Category Archives: Virtual Reality

Behind the Title: Spacewalk Sound’s Matthew Bobb

NAME: Matthew Bobb

COMPANY: Pasadena, California’s SpaceWalk Sound 

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
We are a full-service audio post facility specializing in commercials, trailers and spatial sound for virtual reality (VR). We have a heavy focus on branded content with clients such as Panda Express and Biore and studios like Warner Bros., Universal and Netflix.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Partner/Sound Supervisor/Composer

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
I’ve transitioned more into the sound supervisor role. We have a fantastic group of sound designers and mixers that work here, plus a support staff to keep us on track and on budget. Putting my faith in them has allowed me to step away from the small details and look at the bigger picture on every project.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
We’re still a small company, so while I mix and compose a little less than before, I find my days being filled with keeping the team moving forward. Most of what falls under my role is approving mixes, prepping for in-house clients the next day, sending out proposals and following up on new leads. A lot of our work is short form, so projects are in and out the door pretty fast — sometimes it’s all in one day. That means I always have to keep one eye on what’s coming around the corner.

The Greatest Showman 360

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
Lately, it has been showing VR to people who have never tried it or have had a bad first experience, which is very unfortunate since it is a great medium. However, that all changes when you see someone come out of a headset exclaiming,”Wow, that is a game changer!”

We have been very fortunate to work on some well-known and loved properties and to have people get a whole new experience out of something familiar is exciting.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
Dealing with sloppy edits. We have been pushing our clients to bring us into the fold as early as v1 to make suggestions on the flow of each project. I’ll keep my eye tuned to the timing of the dialog in relation to the music and effects, while making sure attention has been paid to the pacing of the edit to the music. I understand that the editor and director will have their attention elsewhere, so I’m trying to bring up potential issues they may miss early enough that they can be addressed.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE TIME OF THE DAY?
I would say 3pm is pretty great most days. I should have accomplished something major by this point, and I’m moments away from that afternoon iced coffee.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
I’d be crafting the ultimate sandwich, trying different combinations of meats, cheeses, spreads and veggies. I’d have a small shop, preferably somewhere tropical. We’d be open for breakfast and lunch, close around 4pm, and then I’d head to the beach to sip on Russell’s Reserve Small Batch Bourbon as the sun sets. Yes, I’ve given this some thought.

WHY DID YOU CHOOSE THIS PROFESSION?
I came from music but quickly burned out on the road. Studio life suited me much more, except all the music studios I worked at seemed to lack focus, or at least the clientele lacked focus. I fell into a few sound design gigs on the side and really enjoyed the creativity and reward of seeing my work out in the world.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
We had a great year working alongside SunnyBoy Entertainment on VR content for the Hollywood studios including IT: Float, The Greatest Showman 360, Annabelle Creation: Bee’s Room and Pacific Rim: Inside the Uprising 360. We also released our first piece of interactive content, IT: Escape from Pennywise, for Gear VR and iOS.

Most recently, I worked on Star Wars: The Last Jedi in Scoring The Last Jedi: A 360 VR Experience. This takes Star Wars fans on a VIP behind-the-scenes intergalactic expedition, giving them on a virtual tour of the The Last Jedi’s production and soundstages and dropping them face-to-face with Academy Award-winning film composer John Williams and film director Rian Johnson.

Personally, I got to compose two Panda Express commercials, which was a real treat considering I sustained myself through college on a healthy diet of orange chicken.

It: Float

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
It: Float was very special. It was exciting to take an existing property that was not only created by Stephen King but was also already loved by millions of people, and expand on it. The experience brought the viewer under the streets and into the sewers with Pennywise the clown. We were able to get very creative with spatial sound, using his voice to guide you through the experience without being able to see him. You never knew where he was lurking. The 360 audio really ramped up the terror! Plus, we had a great live activation at San Diego Comic Con where thousands of people came through and left pumped to see a glimpse of the film’s remake.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
It’s hard to imagine my life without these three: Spotify Premium, no ads! Philips Hue lights for those vibes. Lastly, Slack keeps our office running. It’s our not-so-secret weapon.

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
I treat social media as an escape. I’ll follow The Onion for a good laugh, or Anthony Bourdain to see some far flung corner of earth I didn’t know about.

DO YOU LISTEN TO MUSIC WHEN NOT MIXING OR EDITING?
If I’m doing busy work, I prefer something instrumental like Eric Prydz, Tycho, Bonobo — something with a melody and a groove that won’t make me fall asleep, but isn’t too distracting either.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
The best part about Los Angeles is how easy it is to escape Los Angeles. My family will hit the road for long weekends to Palm Springs, Big Bear or San Diego. We find a good mix of active (hiking) and inactive (2pm naps) things to do to recharge.

