Category Archives: VR

PNY’s PrevailPro mobile workstations feature 4K displays, are VR-capable

PNY has launched the PNY PrevailPro P4000 and P3000, thin and light mobile workstations. With their Nvidia Max-Q design, these innovative systems are designed from the Quadro GPU out.

“Our PrevailPro [has] the ability to drive up to four 4K UHD displays at once, or render vividly interactive VR experiences, without breaking backs or budgets,” says Steven Kaner, VP of commercial and OEM sales at PNY Technologies. “The increasing power efficiency of Nvidia Quadro graphics and our P4000-based P955 Nvidia Max-Q technology platform, allows PNY to deliver professional performance and features in thin, light, cool and quiet form factors.”

P3000

PrevailPro features the Pascal architecture within the P4000 and P3000 mobile GPUs, with Intel Core i7-7700HQ CPUs and the HM175 Express chipset.

“Despite ever increasing mobility, creative professionals require workstation class performance and features from their mobile laptops to accomplish their best work, from any location,” says Bob Pette, VP, Nvidia Professional Visualization. “With our new Max-Q design and powered by Quadro P4000 and P3000 mobile GPUs, PNY’s new PrevailPro lineup offers incredibly light and thin, no-compromise, powerful and versatile mobile workstations.”

The PrevailPro systems feature either a 15.6-inch 4K UHD or FHD display – and the ability to drive three external displays (2x mDP 1.4 and HDMI 2.0 with HDCP), for a total of four simultaneously active displays. The P4000 version supports fully immersive VR, the Nvidia VRWorks software development kit and innovative immersive VR environments based on the Unreal or Unity engines.

With 8GB (P4000) or 6GB (P3000) of GDDR5 GPU memory, up to 32GB of DDR4 2400MHz DRAM, 512GB SSD availability, HDD options up to 2TB, a comprehensive array of I/O ports, and the latest Wi-Fi and Bluetooth implementations, PrevailPro is compatible with all commonly used peripherals and network environments — and provides pros with the interfaces and storage capacity needed to complete business-critical tasks. Depending on the use case, Mobile Mark 2014 projects the embedded Li polymer battery can reach five hours over a lifetime of 1,000 charge/discharge cycles.

PrevailPro’s thin and light form factor measures 14.96×9.8×0.73 inches (379mm x 248mm x 18mm) and weighs 4.8 lbs.

 

Quick Chat: SIGGRAPH’S production sessions chair Emily Hsu

With SIGGRAPH 2017 happening in LA next week, we decided to reach out to Emily Hsu, this year’s production sessions chair to find out more about the sessions and the process in picking what to focus on. You can check out this year’s sessions here. By the way, Hsu’s day job is production coordinator at Portland, Oregon’s Laika Studios. So she comes at this from an attendee’s perspective.

How did you decide what panels to offer?
When deciding the production sessions line-up, my team and I consider many factors. One of the first is a presentation’s appeal to a wide range of SIGGRAPH attendees, which means that it strikes a nice harmony between the technical and the artistic. In addition, we consider the line-up as whole. While we retain strong VFX and animated feature favorites, we also want to round out the show with new additions in VR, gaming, television and more.

Ultimately, we are looking for work that stands out — will it inspire and excite attendees? Does it use technology that is groundbreaking or apply existing technologies in a groundbreaking way? Has it received worthy praise and accolades? Does it take risks? Does it tell a story in a unique way? Is it something that we’ve never seen within the production sessions program before? And, of course, does it epitomize the conference theme: “At the Heart of Computer Graphics & Interactive Techniques?”

These must be presentations that truly get to the heart of a project — not just the obvious successes, but also the obstacles, struggles and hard work that made it possible for it all to come together.

How do you make sure there is a balance between creative workflow and technology?
With the understanding that Production Sessions’ subject matter is targeted toward a broad SIGGRAPH audience, the studios and panelists are really able determine that balance.

Production Session proposals are often accompanied by varied line-ups of speakers from either different areas of the companies or different companies altogether. What’s especially incredible is when studio executives or directors are present on a panel and can speak to over-arching visions and goals and how everything interacts in the bigger picture.

