Category Archives: Storage

Avid adds to Nexis product line with Nexis|E5

The Nexis|E5 NL nearline storage solution from Avid is now available. The addition of this high-density on-premises solution to the Avid Nexis family allows Avid users to manage media across all their online, nearline and archive storage resources.

Avid Nexis|E5 NL includes a new web-based Nexis management console for managing, controlling and monitoring Nexis installations. NexislE5 NL can be easily accessed through MediaCentral | Cloud UX or Media Composer and also integrates with MediaCentral|Production Management, MediaCentral|Asset Management and MediaCentral|Editorial Management to help collaboration, with advanced features such as project and bin sharing. Extending the Nexis|FS (file system) to a secondary storage tier makes it easy to search for, find and import media, enabling users to locate content distributed throughout their operations more quickly.

Build for project parking, staging workflows and proxy archive, Avid reports that Nexis | E5 NL streamlines the workflow between active and non-active assets, allowing media organizations to park assets as well as completed projects on high-density nearline storage, and keep them within easy reach for rediscovery and reuse.

Up to eight Nexis|E5 NL engines can be integrated as one virtualizable pool of storage, making content and associated projects and bins more accessible. In addition, other Avid Nexis Enterprise engines can be integrated into a single storage system that is partitioned for better archival organization.

Additional Nexis|E5 NL features include:
• It’s scalable from 480TB of storage to more than 7PB by connecting multiple Nexis|E5 NL engines together as a single nearline system for a highly scalable, lower-cost secondary tier of storage.
• It offers flexible storage infrastructure that can be provisioned with required capacity and fault-tolerance characteristics.
• Users can configure, control and monitor Nexis using the updated management console that looks and feels like a MediaCentral|Cloud UX application. Its dashboard provides an overview of the system’s performance, bandwidth and status, as well as access to quickly configure and manage workspaces, storage groups, user access, notifications and other functions. It offers the flexibility and security of HTML5 along with an interface design that enables mobile device support.

DigitalGlue’s Creative.Space intros all-Flash 1RU OPMS storage

Creative.Space, a division of DigitalGlue that provides on-premise managed storage (OPMS) as a service for production and post companies as well as broadcast networks, has added the Breathless system to its offerings. The product will make its debut at Cine Gear in LA next month.

The Breathless Next Generation Small Form Factor (NGSFF) media storage system offers 36 front-serviceable NVMe SSD bays in 1RU. It is designed for 4K, 6K and 8K uncompressed workflows using JPEG2000, DPX and multi-channel OpenEXR. There are 4TB of NVMe SSDs currently available, but a 16TB version will be available in later this year, allowing 576TB of Flash storage to fit in 1RU. Breathless performs 10 million random read IOPS (Input/Output Operations per Second) of storage performance (up to 475,000 per drive).

Each of the 36 NGSFF SSD bays connects to the motherboard directly over PCIe to deliver maximum potential performance. With dual Intel Skylake-SP CPUs and 24 DDR4 DIMMs of memory, this system is perfect for I/O intensive local workloads, not just for high-end VFX, but also realtime analytics, database and OTT content delivery servers.

Breathless’ OPMS features 24/7 monitoring, technical support and next-day repairs for an all-inclusive, affordable fixed monthly rate of $2,495.00, based on a three-year contract (16TB of SSD).

Breathless is the second Creative.Space system to launch, joining Auteur, which offers 120TB RAW capacity across 12 drives in a 24-bay 4 RU chassis. Every system is custom-built to address each client’s needs. Entry level systems are designed for small to medium workgroups using compressed 4K, 6K and 8K workflows and can scale for 4K uncompressed workflows (including 4K OpenEXR) and large multi-user environments.

DigitalGlue, an equipment, integration and software development provider, also designs and implements turnkey solutions for content creation, post and distribution.

 

Cinna 4.13

NAB: Imagine Products and StorageDNA enhance LTO and LTFS

By Jonathan S. Abrams

That’s right. We are still taking NAB. There was a lot to cover!