VR at NAB 2018: A Parisian’s perspective

By Alexandre Regeffe

Even though my cab driver from the airport to my hotel offered these words of wisdom — “What happens in Vegas, stays in Vegas” — I’ve decided not to listen to him and instead share with you the things that impressed for the VR world at NAB 2018.

Back in September of 2017, I shared with you my thoughts on the VR offerings at the IBC show in Amsterdam. In case you don’t remember my story, I’m a French guy who jumped into the VR stuff three years ago and started a cinematic VR production company called Neotopy with a friend. Three years is like a century in VR. Indeed, this medium is constantly evolving, both technically and financially.

So what has become of VR today? Lots of different things. VR is a big bag where people throw AR, MR, 360, LBE, 180 and 3D. And from all of that, XR (Extended Reality) was born, which means everything.

Insta360 Titan

But if this blurred concept leads to some misunderstanding, is it really good for consumers? Even us pros are finding it difficult to explain what exactly VR is, currently.

While at NAB, I saw a presentation from Nick Bicanic during which he used the term “frameless media.” And, thank you, Nick, because I think that is exactly what‘s in this big bag called VR… or XR. Today, we consume a lot of content through a frame, which is our TV, computer, smartphone or cinema screen. VR allows us to go beyond the frame, and this is a very important shift for cinematographers and content creators.

But enough concepts and ideas, let us start this journey on the NAB show floor! My first stop was the VR pavilion, also called the “immersive storytelling pavilion” this year.

My next stop was to see SGO Mistika. For over a year, the SGO team has been delivering an incredible stitching software with its Mistika VR. In my opinion, there is a “before” and an “after” this tool. Thanks to its optical flow capacities, you can achieve a seamless stitching 99% of the time, even with very difficult shooting situations. The last version of the software provided additional features like stabilization, keyframe capabilities, more cameras presets and easy integration with Kandao and Insta360 camera profiles. VR pros used Mistika’s booth as sort of a base camp, meeting the development team directly.

A few steps from Misitka was Insta360, with a large, yellow booth. This Chinese company is a success story with the consumer product Insta360 One, a small 360 camera for the masses. But I was more interested in the Insta360 Pro, their 8K stereoscopic 3D360 flagship camera used by many content creators.

At the show, Insta360’s big announcement was Titan, a premium version of the Insta360 Pro offering better lenses and sensors. It’s available later this year. Oh, and there was the lightfield camera prototype, the company’s first step into the volumetric capture world.

Another interesting camera manufacturer at the show was Human Eyes Technology, presenting their Vuze+. With this affordable 3D360 camera you can dive into stereoscopic 360 content and learn the basics about this technology. Side note: The Vuze+ was chosen by National Geographic to shoot some stunning sequences in the International Space Station.

Kandao Obsidian

My favorite VR camera company, Kandao, was at NAB showing new features for its Obsidian R and S cameras. One of the best is the 6DoF capabilities. With this technology, you can generate a depth map from the camera directly in Kandao Studio, the stitching software, which comes free when you buy an Obsidian. With the combination of a 360 stitched image and depth map, you can “walk” into your movie. It’s an awesome technique for better immersion. For me this was by far the best innovation in VR technology presented on the show floor

The live capabilities of Obsidian cameras have been improved, with a dedicated Kandao Live software, which allows you to live stream 4K stereoscopic 360 with optical flow stitching on the fly! And, of course, do not forget their new Qoocam camera. With its three-lens-equipped little stick, you can either do VR 180 stereoscopic or 360 monoscopic, while using depth map technology to refocus or replace the background in post — all with a simple click. Thanks to all these innovations, Kandao is now a top player in the cinematic VR industry.

One Kandao competitor is ZCam. They were there with a couple of new products: the ZCam V1, a 3D360 camera with a tiny form factor. It’s very interesting for shooting scenes where things are very close to the camera. It keeps a good stereoscopy even on nearby objects, which is a major issue with most of VR cameras and rigs. The second one is the small E2 – while it’s not really a VR camera, it can be used as an underwater rig, for example.

ZCam K1 Pro

The ZCam product range is really impressive and completely targeting professionals, from ZCam S1 to ZCam V1 Pro. Important note: take a look at their K1 Pro, a VR 180 camera, if you want to produce high-end content for the Google VR180 ecosystem.

