between Resolve and Fusion is more rudimentary, but if Blackmagic gets this right, they will have a killer combination.

Finally, Fusion 9 extends what was already a very powerful and comprehensive compositing suite. It has become my primary compositing device and the additions in version 9 only serve to cement that position.


David Cox is a VFX compositor and colorist with 20+ years experience. He started his career with MPC and The Mill before forming his own London-based post facility. Cox recently created interactive projects with full body motion sensors and 4D/AR experiences.

Dell 6.15

Charlieuniformtango adds director Elliot Dillman to roster

Director Elliot Dillman has joined Charlieuniformtango for national commercial and VR representation. His directorial experience spans broadcast commercials, branded VR content, music videos and multi-camera live events.

He has been at the helm of national ad campaigns for a number of top agencies including GSD&M, CP+B, Leo Burnett, Y&R and BBDO, directing spots for brands such as Kraft, Nerf, GMC and Subway.

Recently, Dillman’s work with Verizon and Momentum Worldwide received two 2017 Clio Awards for the “Virtual Gridiron” VR experience at Super Bowl LI. Also, his short film, “In Harmony,” part of the Oculus VR for Good program, premiered at the Oculus house during the 2017 Sundance Film Festival and was an official selection of SXSW 2017. The film examines the Harmony Project’s work to help Los Angeles kids stay in school through educational music programs. “

Dillman is the oldest son of Emmy-winning director Ray Dillman, so he grew up on film sets. He started working regularly as a PA at age 12 for production companies like Gartner and MJZ. While studying at Loyola Marymount University’s School of Film and Television, Dillman simultaneously began his directing career with multi-camera live concert shoots for the ESPN Summer and Winter X Games. Shortly after graduating, he directed feature film tie-in spots for Sony Pictures, Warner Bros. and Paramount, along with ad campaigns for the Walt Disney Company and Royal Purple Motor Oil, amongst others.


Review: Lenovo’s ThinkPad P71 mobile workstation

By Mike McCarthy

Lenovo was nice enough to send me their newest VR-enabled mobile workstation to test out on a VR workflow project I am doing. The new ThinkPad P71 is a beast with a 17-inch UHD IPS screen. The model they sent to me was equipped with the fastest available processor, a Xeon E5-1535M v6 with four cores processing eight threads at an official speed of 3.1GHz. It has 32GB of DDR4-2400 ECC RAM, with two more slots allowing that to be doubled to 64GB if desired.

The system’s headline feature is the Nvidia Quadro P5000 mobile GPU, with 2,048 CUDA cores, fed by another 16GB of dedicated DDR5 memory. The storage configuration is a single NVMe 1TB SSD populating one of two available M.2 slots. This configuration is currently available for $5,279, discounted to $4,223.20 on Lenovo.com right now. So while it is not cheap, it is one of the most powerful mobile workstations you can buy right now.

Connectivity wise, it has dual Thunderbolt 3 ports, which can also be used for USB 3.1 Type C devices. It has four more USB 3.1 Type A ports and a Gigabit Ethernet port. You have a number of options for display connectivity. Besides the Thunderbolt ports, there is a MiniDP 1.2 port and an HDMI 1.4 port (1.4 based on Intel graphics limitations). It has an SDXC slot, an ExpressCard34 slot, and a single 1/8-inch headphone mic combo jack. The system also has a docking connector and a rectangular port for the included 230W power adaptor.

It has the look and feel of a traditional ThinkPad, which goes back to the days when they were made by IBM. It has the customary TrackPoint as well as a touchpad. Both have three mouse buttons, which I like in theory, but I constantly find myself trying to click with the center button to no avail. I would either have to get used to it, or set the center action to click as well, defeating the purpose of the third button. The Fn key in the bottom corner will take some getting used to as well, as I keep hitting that instead of CTRL, but I adapted to a similar configuration on my current laptop.

I didn’t like the combo jack at first, because it required a cheap adapter, but now that I have gotten one, I see why that is the future, once all the peripherals support it. I had plugged my mic and headphones in backwards as recently as last week, so it is an issue when the ports aren’t clearly labeled and the combo jack solves that once and for all. It is a similar jack to most cell phones, and you only need an adapter for the mic functionality, regular headphones work by default.