So, the first appointment I booked for NAB Show 2018, both in terms of my show schedule (10am Monday) and the vendors I was in contact with, was with StorageDNA’s Jeff Krueger, VP of worldwide sales. Weeks later, I found out that StorageDNA was collaborating with Imagine Products on myLTOdna, so I extended my appointment. Doug Hynes, senior director of business development for StorageDNA, and Michelle Maddox, marketing director of Imagine Products, joined me to discuss what they had ready for the show.

The introduction of LTFS during NAB 2010 allowed LTO tape to be accessed as if it was a hard drive. Since LTO tape is linear, executing multiple operations at once and treating it like a hard drive results in performance falling off of a cliff. It also could cause the drive to engage in shoeshining, or shuttling of the tape back-and-forth over the same section.

Imagine Products’ main screen.

Eight years later, these performance and operation issues have been addressed by StorageDNA’s creation of HyperTape, which is their enhanced Linear File Transfer System that is part of Imagine Products’ myLTOdna application. My first question was “Is HyperTape yet another tape format?” Fortunately for myself and other users, the answer is “No.”

What is HyperTape? It is a workflow powered by dnaLTFS. The word “enhanced” in the description of HyperTape as an enhanced Linear File Transfer System refers to a middleware in their myLTOdna application for Mac OS. There are three commands that can be executed to put an LTO drive into either read-only, write-only or training mode. Putting the LTO drive into an “only mode” allows it to achieve up to 300MB/s of throughput. This is where the Hyper in HyperTape comes from. These modes can also be engaged from the command line.

Training mode allows for analyzing the files stored on an LTO tape and then storing that information in a Random Access Database (RAD). The creation of the RAD can be automated using Imagine Products’ PrimeTranscoder. Otherwise, each file on the tape must be opened in order to train myLTOdna and create a RAD.

As for shoeshining, or shuttling of the tape back-and-forth over the same section, this is avoided by intelligently writing files to LTO tape. This intelligence is proprietary and is built into the back-end of the software. The result is that you can load a clip in Avid’s Media Composer, Blackmagic’s DaVinci Resolve or Adobe’s Premiere Pro and then load a subclip from that content into your project. You still should not load a clip from tape and just press play. Remember, this is LTO tape you are reading from.

The target customer for myLTOdna is a DIT with camera masters who wants to reduce how much time it takes to backup their footage. Previously, DITs would transfer the camera card’s contents to a hard drive using an application such as Imagine Products’ ShotPut Pro. Once the footage had been transferred to a hard drive, it could then be transferred to LTO tape. Using myLTOdna in read-only mode allows a DIT to bypass the hard drive and go straight from the camera card to an LTO tape. Because the target customer is already using ShotPut Pro, the UI for myLTOdna was designed to be comfortable and not difficult to use or understand.

The licensing for dnaLTFS is tied to the serial number of an LTO drive. StorageDNA’s Krueger explained that, “dnaLTFS is the drive license that works with stand alone mac LTO drives today.” Purchasing a license for dnaLTFS allows the user to later upgrade to StorageDNA’s DNAevolution M Series product if they need automation and scheduling features without having to purchase another drive license if the same LTO drive is used.

Krueger went on to say, “We will have (dnaLTFS) integrated into our DNAevolution product in the future.” DNAevolution’s cost of entry is $5,000. A single LTO drive license starts at $1,250. Licensing is perpetual, and updates are available without a support contract. myLTOdna, like ShotPut Pro and PrimeTranscoder, is a one-time purchase (perpetual license). It will phone home on first launch. Remote support is available for $250 per year.

I also envision myLTOdna being useful outside of the DIT market. Indeed, this was the thinking when the collaboration between Imagine Products and StorageDNA began. If you do not mind doing manual work and want to keep your costs low, myLTOdna is for you. If you later need automation and can budget for the efficiencies that you get with it, then DNAevolution is what you can upgrade to.