Another VR camera at NAB was Samsung’s Round, offering stereoscopic capabilities. This relatively compact device comes with a proprietary software suite for stitching and viewing 360 shots. Thanks to IP65 normalization, you can use this camera outdoors in difficult weather conditions, like rain, dust or snow. It was great to see the live streaming 4K 3D360 operating on the show floor, using several Round cameras combined with powerful Next Computing hardware.

VR Post
Adobe Creative Cloud 2018 remains the must-have tool to achieve VR post production without losing your mind. Numerous 360-specific functionalities have been added during the last year, after Adobe bought the Mettle Skybox suite. The most impressive feature is that you can now stay in your 360 environment for editing. You just put your Oculus rift headset on and manipulate your Premiere timeline with touch controllers and proceed to edit your shots. Think of it as a Minority Report-style editing interface! I am sure we can expect more amazing VR tools from Adobe this year.

Google’s Lightfield technology

Mettle was at the Dell booth showing their new Adobe CC 360 plugin, called Flux. After an impressive Mantra release last year, Flux is now available for VR artists, allowing them to do 3D volumetric fractals and to create entire futuristic worlds. It was awesome to see the results in a headset!

Distributing VR
So once you have produced your cinematic VR content, how can you distribute it? One option is to use the Liquid Cinema platform. They were at NAB with a major update and some new features, including seamless transitions between a “flat” video and a 360 video. As a content creator you can also manage your 360 movies in a very smart CMS linked to your app and instantly add language versions, thumbnails, geoblocking, etc. Another exciting thing is built-in 6DoF capability right in the editor with a compatible headset — allowing you to walk through your titles, graphics and more!

I can’t leave without mentioning Voysys for live-streaming VR; Kodak PixPro and its new cameras ; Google’s next move into lightfield technology ; Bonsai’s launch of a new version of the Excalibur rig ; and many other great manufacturers, software editors and partners.

See you next time, Sin City.

Cinna 4.13

VFX vet Rob Bredow takes helm at ILM, Gretchen Libby upped to VP

Industrial Light & Magic (ILM) has named Rob Bredow as SVP, executive creative director and head of ILM, which is a division of Lucasfilm. Bredow will be in charge of all of ILM’s four studios worldwide — in San Francisco, London, Singapore and Vancouver — and report to Lucasfilm GM Lynwen Brennan.

In addition, it was announced that Gretchen Libby has been promoted to VP, marketing and production. She will report to Bredow. More on Libby in a bit.

Bredow joined ILM as a VFX supervisor in 2014 and shortly thereafter was named VP of new media and head of Lucasfilm’s Advanced Development Group. He helped launch a new division, ILMxLAB, in 2015, combining the talents of Lucasfilm, ILM, and Skywalker Sound to develop, create, and release story-based immersive entertainment.

In 2016, Bredow was promoted to CTO of Lucasfilm, overseeing technical operations and partnerships as well as the company’s technology roadmap. Currently, Bredow is working as the visual effects supervisor and co-producer on Solo: A Star Wars Story directed by Ron Howard, which releases on May 25, 2018.

Prior to joining ILM, Bredow was the CTO and visual effects supervisor at Sony Pictures Imageworks. He has worked on films such as Independence Day, Godzilla, Stuart Little, Castaway, Surf’s Up, Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs and many others.

He is a member of the Academy of Motion Pictures Arts & Sciences (Visual Effects Branch) and the AMPAS Scientific and Technical Council and, in 2010, was nominated for a Visual Effects Society Award Outstanding Effects Animation in an Animated Feature Motion Picture.

Gretchen Libby

Libby started at ILM in 1997 as a production manager. A year later, she was promoted to associate visual effects producer for A Perfect Storm and then to visual effects producer on Star Wars: Attack of the Clones two years later. In her previous role, Libby had focused on the company’s global expansion, which included opening studios in Singapore, Vancouver and London, and was the key marketing point of contact for ILM’s clients. Libby’s focus will remain on client marketing, overseeing all global production and strategic relationships. Prior to ILM, Libby worked in visual effects film production at Pacific Data Images in Palo Alto, California, and in visual effects commercial production in New York.

Libby is a member of the Producers Guild of America and formerly served on the board of directors of the Visual Effects Society of which she remains a member. She is also a member of Women in Film and has served as a producer on 29 feature films, eight of which received Academy Award nominations for visual effects.


The-Artery embraces a VR workflow for Mercedes spots

The-Artery founder and director Vico Sharabani recently brought together an elite group of creative artists and skilled technologists to create a cross-continental VR production pipeline for Mercedes-Benz’s Masters tournament brand campaign called “What Makes Us.”