The system doesn’t weigh as much as I expected, probably due to the lack of spinning disks or optical drive, which can be added if desired. It came relatively clean, with Windows 10 Pro installed, without too many other applications or utilities pre-installed. It had all of the needed drivers and a simple utility for operating the integrated X-Rite Pantone color calibrator for the screen. There was a utility for adding any other applications that would normally be included, which I used to download the Lenovo Performance Tuner. I use the Performance Tuner more for monitoring usage than adjusting settings, but can be nice to have everything in one place, especially in Windows 10.

The system boots up in about 10 seconds, and shuts down even faster. Hibernating takes twice as long, which is to be expected with that much RAM to be cached to disk, even with an NVMe SSD. But that may be worth the extra time to keep your applications open. My initial tests of the SSD showed a 1700MB/s write speed with 2500MB/s reads. Longer endurance tests resulted in write speeds decreasing to 1200MB/s, but the read speeds remained consistently above 2500MB/s. That should be more than enough throughput for most media work, even allowing me to playback uncompressed 6K content, and should allow 4K uncompressed media capture if you connect an I/O device to the Thunderbolt bus.

The main application I use on a daily basis is Adobe Premiere Pro, so most of my performance evaluation revolves around that program, although I used a few others as well. I was able to load a full feature film off of a USB3 drive with no issues. The 6K Cineform and DNxHR media played back at ½ res without issue. The 6K R3D files played at ¼ res without dropping frames, which is comparable to my big tower.

My next playback test was fairly unique to my workflow, but a good benchmark of what is possible. I was able to connect three 1080p televisions to the MiniDP port, using an MST (Multi-Stream Transport) hub, with three HDMI ports. Using the Nvidia Mosaic functionality offered by the Quadro P5000 card, I can span them into a single display, which Premiere can send output to, via the Adobe’s Mercury Playback engine. This configuration allows me to playback 6K DNxHR 444 files to all three screens, directly off the timeline, at half res, without dropping frames. My 6K H.265 files playback at full res outside Premiere. That is a pretty impressive display for a laptop. Once I had maxed out the possibilities for playback, I measured a few encodes. In general, the P71 takes about twice as long to encode things in Adobe Media Encoder as my 20-core desktop workstation, but is twice as fast as my existing quad Core i7 4860 laptop.

The other application I have been taxing my system with recently is DCP-O-Matic. It takes 30 hours to render my current movie to a 4K DCP on my desktop, which is 18x the runtime, but I know most of my system’s 20 cores are sitting idle based on the software threading. Doing a similar encode on the Lenovo system took 12.5x the run time, so that means my 100-minute film should take 21 hours. The higher base frequency of the quad core CPU definitely makes a difference in this instance.

The next step was to try my HMD headset with it to test out the VR capability. My Oculus Rift installed without issues, which is saying something, based on the peculiarities of Oculus’ software. Maybe there is something to that “VR-ready” program, but I did frequently have issues booting up the system with the Rift connected, so I recommend plugging it in after you have your system up and running. Everything VR-related ran great, except for the one thing I actually wanted to do, which was edit 360 video in Premiere, with the HMD. There was some incompatibility between the drivers for the laptop and the software. (Update: Setting the graphics system to Discrete instead of Hybrid in the BIOS solves this problem. This solution works with both PPro11’s Skybox Player, and PPro12’s new SteamVR based approach.)

There are a variety of ways to test battery life, but since this is a VR-ready system that seemed to be the best approach. How long would it support using a VR headset before needing to plug in? I got just short of an hour of heavy 3D VR usage before I started getting low battery warnings. I was hoping to be able to close the display to save power, since I am not looking at it while using the headset. (I usually set the Close Lid action to Do Nothing on all my systems because I want to be able to walk into the other room to show someone something on my timeline without effecting the application. If I want to sleep the system, I can press the button.) But whenever the Rift is active, closing the lid puts the machine to sleep immediately, regardless of the settings. So you have to run the display and the HMD anytime you are working in VR. And don’t plan on doing extensive work without plugging in.

Now to be fair, setting up to use VR involves preparing the environment and configuring sensors, so adding power to that mix is a reasonable requirement and very similar to 3D gaming. Portable doesn’t always mean untethered. But for browsing the Internet, downloading project files and editing articles, I would expect about four hours of battery life from the system before needing to recharge. It is really hard to accurately estimate run time when the system’s performance and power needs scale so much depending on the user’s activities. The GPU alone scales from 5 watts to 100 watts depending on what is being processed, but the run time is not out of line with what is to be expected from products in this class of performance.