These presentations often showcase the cross-pollination and collaboration that is needed across different teams. The projects are major undertakings by mid-to-large size crews that have to work together in problem solving, developing new systems and tools, and innovating new ways to get to the finish line — so the workflow, technology and art all go hand-in-hand. It’s almost impossible to talk about one without talking about the other.

Can you talk more about the new Production Gallery?
The Production Gallery has been a very special project for the Production Sessions team this year. Over the years since Production Sessions began, we’ve had special appearances by Marvel costumes, props, Laika puppets, and an eight-foot tall Noisy Boy robot from Real Steel, but they have only been available for viewing in the presentation time slots.

In creating a new space that runs Sunday through Wednesday of the conference, we’re hoping to give attendees a true up-close-and-personal experience and also honor more studio work that may often go unnoticed or unseen.

When you go behind-the-scenes of a film set or on a studio tour, there are tens of thousands of elements involved – storyboards, concept artwork, maquettes, costumes, props, and more. This space focuses on those physical elements that are lovingly created for each project, beyond the final rendered piece you see in the movie theater. In peeling back the curtain, we’re trying to bring a bit of the studios straight to the attendees.

The Production Gallery is one of the accomplishments from this year that I’m most proud of, and I hope it grows in future SIGGRAPH conferences.

If someone has never been to SIGGRAPH before, what can you tell them to convince them it’s not a show to miss?
SIGGRAPH is a conference to be experienced, not to hear about later. It opens up worlds, inspires creativity, creates connections and surrounds you in genius. I always come out of it reinvigorated and excited for what’s to come.

At SIGGRAPH, you get a glimpse into the future right now — what non-attendees may only be able to see or experience in many years or even decades. If it’s a show you don’t attend, you’re not just missing — you’re missing out.

If they have been in the past, how is this year different and why should they come?
My first SIGGRAPH was 2011 in Vancouver, and I haven’t skipped a single conference since then. Technology changes and evolves in the blink of an eye and I’ve blinked a lot since last year. There’s always something new to be learned or something exciting to see.

The SIGGRAPH 2017 Committee has put an exceptional amount of effort into the attendee experience this year. There are hands-on must-see-it-to-believe-it kinds of experiences in VR Village, the Studio, E-Tech and the all-new VR Theater, as well as improvements to the overall SIGGRAPH experience to make the conference smoother, more fun, collaborative and interactive.

I won’t reveal any surprises here, but I can say that there will be quite a few that you’ll have to see for yourself! And on top of all that, a giraffe named Tiny at SIGGRAPH? That’s got to be one for the SIGGRAPH history books, so come join us in making history.

Dell 6.15

Assimilate and Z Cam offer second integrated VR workflow bundle

Z Cam and Assimilate are offering their second VR integrated workflow bundle, which features the Z Cam S1 Pro VR camera and the Assimilate Scratch VR Z post tools. The new Z Cam S1 Pro offers a higher level of image quality that includes better handling of low lights and dynamic range with detailed, well-saturated, noise-free video. In addition to the new camera, this streamlined pro workflow combines Z Cam’s WonderStitch optical-flow stitch feature and the end-to-end Scratch VR Z tools.

Z Cam and Assimilate have designed their combined technologies to ensure as simple a workflow as possible, including making it easy to switch back and forth between the S1 Pro functions and the Scratch VR Z tools. Users can also employ Scratch VR Z to do live camera preview, prior to shooting with the S1 Pro. Once the shoot begins with the S1 Pro, Scratch VR Z is then used for dailies and data management, including metadata. You don’t have to remove the SD cards and copy; it’s a direct connect to the PC and then to the camera via a high-speed Ethernet port. Stitching of the imagery is then done in Z Cam’s WonderStitch — now integrated into Scratch VR Z — as well as traditional editing, color grading, compositing, support for multichannel audio from the S1 or external ambisonic sound, finishing and publishing (to all final online or standalone 360 platforms).