Emmy-nominated cinematographer Paul Cameron (Westworld) and VFX supervisor Rob Moggach co-directed the project, which features a series six of intense broadcast commercials — including two fully CGI spots that were “shot” in a completely virtual world.

The agency and The-Artery team, including Vico Sharabani (third from the right).

This pair of 30-second commercials, First and Can’t, are the first to be created using a novel, realtime collaborative VR software application called Nu Design with Atom View technology. While in Los Angeles, Cameron worked within a virtual world, choosing camera bodies and lenses inside the space that allowed him to “shoot” for POV and angles that would have taken weeks to complete in the real world.

The software enabled him to grab and move the camera while all artistic camera direction was recorded virtually and used for final renders. This allowed both Sharabani, who was in NYC, and Moggach, who was in Toronto, to interact live and in realtime as if they were standing together on a physical set.

We reached out to Sharabani, Cameron and Moggach for details on VR workflow, and how they see the technology impacting production and creativity.

How did you come to know about Nurulize and the Nu Design Atom View technology?
Vico Sharabani: Scott Metzger, co-founder of Nurulize, is a long-time friend, colleague and collaborator. We have all been supporting each other’s careers and initiatives, so as soon as the alpha version of Nu Design was operational, we jumped on the opportunity of deploying it in real production.

How does the ability to shoot in VR change the production paradigm moving forward?
Rob Moggach: From scout to pre-light to shoot, through to dailies and editorial, it allows us to collaborate on digital productions in a traditional filmmaking process with established roles and procedures that are known to work.

Instead of locking animated productions into a rigid board, previs, animation workflow, a director can make decisions on editorial and find unexpected moments in the capture that wouldn’t necessarily be boarded and animated otherwise. Being able to do all of this without geographical restriction and still feel like you’re together in the same room is remarkable.

What types of projects are ideal for this new production pipeline?
Sharabani: The really beautiful thing for The-Artery, as a first time user of this technology, is to prove that this workflow can be used by companies like us on every project, and not only in films by Steven Spielberg and James Cameron. The obvious ideal fit is for projects like fully CGI productions; previs of big CGI environments that need to be considered in photography; virtual previs of scouted locations in remote or dangerous locations; blocking of digital sets in pre-existing greenscreen or partially built stages; and multiple remote creative teams that need to share a vision and input

What are the specific benefits?
Moggach: With a virtual pipeline, we are able to…
1) Work much faster than traditional previs to quickly capture multiple camera setups.
2) Visualize environments and CGI with a camera in-hand to find shots you didn’t know were there on screen.
3) Interact closely regardless of location and truly feel together in the same place.
4) Use known filmmaking processes, allowing us to capitalize on established wisdom and experience.

What impacts will it have to creativity?
Paul Cameron: For me, the VR workflow added a great impact to the overall creative approach for both commercials. It enabled me to go into the environment and literally grab a camera, move around the car, be in the middle of the car, pull the camera over the car. Basically, it allowed me to put the camera in places I always wanted to put the camera, but it would take hours to get cranes or scaffold for different positions.

The other fascinating thing is that you are able to scale the set up and down. For instance, I was able to scale the car down to 25% its normal size and make a very drastic camera move over the car, handheld with a VR camera, and with the combination of slowing it down, and smoothing it down a bit, we were able to design camera moves that were very organic and very natural.

I think it also allowed me to achieve a greater understanding of the set size and space, the geometry of the set and the relationship of the car to the set. In the past, it would be a process of going through a wireframe, waiting for the rendering — in this case, the car — and programming camera moves. It basically helps with conceptualization of camera moves and shot design in a new way for me.

Also being a director of photography, it is very empowering to be able to grab the camera literally with a controller and move through that space. Again, it just takes a matter of seconds to make very dramatic camera moves, whereas even on set it could take upwards of an hour or two to move a technocrane and actually get a feel for that shot, so it is very empowering overall.

What does it now allow directors to achieve?
Cameron: One of the better features about the VR workflow is that you can actually just teleport yourself around the set while you are inside of it. So, basically, you picture yourself inside this set, and with a left hand controller and one for the right hand, you have the ability to kind of teleport yourself to different perspectives. In this case, the automobile, the geometry and wireframe geometry of the set, so it gives you a very good idea of the perspectives from different angles and you can move around really quickly.

The other thing that I found fascinating was that not only can you move around this set, in this case, I was able to fly… upwards of about 150 feet and look down on the set. This was, while you are immersed in the VR world, quite intoxicating. You are literally flying and hovering above the set, and it kind of feels like you are standing on a beam with no room to move forward or backward without falling.