Jonathan S. Abrams is the Chief Technical Engineer at Nutmeg, a creative marketing, production and post resource, located in New York City.


Display maker TVLogic buys portable backup storage company Nexto DI

TVLogic, a designer and manufacturer of LCD and OLED high-definition displays, has acquired Nexto DI, a provider of portable field backup storage for digital cameras. They are located in South Korea.

Nexto DI uses the company’s patented “X-copy” technology, while M-copy (copy to multiple drives simultaneously), according to the company, guarantees 100% data safety, even in worst-case circumstances.

We reached out to TVLogic’s Denny An to find out more…

Why did it make sense for TVLogic to acquire Nexto DI?
TVLogic develops and manufactures broadcast and pro monitors that work in concert with other equipment. Because we compete on a global scale with large organizations that supply other products, such as cameras, switchers and more in addition to monitors, we realized we had to extend our offerings to better serve our customers and stay competitive. After a thorough search for companies that provide complementary products we found the perfect technology partner with Nexto DI.

We will continue our efforts to become a comprehensive broadcast and professional equipment company by searching for products and companies that can create synergy with our monitor technology.

How do you feel this fits in with what you already provide for the industry?
TVLogic has over 90 distributors and service networks around the world that can now also promote, sell and provide the same great quality service for the Nexto DI product line. Although the data backup is the main feature of the Nexto DI products, they also support image and video preview features. We’re confident that the combined technologies of TVLogic and Nexto DI will result in new monitor products with built-in recording features in the near future.


High-performance flash storage at NAB 2018

By Tom Coughlin

After years of watching the development of flash memory-based storage for media and entertainment applications, especially for post, it finally appears that these products are getting some traction. This is driven by the decreasing cost of flash memory and also the increase in 4K up to 16K workflows with high frame rates and multi-camera video projects. The performance demanded for working storage to support multiple UHD raw video streams makes high performance storage attractive. Examples of 8K workflows were everywhere at the 2018 NAB show.

Flash memory is the clear leader in professional video camera media, increasing from 19% in 2009 to 66% in 2015, 54% in 2016 and 59% in 2017. The 2017 media and entertainment professional survey results are shown below.

Flash memory capacity used in M&E applications is believed to have been about 3.1% in 2016, but will be larger in coming years. Overall, revenues for flash memory in M&E should increase by more than 50% in the next few years as flash prices go down and it becomes a more standard primary storage for many applications.

At the 2018 NAB Show, and the NAB ShowStoppers, there were several products geared for this market and in discussion with vendors it appears that there is some real traction for solid state memory for some post applications, in addition to cameras and content distribution. This includes solid-state storage systems built with SAS, SATA and the newer NVMe interface. Let’s look at some of these products and developments.

Flash-Based Storage Systems
Excelero reports that its NVMe software-defined block storage solution with its low-latency and high-bandwidth improves the interactive editing process and enables customers to stream high-resolution video without dropping frames. Technicolor has said that it achieved 99.8% of local NVMe storage server performance across the network in an initial use of Excelero’s NVMesh. Below is the layout of the Pixit Media Excelero demonstration for 8K+ workflows at the NAB show.

“The IT infrastructure required to feed dozens of workstations of 4K files at 24ps is mindboggling — and that doesn’t even consider what storage demands we’ll face with 8K or even 16K formats,” says Amir Bemanian, engineering director at Technicolor. “It’s imperative that we can scale to future film standards today. Now, with innovations like the shared NVMe storage such as Excelero provides, Technicolor can enjoy a hardware-agnostic approach, enabling flexibility for tomorrow while not sacrificing performance.”

Excelero was showcasing 16K post production workflows with the Quantum StorNext storage and data management platform and Intel on the Technicolor project and at Mellanox with its 100Gb Ethernet switch.