Summing Up
All in all, the P71 is an impressive piece of equipment, and one of only a few ways you can currently get a portable professional VR solution. I recognize that most of my applications aren’t using all of the power I would be carrying around in a P71, so for my own work, I would probably hope to find a smaller and lighter-weight system at the expense of some of that processing power. But for people who have uncompromising needs for the fastest system they can possibly get, the Lenovo P71 fits the bill. It is a solid performer that can do an impressive amount of processing, while still being able to come with you wherever you need to go.


Mike McCarthy is an online editor/workflow consultant with 10 years of experience on feature films and commercials. He has been working on new solutions for tapeless workflows, DSLR filmmaking and multi-screen and surround video experiences. Check out his site.


postPerspective Impact Award winners from SIGGRAPH 2017

Last April, postPerspective announced the debut of our Impact Awards, celebrating innovative products and technologies for the post production and production industries that will influence the way people work. We are now happy to present our second set of Impact Awards, celebrating the outstanding offerings presented at SIGGRAPH 2017.

Now that the show is over, and our panel of VFX/VR/post pro judges has had time to decompress, dig out and think about what impressed them, we are happy to announce our honorees.

And the winners of the postPerspective Impact Award from SIGGRAPH 2017 are:

  • Faceware Technologies for Faceware Live 2.5
  • Maxon for Cinema 4D R19
  • Nvidia for OptiX 5.0  

“All three of these technologies are very worthy recipients of our first postPerspective Impact Awards from SIGGRAPH,” said Randi Altman, postPerspective’s founder and editor-in-chief. “These awards celebrate companies that define the leading-edge of technology while producing tools that actually make users’ working lives easier and projects better, and our winners certainly fall into that category.

“While SIGGRAPH’s focus is on VFX, animation, VR/AR and the like, the types of gear they have on display vary. Some are suited for graphics and animation, while others have uses that slide into post production. We’ve tapped real-world users in these areas to vote for our Impact Awards, and they have determined what tools might be most impactful to their day-to-day work. That’s what makes our awards so special.”

There were many new technologies and products at SIGGRAPH this year, and while only three won an Impact Award, our judges felt there were other updates that it was important to let people know about as well.

Blackmagic Design’s Fusion 9 was certainly turning heads and Nvidia’s VRWorks 360 Video was called out as well. Chaos Group also caught our judges attention with V-Ray for Unreal Engine 4.

Stay tuned for future Impact Award winners in the coming months — voted on by users for users — from IBC.


Quick Look: Jaunt One’s 360 camera

By Claudio Santos

To those who have been following the virtual reality market from the beginning, one very interesting phenomenon is how the hardware development seems to have outpaced both the content creation and the software development. The industry has been in a constant state of excitement over the release of new and improved hardware that pushes the capabilities of the medium, and content creators are still scrambling to experiment and learn how to use the new technologies.

One of the products of this tech boom is the Jaunt One camera. It is a 360 camera that was developed with the explicit focus of addressing the many production complexities that plague real life field shooting. What do I mean by that? Well, the camera quickly disassembles and allows you to replace a broken camera module. After all, when you’re across the world and the elephant that is standing in your shot decides to play with the camera, it is quite useful to be able to quickly swap parts instead of having to replace the whole camera or sending it in for repair from the middle of the jungle.

Another of the main selling points of the Jaunt One camera is the streamlined cloud finishing service they provide. It takes the content creator all the way from shooting on set through stitching, editing, onlining and preparing the different deliverables for all the different publishing platforms available. The pipeline is also flexible enough to allow you to bring your footage in and out of the service at any point so you can pick and choose what services you want to use. You could, for example, do your own stitching in Nuke, AVP or any other software and use the Jaunt cloud service to edit and online these stitched videos.

The Jaunt One camera takes a few important details into consideration, such as the synchronization of all of the shutters in the lenses. This prevents stitching abnormalities in fast moving objects that are captured in different moments in time by adjacent lenses.