Paul Cameron

So the ability to move around in an endless set perspective-wise and teleport yourself around and above the set looking down, was amazing. In the case of the Can’t commercial, I was able to teleport on the other side of the wind turbine and look back at the automobile.

Although we had the 3D CADs of sets in the past, and we were able to travel around and look at camera positions, somehow the immediacy and the power of being in the VR environment with the two controllers was quite powerful. I think for one of the sessions I had the glasses on for almost four hours straight. We recorded multiple camera moves, and everybody was quite shocked that I was in the environment for that long. But for me, it was like being on a set, almost like a pre-pre-light or something, where I was able to have my space as a director and move around and get to see my angles and design my shots.

What other tools did you use?
Sharabani: Houdini for CG,Redshift (with support of GridMarkets) for rendering, Nuke for compositing, Flame for finishing, Resolve for color grading and Premiere for editing.


NextComputing, Z Cam, Assimilate team on turnkey VR studio

NextComputing, Z Cam and Assimilate have teamed up to create a complete turnkey VR studio. Foundation VR Studio is designed to provide all aspects of the immersive production process and help the creatives be more creative.

According to Assimilate CEO Jeff Edson, “Partnering with Z Cam last year was an obvious opportunity to bring together the best of integrated 360 cameras with a seamless workflow for both live and post productions. The key is to continue to move the market from a technology focus to a creative focus. Integrated cameras took the discussions up a level of integration away from the pieces. There have been endless discussions regarding capable platforms for 360; the advantage we have is we work with just about every computer maker as well as the component companies, like CPU and GPU manufacturers. These are companies that are willing to create solutions. Again, this is all about trying to help the market focus on the creative as opposed to debates about the technology, and letting creative people create great experiences and content. Getting the technology out of their way and providing solutions that just work helps with this.”

These companies are offering a few options with their Power VR Studio.

The Foundation VR Studio, which costs $8,999 and is available now includes:
• NextComputing Edge T100 workstation
o CPU: 6-core Intel core i7-8700K 3.7GHz processor
o Memory: 16GB DDR4 2666MHz RAM
• Z Cam S1 6K professional VR camera
• Z Cam WonderStitch software for offline stitching and profile creation
• Assimilate Scratch VR Z post software and live streaming for Z Cam

Then there is the Power VR Studio, for $10,999, which is also available now. It includes:
• NextComputing Edge T100 workstation
o CPU: 10-core Intel core i9-7900K 3.3GHz processor
o Memory: 32GB DDR4 2666MHz RAM
• Z Cam S1 6K professional VR camera
• Z Cam WonderStitch software for offline stitching and profile creation
• Assimilate Scratch VR Z post software and live streaming for Z Cam

These companies will be at NAB demoing the systems.

 

 


GTC embraces machine learning and AI

By Mike McCarthy

I had the opportunity to attend GTC 2018, Nvidia‘s 9th annual technology conference in San Jose this week. GTC stands for GPU Technology Conference, and GPU stands for graphics processing unit, but graphics makes up a relatively small portion of the show at this point. The majority of the sessions and exhibitors are focused on machine learning and artificial intelligence.

And the majority of the graphics developments are centered around analyzing imagery, not generating it. Whether that is classifying photos on Pinterest or giving autonomous vehicles machine vision, it is based on the capability of computers to understand the content of an image. Now DriveSim, Nvidia’s new simulator for virtually testing autonomous drive software, dynamically creates imagery for the other system in the Constellation pair of servers to analyze and respond to, but that is entirely machine-to-machine imagery communication.

The main exception to this non-visual usage trend is Nvidia RTX, which allows raytracing to be rendered in realtime on GPUs. RTX can be used through Nvidia’s OptiX API, as well as Microsoft’s DirectX RayTracing API, and eventually through the open source Vulkan cross-platform graphics solution. It integrates with Nvidia’s AI Denoiser to use predictive rendering to further accelerate performance, and can be used in VR applications as well.

Nvidia RTX was first announced at the Game Developers Conference last week, but the first hardware to run it was just announced here at GTC, in the form of the new Quadro GV100. This $9,000 card replaces the existing Pascal-based GP100 with a Volta-based solution. It retains the same PCIe form factor, the quad DisplayPort 1.4 outputs and the NV-Link bridge to pair two cards at 200GB/s, but it jumps the GPU RAM per card from 16GB to 32GB of HBM2 memory. The GP100 was the first Quadro offering since the K6000 to support double-precision compute processing at full speed, and the increase from 3,584 to 5,120 CUDA cores should provide a 40% increase in performance, before you even look at the benefits of the 640 Tensor Cores.