Storbyte, a company based in Washington, DC, was showing its Eco Flash servers at the NAB show. Their product featured hot-swappable and accessible flash storage bays and redundant hot-swappable server controllers. The product features the company’s Hydra Dispersed Algorithmic Modeling (HDAM) that allows them to avoid having a flash transition layer, garbage collection, as well as dirty block management resulting in less performance overhead. Their Data Remapping Accelerator Core (DRACO) is said to offer up to a 4X performance increase over conventional flash architectures that can maintain peak performance even at 100% drive capacity and life and thus eliminates a write cliff and other problems that flash memory is subject to.

DDN was showing its ExaScaler DGX solution that combined a DDN ExaScaler ES14KX high-performance all-flash array integrated with a single Nvidia DGX-1 GPU server (initially announced at the 2018 GPU Technology Conference). Performance of the combination achieved up to 33GB/s of throughput. The company was touting this combination to accelerate machine learning, reducing the load times of large datasets to seconds for faster training. According to DDN, the combination also allows massive ingest rates and cost-effective capacity scaling and achieved more than 250,000 random read 4K IOPS. In addition to HDD-based storage, DDN offers hybrid HDD/SSD as well as all-flash array products. The new DDN SFA200NV all-flash platform product was on display at the 2018 NAB show

Dell EMC was showing its Isilon F800 all-flash scale-out NAS for creative applications. According to the company, the Isilon all-flash array gives visual effects artists and editors the power to work with multiple streams of uncompressed, full-aperture 4K material, enabling collaborative, global post and VFX pipelines for episodic and feature projects.

 

Dell EMC said this allows a true scale-out architecture with high concurrency and super-fast all-flash network-attached storage with low latency for high-throughput and random-access workloads. The company was demonstrating 4K editing of uncompressed DPX files with Adobe Premiere using a shared Isilon F800 all-flash array. They were also showing 4K and UHD workflows with Blackmagic’s DaVinci Resolve.

NetApp had a focus on solid-state storage for media workflows in their “Lunch and Learn sessions,” co-hosted by Advanced Systerms Group (ASG). The sessions discussed how NVMe and Storage Class Memory (SCM) are reshaping the storage industry. NetApp provides SSD-based E-series products that are used in the media and entertainment industry.

Promise Technology had its own NVMe SSD-based products. The company had data sheets on two NVMe fabric products. One was an HA storage appliance in a 2RU form factor (NVF-9000) with 24 NVMe drive slots and 100GbE ports offering up to 15M IOPS and 40GB/s throughout and many other enterprise features. The company said that its fabric allows servers to connect to a pool of storage nodes as if they had local NVMe SSDs. Promise’s NVMe Intelligent Storage is a 1U appliance (NVF-7000) with multiple 100 GbE connectors offering up to 5M IOPS and 20GB/s throughput. Both products offer RAID redundancy and end-to-end RDMA memory access.

Qumulo was showing its Qumulo P-Series NVMe all-flash solution. The P-series combines Qumulo File Fabric (QF2) software with high-speed NVMe, Intel Skylake SP processors and high-bandwidth Intel SSDs and 100GbE networking. It offers 16GB/s in a minimum four-node configuration (4GB/s per node). The P-series nodes come in 23 and 92TB size. According to Qumulo, QF2 provides realtime visibility and control regardless of the size of the file system, realtime capacity quotas, continuous replication, support for both SMB and NFS protocols, complete programmability with REST API and fast rebuild times. Qumulo says the P-series can run on-premise or in the cloud and can create a data fabric that interconnects every QF2 cluster whether it is all-flash, hybrid SSD/HDD or running on EC2 instances in AWS.

AIC was at the show with its J2024-04 2U 24-bay NVMe all-flash array using a Broadcom PCIe switch. The product includes dual hot-swap redundant 1.3 KW power supplies. AIC was also showing this AFA product providing a Storage Software Fabric platform with EXTEN smart NICs using Broadcom chips to create a storage software fabric platform, as well as an NVMe JBOF.