The camera doesn’t have an internal ambisonics microphone but the cloud service supports ambisonic recordings made in a dual system or Dolby Atmos. It was interesting to notice that one of the toolset apps they released was the Jaunt Slate, a tool that allows for easy slating on all the cameras (without having to run around the camera like a child, clapping repeatedly) and is meant to automatize the synchronization of the separate audio recordings in post.

The Jaunt One camera shows that the market is maturing past its initial DIY stage and the demand for reliable, robust solutions for higher budget productions is now significant enough to attract developers such as Jaunt. Let’s hope tools such as these encourage more and more filmmakers to produce new content in VR.


Blackmagic’s Fusion 9 is now VR-enabled

At SIGGRAPH, Blackmagic was showing Fusion 9, its newly upgraded visual effects, compositing, 3D and motion graphics software. Fusion 9 features new VR tools, an entirely new keyer technology, planar tracking, camera tracking, multi-user collaboration tools and more.

Fusion 9 is available now with a new price point — Blackmagic has lowered the price of its Studio version from $995 to $299 Studio Version. (Blackmagic is also offering a free version of Fusion.) The software now works on Mac, PC and Linux.

Those working in VR get a full 360º true 3D workspace, along with a new panoramic viewer and support for popular VR headsets such as Oculus Rift and HTC Vive. Working in VR with Fusion is completely interactive. GPU acceleration makes it extremely fast so customers can wear a headset and interact with elements in a VR scene in realtime. Fusion 9 also supports stereoscopic VR. In addition, the new 360º spherical camera renders out complete VR scenes, all in a single pass and without the need for complex camera rigs.

The new planar tracker in Fusion 9 calculates motion planes for accurately compositing elements onto moving objects in a scene. For example, the new planar tracker can be used to replace signs or other flat objects as they move through a scene. Planar tracking data can also be used on rotoscope shapes. That means users don’t have to manually animate motion, perspective, position, scale or rotation of rotoscoped elements as the image changes.

Fusion 9 also features an entirely new camera tracker that analyzes the motion of a live-action camera in a scene and reconstructs the identical motion path in 3D space for use with cameras inside of Fusion. This lets users composite elements with precisely matched movement and perspective of the original. Fusion can also use lens metadata for proper framing, focal length and more.

The software’s new delta keyer features a complete set of matte finesse controls for creating clean keys while preserving fine image detail. There’s also a new clean plate tool that can smooth out subtle color variations on blue- and greenscreens in live action footage, making them easier to key.

For multi-user collaboration, Fusion 9 Studio includes Studio Player, a new app that features a playlist,
storyboard and timeline for playing back shots. Studio Player can track version history, display annotation notes, has support for LUTs and more. The new Studio Player is suited for customers that need to see shots in a suite or theater for review and approval. Remote synchronization lets artists  sync Studio Players in multiple locations.

In addition, Fusion 9 features a bin server so shared assets and tools don’t have to be copied onto each user’s local workstation.


PNY’s PrevailPro mobile workstations feature 4K displays, are VR-capable

PNY has launched the PNY PrevailPro P4000 and P3000, thin and light mobile workstations. With their Nvidia Max-Q design, these innovative systems are designed from the Quadro GPU out.

“Our PrevailPro [has] the ability to drive up to four 4K UHD displays at once, or render vividly interactive VR experiences, without breaking backs or budgets,” says Steven Kaner, VP of commercial and OEM sales at PNY Technologies. “The increasing power efficiency of Nvidia Quadro graphics and our P4000-based P955 Nvidia Max-Q technology platform, allows PNY to deliver professional performance and features in thin, light, cool and quiet form factors.”

P3000

PrevailPro features the Pascal architecture within the P4000 and P3000 mobile GPUs, with Intel Core i7-7700HQ CPUs and the HM175 Express chipset.

“Despite ever increasing mobility, creative professionals require workstation class performance and features from their mobile laptops to accomplish their best work, from any location,” says Bob Pette, VP, Nvidia Professional Visualization. “With our new Max-Q design and powered by Quadro P4000 and P3000 mobile GPUs, PNY’s new PrevailPro lineup offers incredibly light and thin, no-compromise, powerful and versatile mobile workstations.”