Z Cam S1 Pro/Scratch VR Z  bundle highlights include:
• Lower light sensitivity and dynamic range – 4/3-inch CMOS image sensor
• Premium 220 degree MFT fisheye lens, f/2.8~11
• Coordinated AE (automatic exposure) and AWB ( automatic white-balance)
• Full integration with built-in Z Cam Sync
• 6K 30fps resolution (post stitching) output
• Gig-E port (video stream & setting control)
• WonderStich optical-flow based stitching
• Live Streaming to Facebook, YouTube or a private server, including text overlays and green/composite layers for a virtual set
• Scratch VR Z single, a streamlined, end-to-end, integrated VR post workflow

“We’ve already developed a few VR projects with the S1 Pro VR camera and the entire Neotopy team is awed by its image quality and performance,” says Alex Regeffe, VR post production manager at Neotopy Studio in Paris. “Together with the Scratch VR Z tools, we see this integrated workflow as a game changer in creating VR experiences, because our focus is now all on the creativity and storytelling rather than configuring multiple, costly tools and workflows.”

The Z Cam S1 Pro/Scratch VR Z bundle is available within 30 days of ordering. Priced at $11,999 (US), the bundle includes the following:
– Z CamS1 Pro Camera main unit, Z Cam S1 Pro battery unit (w/o battery cells), AC/DC power adapter unit and power connection cables (US, UK, EU).
– A Z Cam WonderStitch license, which is an optical flow-based stitching feature that performs offline stitching of files from Z Cam S1 Pro. Z Cam WonderStitch requires a valid software license associated with a designated Z Cam S1 Pro, and is nontransferable.
– A Scratch VR Z permanent license: a pro VR end-to-end, post workflow with an all-inclusive, realtime toolset for data management, dailies, conform, color grading, compositing, multichannel and ambisonic sound, and finishing, all integrated within the Z Cam S1 Pro camera. Includes one-year of support/updates.

The companies are offering a tutorial about the bundle.


Nugen adds 3D Immersive Extension to Halo Upmix

Nugen Audio has updated its Halo Upmix with a new 3D Immersive Extension, adding further options beyond the existing Dolby Atmos bed track capability. The 3D Immersive Extension now provides ambisonic-compatible output as an alternative to channel-based output for VR, game and other immersive applications. This makes it possible to upmix, re-purpose or convert channel-based audio for an ambisonic workflow.

With this 3D Immersive Extension, Halo fully supports Avid’s newly announced Pro Tools V.2.8, now with native 7.1.2 stems for Dolby Atmos mixing. The combination of Pro Tools 12.8 and Halo 3D Immersive Extension can provide a more fluid workflow for audio post pros handling multi-channel and object-based audio formats.

Halo Upmix is available immediately at a list price of $499 for both OS X and Windows, with support for Avid AAX, AudioSuite, VST2, VST3 and AU formats. The new 3D Immersive Extension replaces the Halo 9.1 Extension and can now be purchased for $199. Owners of the existing Halo 9.1 Extension can upgrade to the Halo 3D Immersive Extension for no additional cost. Support for native 7.1.2 stems in Avid Pro Tools 12.8 is available on launch.


Mocha VR: An After Effects user’s review

By Zach Shukan

If you’re using Adobe After Effects to do compositing and you’re not using Mocha, then you’re holding yourself back. If you’re using Mettle Skybox, you need to check out Mocha VR, the VR-enhanced edition of Mocha Pro.

Mocha Pro, and Mocha VR are all standalone programs where you work entirely within the Mocha environment and then export your tracks, shapes or renders to another program to do the rest of the compositing work. There are plugins for Maxon Cinema 4D, The Foundry’s Nuke, HitFilm, and After Effects that allow you to do more with the Mocha data within your chosen 3D or compositing program. Limited-feature versions of Mocha (Mocha AE and Mocha HitFilm) come installed with the Creative Cloud versions of After Effects and HitFilm 4 Pro, and every update of these plugins is getting closer to looking like a full version of Mocha running inside of the effects panel.

Maybe I’m old school, or maybe I just try to get the maximum performance from my workstation, but I always choose to run Mocha VR by itself and only open After Effects when I’m ready to export. In my experience, all the features of Mocha run more smoothly in the standalone than when they’re launched and run inside of After Effects.**

How does Mocha VR compare to Mocha Pro? If you’re not doing VR, stick with Mocha Pro. However, if you are working with VR footage, you won’t have to bend over backwards to keep using Mocha.