Hopefully, we will see simpler versions of the Volta chip making their way into a broader array of more budget-conscious GPU options in the near future. The fact that the new Nvidia RTX technology is stated to require Volta architecture CPUs leads me to believe that they must be right on the horizon.

Nvidia also announced a new all-in-one GPU supercomputer — the DGX-2 supports twice as many Tesla V100 GPUs (16) with twice as much RAM each (32GB) compared to the existing DGX-1. This provides 81920 CUDA cores addressing 512GB of HBM2 memory, over a fabric of new NV-Link switches, as well as dual Xeon CPUs, Infiniband or 100GbE connectivity, and 32TB of SSD storage. This $400K supercomputer is marketed as the world’s largest GPU.

Nvidia and their partners had a number of cars and trucks on display throughout the show, showcasing various pieces of technology that are being developed to aid in the pursuit of autonomous vehicles.

Also on display in the category of “actually graphics related” was the new Max-Q version of the mobile Quadro P4000, which is integrated into PNY’s first mobile workstation, the Prevail Pro. Besides supporting professional VR applications, the HDMI and dual DisplayPort outputs allow a total of three external displays up to 4K each. It isn’t the smallest or lightest 15-inch laptop, but it is the only system under 17 inches I am aware of that supports the P4000, which is considered the minimum spec for professional VR implementation.

There are, of course, lots of other vendors exhibiting their products at GTC. I had the opportunity to watch 8K stereo 360 video playing off of a laptop with an external GPU. I also tried out the VRHero 5K Plus enterprise-level HMD, which brings the VR experience to whole other level. Much more affordable is TP-Cast’s $300 wireless upgrade Vive and Rift HMDs, the first of many untethered VR solutions. HTC has also recently announced the Vive Pro, which will be available in April for $800. It increases the resolution by 1/3 in both dimensions to 2880×1600 total, and moves from HDMI to DisplayPort 1.2 and USB-C. Besides VR products, they also had all sorts of robots in various forms on display.

Clearly the world of GPUs has extended far beyond the scope of accelerating computer graphics generation, and Nvidia is leading the way in bringing massive information processing to a variety of new and innovative applications. And if that leads us to hardware that can someday raytrace in realtime at 8K in VR, then I suppose everyone wins.


Mike McCarthy is an online editor/workflow consultant with 10 years of experience on feature films and commercials. He has been involved in pioneering new solutions for tapeless workflows, DSLR filmmaking and multi-screen and surround video experiences. Check out his site.


Supersphere offering flypacks for VR/360 streaming

Supersphere, a VR/360° production studio, will be at NAB this year debuting 12G glass-to-glass flypacks optimized for live VR/360° streaming. These multi-geometry (mesh/rectilinear/equirectangular) flypacks can handle 360°, 180°, 4K or HD production and seamlessly mix and match each geometry. They also include built-in VDN (video distribution network) encoding and delivery for live streaming to any platform or custom player.

“Live music, both in streaming and in ticket sales, has posted consistent growth in the US and Worldwide. It’s a multibillion-dollar industry and only getting bigger. We are investing in the immersive streaming market, because we see that trend reflected in our client requests,” explains founder/EP of Supershere. “Clients always want to provide audiences with the most engaging experience possible. An immersive environment is the way to do it.”

Each flypack is standard equipped with Z Cam K1 Pro 180° cameras and Z CAM S1 Pro 360° cameras, and customizable to any camera as productions demand. They are also equipped with Blackmagic’s latest ATEM Production Studio 4K live production switchers to facilitate multi-camera live production across a range of video sources. The included Assimilate Scratch VR Z enables realtime geometry, stitching, color grading, finishing and ambisonic audio. The system also offers fully integrated transcoding and delivery — Teleos Media’s VDN (Video Distribution Network) delivers immersive experiences to any devicewith instant start experience, sustained 16Mbps at high frame rates and 4K + VR resolutions. This allows clients to easily build custom 360° video players on their websites or apps as a destination for live-streamed content, in addition to streaming directly to YouTube, Facebook and other popular platforms.

“These flypacks provide an incredibly robust workflow that takes the complexity out of immersive live production — capable of handling the data required for stunning high-resolution projects in one flexible end-to-end package,” says Wilson. “Plus with Teleos’ VDN capabilities, we make it easy for any client to live stream high-end content directly to whatever device or app best suits their customers’ needs, including the option to quickly build custom, fully integrated 360° live players.”