The PrevailPro systems feature either a 15.6-inch 4K UHD or FHD display – and the ability to drive three external displays (2x mDP 1.4 and HDMI 2.0 with HDCP), for a total of four simultaneously active displays. The P4000 version supports fully immersive VR, the Nvidia VRWorks software development kit and innovative immersive VR environments based on the Unreal or Unity engines.

With 8GB (P4000) or 6GB (P3000) of GDDR5 GPU memory, up to 32GB of DDR4 2400MHz DRAM, 512GB SSD availability, HDD options up to 2TB, a comprehensive array of I/O ports, and the latest Wi-Fi and Bluetooth implementations, PrevailPro is compatible with all commonly used peripherals and network environments — and provides pros with the interfaces and storage capacity needed to complete business-critical tasks. Depending on the use case, Mobile Mark 2014 projects the embedded Li polymer battery can reach five hours over a lifetime of 1,000 charge/discharge cycles.

PrevailPro’s thin and light form factor measures 14.96×9.8×0.73 inches (379mm x 248mm x 18mm) and weighs 4.8 lbs.

 


Quick Chat: SIGGRAPH’S production sessions chair Emily Hsu

With SIGGRAPH 2017 happening in LA next week, we decided to reach out to Emily Hsu, this year’s production sessions chair to find out more about the sessions and the process in picking what to focus on. You can check out this year’s sessions here. By the way, Hsu’s day job is production coordinator at Portland, Oregon’s Laika Studios. So she comes at this from an attendee’s perspective.

How did you decide what panels to offer?
When deciding the production sessions line-up, my team and I consider many factors. One of the first is a presentation’s appeal to a wide range of SIGGRAPH attendees, which means that it strikes a nice harmony between the technical and the artistic. In addition, we consider the line-up as whole. While we retain strong VFX and animated feature favorites, we also want to round out the show with new additions in VR, gaming, television and more.

Ultimately, we are looking for work that stands out — will it inspire and excite attendees? Does it use technology that is groundbreaking or apply existing technologies in a groundbreaking way? Has it received worthy praise and accolades? Does it take risks? Does it tell a story in a unique way? Is it something that we’ve never seen within the production sessions program before? And, of course, does it epitomize the conference theme: “At the Heart of Computer Graphics & Interactive Techniques?”

These must be presentations that truly get to the heart of a project — not just the obvious successes, but also the obstacles, struggles and hard work that made it possible for it all to come together.

How do you make sure there is a balance between creative workflow and technology?
With the understanding that Production Sessions’ subject matter is targeted toward a broad SIGGRAPH audience, the studios and panelists are really able determine that balance.

Production Session proposals are often accompanied by varied line-ups of speakers from either different areas of the companies or different companies altogether. What’s especially incredible is when studio executives or directors are present on a panel and can speak to over-arching visions and goals and how everything interacts in the bigger picture.

These presentations often showcase the cross-pollination and collaboration that is needed across different teams. The projects are major undertakings by mid-to-large size crews that have to work together in problem solving, developing new systems and tools, and innovating new ways to get to the finish line — so the workflow, technology and art all go hand-in-hand. It’s almost impossible to talk about one without talking about the other.

Can you talk more about the new Production Gallery?
The Production Gallery has been a very special project for the Production Sessions team this year. Over the years since Production Sessions began, we’ve had special appearances by Marvel costumes, props, Laika puppets, and an eight-foot tall Noisy Boy robot from Real Steel, but they have only been available for viewing in the presentation time slots.

In creating a new space that runs Sunday through Wednesday of the conference, we’re hoping to give attendees a true up-close-and-personal experience and also honor more studio work that may often go unnoticed or unseen.

When you go behind-the-scenes of a film set or on a studio tour, there are tens of thousands of elements involved – storyboards, concept artwork, maquettes, costumes, props, and more. This space focuses on those physical elements that are lovingly created for each project, beyond the final rendered piece you see in the movie theater. In peeling back the curtain, we’re trying to bring a bit of the studios straight to the attendees.

The Production Gallery is one of the accomplishments from this year that I’m most proud of, and I hope it grows in future SIGGRAPH conferences.

If someone has never been to SIGGRAPH before, what can you tell them to convince them it’s not a show to miss?
SIGGRAPH is a conference to be experienced, not to hear about later. It opens up worlds, inspires creativity, creates connections and surrounds you in genius. I always come out of it reinvigorated and excited for what’s to come.