Last year was the year of VR, when all my clients wanted to do something with VR. It was a crazy push to be the first to make something and I rode the wave all year. The thing is there really weren’t many tools specifically designed to work with 360 video. Now this year, the post tools for working with VR are catching up.

In the past, I forced previous versions of Mocha to work with 360 footage before the VR version, but since Mocha added its VR-specific features, stabilizing a 360-camera became cake compared to the kludgy way it works with the industry standard After Effects 360 plugin, Skybox. Also, I’ve used Mocha to track objects in 360 before the addition of an equirectangular* camera and it was super-complicated because I had to splice together a whole bunch of tracks to compensate for the 360 camera distortion. Now it’s possible to create a single track to follow objects as they travel around the camera. Read the footnote for an explanation of equirectangular, a fancy word that you need to know if you’re working in VR.

Now let’s talk about the rest of Mocha’s features…

Rotoscoping
I used to rotoscope by tracing every few frames and then refining the frames in between until I found out about the Mocha way to rotoscope. Because Mocha combines rotoscoping with tracking of arbitrary shapes, all you have to do is draw a shape and then use tracking to follow and deform all the way through. It’s way smarter and more importantly, faster. Also, with the Uberkey feature, you can adjust your shapes on multiple frames at once. If you’re still rotoscoping with After Effects alone, you’re doing it the hard way.

Planar Tracking
When I first learned about Mocha it was all about the planar tracker, and that really is still the heart of the program. Mocha’s basically my go-to when nothing else works. Recently, I was working on a shot where a woman had her dress tucked into her pantyhose, and I pretty much had to recreate a leg of a dress that swayed and flowed along with her as she walked. If it wasn’t for Mocha’s planar tracker I wouldn’t have been able to make a locked-on track of the soft-focus (solid color and nearly without detail) side of the dress. After Effects couldn’t make a track because there weren’t enough contrast-y details.

GPU Acceleration
I never thought Mocha’s planar tracking was slow, even though it is slower than point tracking, but then they added GPU acceleration a version or two ago and now it flies through shots. It has to be at least five times as fast now that it’s using my Nvidia Titan X (Pascal), and it’s not like my CPU was a slouch (an 8-core i7-5960X).

Object Removal
I’d be content using Mocha just to track difficult shots and for rotoscoping, but their object-removal feature has saved me hours of cloning/tracking work in After Effects, especially when I’ve used it to remove camera rigs or puppet rigs from shots.

Mocha’s remove module is the closest thing out there to automated object removal***. It’s as simple as 1) create a mask around the object you want to remove, 2) track the background that your object passes in front of, and then 3) render. Okay, there’s a little more to it, but compared to the cloning and tracking and cloning and tracking and cloning and tracking method, it’s pretty great. Also, a huge reason to get the VR edition of Mocha is that the remove module will work with a 360 camera.

Here I used Mocha object removal to remove ropes that pulled a go-cart in a spot for Advil.

VR Outside of After Effects?
I’ve spent most of this article talking about Mocha with After Effects, because it’s what I know best, but there is one VR pipeline that can match nearly all of Mocha VR’s capabilities: the Nuke plugin Cara VR, but there is a cost to that workflow. More on this shortly.

Where you will hit the limit of Mocha VR (and After Effects in general) is if you are doing 3D compositing with CGI and real-world camera depth positioning. Mocha’s 3D Camera Solve module is not optimized for 360 and the After Effects 3D workspace can be limited for true 3D compositing, compared to software like Nuke or Fusion.

While After Effects sort of tacked on its 3D features to its established 2D workflow, Nuke is a true 3D environment as robust as Autodesk Maya or any of the high-end 3D software. This probably sounds great, but you should also know that Cara VR is $4,300 vs. $1,000 for Mocha VR (the standalone + Adobe plugin version) and Nuke starts at $4,300/year vs. $240/year for After Effects.