Z Cam, Assimilate reduce price of S1 VR camera/Scratch VR bundle

The Z Cam S1 VR camera/WonderStitch/Assimilate Scratch VR Z bundle, an integrated VR production workflow offering, is now $3,999, down from $4,999.

The Z Cam S1/Scratch VR Z bundle provides acquisition via Z Cam’s S1 pro VR camera, stitching via the WonderStitch software and a streamlined VR post workflow via Assimilate’s realtime Scratch VR Z tools.

Here are some details:
If streaming live 360 from the Z Cam S1 through Scratch VR Z, users can take advantage of realtime features such as inserting/composting graphics/text overlays, including animations, and keying for elements like greenscreen — all streaming live to Facebook Live 360.

Scratch VR Z can be used to do live camera preview, prior to shooting with the S1. During the shoot, Scratch VR Z is used for dailies and data management, including metadata. It’s a direct connect to the PC and then to the camera via a high-speed Ethernet port. Stitching of the imagery is done in Z Cam’s WonderStitch, now integrated into Scratch VR Z, then comes traditional editing, color grading, compositing, multichannel audio from the S1 or adding external ambisonic sound, finishing and then publishing to all final online or stand-alone 360 platforms.

The Z Cam S1/Scratch VR Z bundle is available now.


Behind the Title: Light Sail VR’s Matthew Celia

NAME: Matthew Celia

COMPANY: LA’s Light Sail VR (@lightsailvr)

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
Light Sail VR is a virtual reality production company specializing in telling immersive narrative stories. We’ve built a strong branded content business over the last two years working with clients such as Google and GoPro, and studios like Paramount and ABC.

Whether it’s 360 video, cinematic VR or interactive media, we’ve built an end-to-end pipeline to go from script to final delivery. We’re now excited to be moving into creating original IP and more interactive content that fuses cinematic live-action film footage with game engine mechanics.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Creative Director and Managing Partner

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
A lot! We’re a small boutique shop so we all wear many hats. First and foremost, I am a director and work hard to deliver a compelling story and emotional connection to the audience for each one of our pieces. Story first is our motto, and I try and approach every technical problem with a creative solution. Figuring out execution is a large part of that.

In addition to the production side, I also carry a lot of the technical responsibilities in post production, such as keeping our post pipeline humming and inventing new workflows. Most recently, I have been dabbling in programming interactive cinema using the Unity game engine.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
I am in charge of washing the lettuce when we do our famous “Light Sail VR Sandwich Club” during lunch. Yes, you get fed for free if you work with us, and I make an amazing italian sandwich.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
Hard to say. I really like what I do. I like being on set and working with actors because VR is such a great medium for them to play in, and it’s exciting to collaborate with such creative and talented people.

National Parks Service

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
Render times and computer crashes. My tech life is in constant beta. Price we pay for being on the bleeding edge, I guess!

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE TIME OF THE DAY?
I like the early morning because it is quiet, my brain is fresh, and I haven’t yet had 20 people asking something of me.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
Probably the same, but at a large company. If I left the film business I’d probably teach. I love working with kids.

WHY DID YOU CHOOSE THIS PROFESSION?
I feel like I’ve wanted to be a filmmaker since I could walk. My parents like to drag out the home movies of me asking to look in my dad’s VHS video camera when I was 4. I spent most of high school in the theater and most people assumed I would be an actor. But senior year I fell in love with film when I shot and cut my first 16mm reversal stock on an old reel-to-reel editing machine. The process was incredibly fun and rewarding and I was hooked. I only recently discovered VR, but in many ways it feels like the right path for me because I think cinematic VR is the perfect intersection of filmmaking and theater.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
On the branded side, we just finished up two tourism videos. One for the National Parks Service which was a 360 tour of the Channel Islands with Jordan Fisher and the other was a 360 piece for Princess Cruises. VR is really great to show people the world. The last few months of my life have been consumed by Light Sail VR’s first original project, Speak of the Devil.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
Speak of the Devil is at the top of that list. It’s the first live-action interactive project I’ve worked on and it’s massive. Crafted using the GoPro Odyssey camera in partnership with Google Jump it features over 50 unique locations, 13 different endings and is currently taking up about 80TB of storage (and counting). It is the largest project I’ve worked on to date, and we’ve done it all on a shoestring budget thanks to the gracious contributions of talented creative folks who believed in our vision.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
My instant-read grill meat thermometer, my iPhone and my Philips Hue bulbs. Seriously, if you have a baby, it’s a life saver being able to whisper, Hey, Siri, turn off the lights.”

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
I’m really active on several Facebook groups related to 360 video production. You can get a lot of advice and connect directly with vendors and software engineers. It’s a great community.