At SIGGRAPH, you get a glimpse into the future right now — what non-attendees may only be able to see or experience in many years or even decades. If it’s a show you don’t attend, you’re not just missing — you’re missing out.

If they have been in the past, how is this year different and why should they come?
My first SIGGRAPH was 2011 in Vancouver, and I haven’t skipped a single conference since then. Technology changes and evolves in the blink of an eye and I’ve blinked a lot since last year. There’s always something new to be learned or something exciting to see.

The SIGGRAPH 2017 Committee has put an exceptional amount of effort into the attendee experience this year. There are hands-on must-see-it-to-believe-it kinds of experiences in VR Village, the Studio, E-Tech and the all-new VR Theater, as well as improvements to the overall SIGGRAPH experience to make the conference smoother, more fun, collaborative and interactive.

I won’t reveal any surprises here, but I can say that there will be quite a few that you’ll have to see for yourself! And on top of all that, a giraffe named Tiny at SIGGRAPH? That’s got to be one for the SIGGRAPH history books, so come join us in making history.

Assimilate and Z Cam offer second integrated VR workflow bundle

Z Cam and Assimilate are offering their second VR integrated workflow bundle, which features the Z Cam S1 Pro VR camera and the Assimilate Scratch VR Z post tools. The new Z Cam S1 Pro offers a higher level of image quality that includes better handling of low lights and dynamic range with detailed, well-saturated, noise-free video. In addition to the new camera, this streamlined pro workflow combines Z Cam’s WonderStitch optical-flow stitch feature and the end-to-end Scratch VR Z tools.

Z Cam and Assimilate have designed their combined technologies to ensure as simple a workflow as possible, including making it easy to switch back and forth between the S1 Pro functions and the Scratch VR Z tools. Users can also employ Scratch VR Z to do live camera preview, prior to shooting with the S1 Pro. Once the shoot begins with the S1 Pro, Scratch VR Z is then used for dailies and data management, including metadata. You don’t have to remove the SD cards and copy; it’s a direct connect to the PC and then to the camera via a high-speed Ethernet port. Stitching of the imagery is then done in Z Cam’s WonderStitch — now integrated into Scratch VR Z — as well as traditional editing, color grading, compositing, support for multichannel audio from the S1 or external ambisonic sound, finishing and publishing (to all final online or standalone 360 platforms).

Z Cam S1 Pro/Scratch VR Z  bundle highlights include:
• Lower light sensitivity and dynamic range – 4/3-inch CMOS image sensor
• Premium 220 degree MFT fisheye lens, f/2.8~11
• Coordinated AE (automatic exposure) and AWB ( automatic white-balance)
• Full integration with built-in Z Cam Sync
• 6K 30fps resolution (post stitching) output
• Gig-E port (video stream & setting control)
• WonderStich optical-flow based stitching
• Live Streaming to Facebook, YouTube or a private server, including text overlays and green/composite layers for a virtual set
• Scratch VR Z single, a streamlined, end-to-end, integrated VR post workflow

“We’ve already developed a few VR projects with the S1 Pro VR camera and the entire Neotopy team is awed by its image quality and performance,” says Alex Regeffe, VR post production manager at Neotopy Studio in Paris. “Together with the Scratch VR Z tools, we see this integrated workflow as a game changer in creating VR experiences, because our focus is now all on the creativity and storytelling rather than configuring multiple, costly tools and workflows.”

The Z Cam S1 Pro/Scratch VR Z bundle is available within 30 days of ordering. Priced at $11,999 (US), the bundle includes the following:
– Z CamS1 Pro Camera main unit, Z Cam S1 Pro battery unit (w/o battery cells), AC/DC power adapter unit and power connection cables (US, UK, EU).
– A Z Cam WonderStitch license, which is an optical flow-based stitching feature that performs offline stitching of files from Z Cam S1 Pro. Z Cam WonderStitch requires a valid software license associated with a designated Z Cam S1 Pro, and is nontransferable.
– A Scratch VR Z permanent license: a pro VR end-to-end, post workflow with an all-inclusive, realtime toolset for data management, dailies, conform, color grading, compositing, multichannel and ambisonic sound, and finishing, all integrated within the Z Cam S1 Pro camera. Includes one-year of support/updates.

The companies are offering a tutorial about the bundle.