Conclusion
I think of Mocha as an essential companion to compositing in After Effects, because it makes routine work much faster and it does some things you just can’t do with After Effects alone. Mocha VR is a major release because VR has so much buzz these days, but in reality it’s pretty much just a version of Mocha Pro with the ability to also work with 360 footage.

*Equirectangular is a clever way of unwrapping a 360 spherical projection, a.k.a, the view we see in VR, by flattening it out into a rectangle. It’s a great way to see the whole 360 view in an editing program, but A: it’s very distorted so it can cause problems for tracking and B: anything that is moving up or down in the equirectangular frame will wrap around to the opposite side (a bit like Pacman when he exits the screen), and non-VR tracking programs will stop tracking when something exits the screen on one side.

**Note: According to the developer, one of the main advantages to running Mocha as a plug-in (inside AE, Premiere, Nuke, etc) for 360 video work is that you are using the host program’s render engine and proxy workflow. Having the ability to do all your tracking, masking and object removal on proxy resolutions is a huge benefit when working at large 360 formats that can be as large as 8k stereoscopic. Additionally, the Mocha modules that render, such as reorient for horizon stabilization or remove module will render inside the plug-in making for a streamlined workflow.

***FayOut was a “coming soon” product that promised an even more automated method for object removal, but as of the publishing of this article it appears that they are no longer “coming soon” and may have folded or maybe their technology was purchased and it will be included in a future product. We shall see…
________________________________________
Zach Shukan is the VFX specialist at SilVR and is constantly trying his hand at the latest technologies in the video post production world.


Red’s Hydrogen One: new 3D-enabled smartphone

In their always subtle way, Red has stated that “the future of personal communication, information gathering, holographic multi-view, 2D, 3D, AR/VR/MR and image capture just changed forever” with the introduction of Hydrogen One, a pocket-sized, glasses-free “holographic media machine.”

Hydrogen One is a standalone, full-featured, unlocked multi-band smartphone, operating on Android OS, that promises “look around depth in the palm of your hand” without the need for separate glasses or headsets. The device features a 5.7-inch professional hydrogen holographic display that switches between traditional 2D content, holographic multi-view content, 3D content and interactive games, and it supports both landscape and portrait modes. Red has also embedded a proprietary H30 algorithm in the OS system that will convert stereo sound into multi-dimensional audio.

The Hydrogen system incorporates a high-speed data bus to enable a comprehensive and expandable modular component system, including future attachments for shooting high-quality motion, still and holographic images. It will also integrate into the professional Red camera program, working together with Scarlet, Epic and Weapon as a user interface and monitor.

Future-users are already talking about this “nifty smartphone with glasses-free 3D,” and one has gone so far as to describe the announcement as “the day 360-video became Betamax, and AR won the race.” Others are more tempered in their enthusiasm, viewing this as a really expensive smartphone with a holographic screen that may or might not kill 360 video. Time will tell.

Initially priced between $1,195 and $1,595, the Hydrogen One is targeted to ship in Q1 of 2018.


Boxx Apexx 4 features i9 X-Series procs, targets post apps

Boxx’s new Apexx 4 6201 workstation features the new 10-core Intel Core i9 X-Series processor. Intel’s most scalable desktop platform ever, X-Series processors offer significant performance increases over previous Intel technology.

“The Intel Core X-Series is the ultimate workstation platform,” reports Boxx VP of engineering Tim Lawrence. “The advantages of the new Intel Core i9, combined with Boxx innovation, will provide architects, engineers and motion media creators with an unprecedented level of performance.”

One of those key Intel X-Series advantages is Intel Turbo Boost 3.0. This technology identifies the two best cores to boost, making the new CPUs ideal for multitasking and virtual reality, as well as editing and rendering high-res 4K/VR video and effects with fast video transcode, image stabilization, 3D effects rendering and animation.

When comparing previous-generation Intel processors to X-Series processors (10-core vs.10-core), the X-Series is up to 14% faster in multi-threaded performance and up to 15% faster in single-threaded performance.

The first in a series of Boxx workstations featuring the new Intel X-Series processors, Apexx 4 6201 also includes up to three professional-grade Nvidia or AMD Radeon Pro graphics cards, and up to 128GB of system memory. The highly configurable Apexx 4 series workstations provide support for single-threaded applications, as well as multi-threaded tasks in applications like 3ds Max, Maya and Adobe CC.