Companies such as Luma Forge were showing various hierarchical storage options, including flash memory, as shown in the image below.

Some other solid-state products included the use of two SATA SSDs for performance improvements for the SoftIron HyperDrive Ceph-based object storage appliance. Scale Logic has a hybrid SSD SAN/NAS product called Genesis Unlimited, which can support multiple 4K streams with a combination of HDDs and SSDs. Another NVMe offering was the RAIDIX NVMEXP software RAID engine for building NVMe-based arrays offering 4M IOPS and 30GB/s per 1U and offering RAID levels 5, 6 and 7.3. Nexsan has all-flash versions of its Unity storage products. Pure Storage had a small booth in the back of the South Hall lower showing their flash array products. Spectra Logic was showing new developments in its flash-based Black Pearl product, but we will cover that in another blog.

External Flash Storage Products
Other World Computing (OWC) was showing its solid-state and HDD-based products. They had a line-up of Thunderbolt 3 storage products, including the ThunderBlade and the Envoy Pro EX (VE) with Thunderbolt 3. The ThunderBlade uses a combination of M.2 SSDs to achieve transfer speeds up to 2.8 GB/s read and 2.45 GB/s write (pretty symmetrical R/W) with 1TB to 8TB storage capacity. It is fanless and has a dimmable LED so it won’t interfere with production work. OWC’s mobile bus-powered SSD product, Envoy Pro EX (VE) with Thunderbolt 3 provides sustained data rates up to 2.6 GB/s read and 1.6 GB/s write. This small 1TB to 2TB drive can be carried in a backpack or coat pocket.

Western Digital and Seagate had external SSD drives they were showing. Below is shown the G-Drive Mobile SSD-R, introduced late in 2017.

Memory Cards and SSDs
Samsung was at the NAB showing their EVO 860 2.5-inch. These SATA SSDs provide up to 4TB capacity and 550MB/s sequential read and 520MB/s sequential write speeds for media workstation applications. However, there were also showings of the product used in all-flash arrays as shown below.

ProGrade was showing its line of professional memory cards for high-end digital cameras. These included their SFExpress 1.0 memory card with 1TB capacity and 1.4GB/s read data transfer speed as well as burst write speed greater than 1GB/s. This new Compact Flash standard is a successor to both the C FAST and XQD formats. The product uses two lanes of PCIe and includes NVMe support. The product is interoperable with the XQD form factor. They also announced their V90 premium line of SDXC UHS-II memory cards with sustained read speeds of up to 250MB/s and sustained write speeds up to 200MB/s.

2018 Creative Storage Conference
For those who love storage, the 12th Annual Creative Storage Conference (CS 2018) will be held on June 7 at the Double Tree Hotel West Los Angeles in Culver City. This event brings together digital storage providers, equipment and software manufacturers and professional media and entertainment end users to explore the conference theme: “Enabling Immersive Content: Storage Takes Off.”

Also, my company Coughlin Associate is conducting a survey of digital storage requirements and practices for media and entertainment professionals with results presented at the 2018 Creative Storage Conference. M&E professionals can participate in the survey through this link. Those who complete the survey, with their contact information, will receive a free full pass to the conference.

Our main image: Seagate products in an editing session, including products in a Pelican case for field work. 


Tom Coughlin is president of Coughlin Associates, a digital storage analyst and  technology consultant. He has over 35 years in the data storage industry. He is also the founder of the Annual Storage Visions Conference and the Creative Storage Conference.

 


NAB 2018: My key takeaways

By Twain Richardson

I traveled to NAB this year to check out gear, software, technology and storage. Here are my top takeaways.

Promise Atlas S8+
First up is storage and the Promise Atlas S8+. The Promise Atlas S8+ is a network attached storage solution for small groups that features easy and fast NAS connectivity over Thunderbolt3 and 10GB Ethernet.