DO YOU LISTEN TO MUSIC WHILE YOU WORK?
I tend to pop on some music when I’m doing repetitive mindless tasks, but when I have to be creative or solve a tough tech problem, the music is off so that I can focus. My favorite music to work to tends to be Dave Matthews Band live albums. They get into 20-minute long jams and it’s great.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
De-stressing is really hard when you own your own company. I like to go walking, but if that doesn’t work, I’ll try diving into some cooking for my family, which forces me to focus on something not work related. I tend to feel better after eating a really good meal.

Rogue takes us on VR/360 tour of Supermodel Closets

Rogue is a NYC-based creative boutique that specializes in high-end production and post for film, advertising and digital. Since its founding two years ago, executive creative director, Alex MacLean and his team have produced a large body of work providing color grading, finishing and visual effects for clients such as HBO, Vogue, Google, Vice, Fader and more. For the past three years MacLean has also been at the forefront of VR/360 content for narratives and advertising.

MacLean recently wrapped up post production on four five-minute episodes of 360-degree tours of Supermodel Closets. The series is a project of Conde Nast Entertainment and Vogue for Vogue’s 125th anniversary. If you’re into fashion, this VR tour gives you a glimpse at what supermodels wear in their daily lives. Viewers can look up, down and all around to feel immersed in the closet of each model as she shows her favorite fashions and shares the stories behind their most prized pieces.

 

Tours include the closets of Lily Aldridge, Cindy Crawford, Kendall Jenner  and
Amber Valletta.

MacLean worked with director Julina Tatlock, who is a co-founder and CEO of 30 Ninjas, a digital entertainment company that develops, writes and produces VR, multi-platform and interactive content. Rogue and 30 Ninjas worked together to determine the best workflow for the series. “I always think it’s best practice to collaborate with the directors, DPs and/or production companies in advance of a VR shoot to sort out any technical issues and pre-plan the most efficient production process from shoot to edit, stitching through all the steps of post-production,” reports MacLean. “Foresight is everything; it saves a lot of time, money, and frustration for everyone, especially when working in VR, as well as 3D.”

According to MacLean, they worked with a new camera format, the YI Halo camera, which is designed for professional VR data acquisition. “I often turn to the Assimilate team to discuss the format issues because they always support the latest camera formats in their Scratch VR tools. This worked well again because I needed to define an efficient VR and 3D workflow that would accommodate the conforming, color grading, creating of visual effects and the finishing of a massive amount of data at 6.7K x 6.7K resolution.”

 

The Post
“The post production process began by downloading 30 Ninjas’ editorial, stitched footage from the cloud to ingest into our MacBook Pro workstations to do the conform at 6K x 6K,” explains MacLean. “Organized data management is a critical step in our workflow, and Scratch VR is a champ at that. We were simultaneously doing the post for more than one episode, as well as other projects within the studio, so data efficiency is key.”

“We then moved the conformed raw 6.7K x 6.7K raw footage to our HP Z840 workstations to do the color grading, visual effects, compositing and finishing. You really need powerful workstations when working at this resolution and with this much data,” reports MacLean. “Spherical VR/360 imagery requires focused concentration, and then we’re basically doing everything twice when working in 3D. For these episodes, and for all VR/360 projects, we create a lat/long that breaks out the left eye and right eye into two spherical images. We then replicate the work from one eye to the next, and color correct any variances. The result is seamless color grading.

 

“We’re essentially using the headset as a creative tool with Scratch VR, because we can work in realtime in an immersive environment and see the exact results of work in each step of the post process,” he continues. “This is especially useful when doing any additional compositing, such as clean-up for artifacts that may have been missed or adding or subtracting data. Working in realtime eases the stress and time of doing a new composite of 360 data for the left eye and right eye 3D.”

Playback of content in the studio is very important to MacLean and team, and he calls the choice of multiple headsets another piece to the VR/360 puzzle. “The VR/3D content can look different in each headset so we need to determine a mid-point aesthetic look that displays well in each headset. We have our own playback black box that we use to preview the color grading and visual effects, before committing to rendering. And then we do a final QC review of the content, and for these episodes we did so in Google Daydream (untethered), HTV Live (tethered) and the Oculus Rift (tethered).”

MacLean sees rendering as one of their biggest challenges. “It’s really imperative to be diligent throughout all the internal and client reviews prior to rendering. It requires being very organized in your workflow from production through finishing, and a solid QC check. Content at 6K x 6K, VR/360 and 3D means extremely large files and numerous hours of rendering, so we want to restrict re-rendering as much as possible.”