“Professionals choose Boxx because they want to spend more time creating and less time waiting on their compute-intensive workloads,” says Lawrence. “Boxx Apexx workstations featuring new Intel X-Series processors will enable them to create without compromise, to megatask, support a bank of 4K monitors and immerse themselves in VR — all faster than before.”

 

FMPX8.14

Dell partners with Sony on Spider-Man film, showcases VR experience

By Jay Choi

Sony Pictures Imageworks used Dell technology during the creation of the Spider-Man: Homecoming. To celebrate, Dell and Sony held a press junket in New York City that included tech demos and details on the film, as well as the Spider-Man: Homecoming Virtual Reality Experience. While I’m a huge Spider-Man fan, I am not biased in saying it was spectacular.

To begin the VR demo, users are given the same suit Tony Stark designs for Peter Parker in Captain America: Civil War and Spider-Man: Homecoming. The first action you perform is grabbing the mask and putting on the costume. You then jump into a tutorial that teaches you how to use your web-shooter mechanics (which implement intuitively with your VR controllers).

Users are then tasked with thwarting the villainous Vulture from attacking you and the city of New York. Admittedly, I didn’t get too far into the demo. I was a bit confused as to where to progress, but also absolutely stunned by the mechanics and details. Along with pulling triggers to fire webs, each button accessed a different type of web cartridge in your web shooter. So, like Spidey, I had to be both strategic and adaptive to each changing scenario. I actually felt like I was shooting webs and pulling large crates around… I honestly spent most of my time seeing how far the webs could go and what they could stick to — it was amazing!

The Tech
With the power of thousands of workstations, servers and over a petabyte of storage from Dell, Sony Pictures Imageworks and other studios, such as MPC and Method, were able to create the visual effects for the Spider-Man: Homecoming film. The Virtual Reality Experience actually pulled the same models, assets and details used in the film, giving users a truly awesome and immersive experience.

When I asked what this particular VR experience would cost your typical consumer, I was told that when developing the game, Dell researched major VR consoles and workstations and set a benchmark to strive for so most consumers should be able to experience the game without too much of a difference.

Along with the VR game, Dell also showcased its new gaming laptop: the Inspiron 15 7000. With a quad-core H-Class 7th-Gen Intel Core and Nvidia GeForce GTX 1050/1050 Ti, the laptop is marketed for hardcore gaming. It has a tough-yet-sleek design that’s appealing to the eye. However, I was more impressed with its power and potential. The junket had one of these new Inspiron laptops running the recently rebooted Killer Instinct fighting game (which ironically was my very first video game on the Super Nintendo… I guess violent video games did an okay job raising me). As a fighting game fanatic and occasional competitor, I have to say the game ran very smoothly. I couldn’t spot latency between inputs from the USB-connected X-Box One controllers or any frame skipping. It does what it says it can do!

The Inspiron 15 7000 was also featured in the Spider-Man: Homecoming film and was used by Jacob Batalon’s character, Ned, to help aid Peter Parker in his web-tastic mission.

I was also lucky enough to try out Sony Future Lab Program’s projector-based interactive Find Spider-Man game, where the game’s “screen” is projected on a table from a depth-perceiving projector lamp. A blank board was used as a scroll to maneuver a map of New York City, while piles of movable blocks were used to recognize buildings and individual floors. Sometimes Spidey was found sitting on the roof, while other times he was hiding inside on one of the floors.

All in all, Dell and Sony Pictures Imageworks’ partnership provided some sensational insight to what being Spider-Man is like with their technology and innovation, and I hope to see it evolve even further along side more Spider-Man: Homecoming films.

The Spider-Man: Homecoming Virtual Reality Experience arrives on June 30th for all major VR platforms. Marvel’s Spider-Man: Homecoming releases in theaters on July 7th.


Jay Choi is a Korean-American screenwriter, who has an odd fascination with Lego minifigures, a big heart for his cat Sula, and an obsession with all things Spider-Man. He is currently developing an animated television pitch he sold to Nickelodeon and resides in Brooklyn.


Adobe acquires Mettle’s SkyBox tools for 360/VR editing, VFX

Adobe has acquired all SkyBox technology from Mettle, a developer of 360-degree and virtual reality software. As more media and entertainment companies embrace 360/VR, there is a need for seamless, end-to-end workflows for this new and immersive medium.

The Skybox toolset is designed exclusively for post production in Adobe Premiere Pro CC and Adobe After Effects CC and complements Adobe Creative Cloud’s existing 360/VR cinematic production technology. Adobe will integrate SkyBox plugin functionality natively into future releases of Premiere Pro and After Effects.

To further strengthen Adobe’s leadership in 360-degree and virtual reality, Mettle co-founder Chris Bobotis will join Adobe, bringing more than 25 years of production experience to his new role.

“We believe making virtual reality content should be as easy as possible for creators. The acquisition of Mettle SkyBox technology allows us to deliver a more highly integrated VR editing and effects experience to the film and video community,” says Steven Warner, VP of digital video and audio at Adobe. “Editing in 360/VR requires specialized technology, and as such, this is a critical area of investment for Adobe, and we’re thrilled Chris Bobotis has joined us to help lead the charge forward.”

“Our relationship started with Adobe in 2010 when we created FreeForm for After Effects, and has been evolving ever since. This is the next big step in our partnership,” says Bobotis, now director, professional video at Adobe. “I’ve always believed in developing software for artists, by artists, and I’m looking forward to bringing new technology and integration that will empower creators with the digital tools they need to bring their creative vision to life.”

Introduced in April 2015, SkyBox was the first plugin to leverage Mettle’s proprietary 3DNAE technology, and its success quickly led to additional development of 360/VR plugins for Premiere Pro and After Effects.

Today, Mettle’s plugins have been adopted by companies such as The New York Times, CNN, HBO, Google, YouTube, Discovery VR, DreamWorks TV, National Geographic, Washington Post, Apple and Facebook, as well as independent filmmakers and YouTubers.

Technicolor Experience Center launches with HP Mars Home Planet

By Dayna McCallum

Technicolor’s Tim Sarnoff and Marcie Jastrow oversaw the official opening of the Technicolor Experience Center (TEC), with the help of HP’s Sean Young and Rick Champagne, on June 15. The kickoff event also featured the announcement that TEC is teaming up with HP to develop HP Mars Home Planet, an experimental VR experience to reinvent life on Mars for one million humans.

The purpose-built TEC space is located in Blackwelder creative park, a business district designed specifically for the needs of creative and media companies in Culver City. The center, dedicated to bringing artists and scientists together to explore immersive media, covers almost 27,000 square feet, with 3,000 square feet dedicated to motion capture. The TEC serves as a hub connecting Technicolor’s creative houses and research labs across the globe, including an R&D team from France that made an appearance during event via a remote demo, with technology partners, such as HP.

Sarnoff, Technicolor deputy CEO and president of production services, said, “The TEC is about realizing the aspirations of all the players who are part of the nascent immersive ecosystem we work in, from content creation, to content distribution and content consumption. Designing and delivering immersive experiences will require a massive convergence of artistic, technological and economic talent. They will have to come together productively. That is why the TEC has been formed. It is designed to be a practical place where we take theoretical constructs and move systematically to tactical implementation through a creative and dynamic process of experimentation.”

The HP Mars Home Planet project is a global, immersive media collaboration uniting engineers, architects, designers, artists and students to design an urban area on Mars in a VR environment. The project will be built on the terrain from Fusion’s “Mars 2030” game, which is based on research, images, and expertise based on NASA research. In addition to HP, Fusion and TEC, partners include Nvidia, Unreal Engine, Autodesk and HTCVive. Additional details will be released at Siggraph 2017.

Young, worldwide segment manager for product development and AEC for HP Inc., said of the Mars project, “To ensure fidelity and professional-grade quality and a fantastic end-user experience, the TEC is going to oversee the virtual reality development process of the work that is going to be done by collaborators from all over the world. It is an incredible opportunity for anybody from anywhere in the world that is interested in VR to work with Technicolor.”