The Thunderbolt 3 version of the Atlas S8+ offers two Thunderbolt 3 ports, four 1Gb Ethernet ports, five USB 3.0 ports and one HMDI output. The 10g BaseT version swaps in two 10Gb/s Ethernet ports for the Thunderbolt 3 connections. It can be configured up to 112TB. The unit comes empty, and you will have to buy hard drives for it. The Atlas S8+ will be available later this year.

Lumaforge

Lumaforge Jellyfish Tower
The Jellyfish is designed for one thing and one thing only: collaborative video workflow. That means high bandwidth, low latency and no dropped frames. It features a direct connection, and you don’t need a 10GbE switch.

The great thing about this unit is that it runs quiet, and I mean very quiet. You could place it under your desk and you wouldn’t hear it running. It comes with two 10GbE ports and one 1GbE port. It can be configured for more ports and goes up to 200TB. The unit starts at $27,000 and is available now.

G-Drive Mobile Pro SSD
The G-Drive Mobile Pro SSD is blazing-fast storage with data transfer rates of up to 2800MB/s. It was said that you could transfer as much as a terabyte of media in seven minutes or less. That’s fast. Very fast.

It provides up to three-meter drop protection and comes with a single Thunderbolt 3 port and is bus powered. It also features a 1000lb crush-proof rating, which makes it ideal for being used in the field. It will be available in May with a capacity of 500GB. 1TB and 2TB versions will be available later this year.

OWC Thunderblade
Designed to be rugged and dependable as well as blazing fast, the Thunderblade has a rugged and sleek design, and it comes with a custom-fit ballistic hard-shell case. With capacities of up 8TB and data transfer rates of up to 2800MB/s, this unit is ideal for on-set workflows. The unit is not bus powered, but you can connect two ThunderBlades that can reach speeds of up to 3800MB/s. Now that’s fast.

OWC Thunderblade

It starts at $1,199 for the 1TB and is available now for purchase.

OWC Mercury Helios FX External Expansion Chassis
Add the power of a high-performance GPU to your Mac or PC via Thunderbolt 3. Performance is plug-and-play, and upgrades are easy. The unit is quiet and runs cool, making it a great addition to your environment.

It starts at $319 and is available now.

Flanders XM650U
This display is beautiful, absolutely beautiful.

The XM650U is a professional reference monitor designed for color-critical monitoring of 4K, UHD, and HD signals. It features the latest large-format OLED panel technology, offering outstanding black levels and overall picture performance. The monitor also features the ability to provide a realtime downscaled HD resolution output.

The FSI booth was showcasing the display playing HD, UHD, and UHD HDR content, which demonstrates how versatile the device is.

The monitor goes for $12,995 and is available for purchase now.

DaVinci Resolve 15
What could arguably be the biggest update yet to Resolve is version 15. It combines editing, color correction, audio and now visual effects all in one software tool with the addition of Fusion. Other additions include ADR tools in Fairlight and a sound library. The color and edit page has additions such as a LUT browser, shared grades, stacked timelines, closed captioning tools and more.

You can get DR15 for free — yes free — with some restrictions to the software and you can purchase DR15 Studio for $299. It’s available as a beta at the moment.

Those were my top take aways from NAB 2018. It was a great show, and I look forward to NAB 2019.


Twain Richardson is a co-founder of Frame of Reference, a boutique post production company located on the beautiful island of Jamaica. Follow the studio and Twain on Twitter: @forpostprod @twainrichardson


Riding the digital storage bus at the HPA Tech Retreat

By Tom Coughlin

At the 2018 HPA Tech Retreat in Palm Desert there were many panels that spoke to the changing requirements for digital storage to support today’s diverse video workflows. While at the show, I happened to snap a picture of the Maxx Digital bus — these guys supply video storage and RAID. I liked this picture because it had the logos of a number of companies with digital storage products serving the media and entertainment industry. So, this blog will ride the storage bus to see where digital storage in M&E is going.

Director of photography Bill Bennett, ASC, and senior scientist for RealD Tony Davis gave an interesting talk about why it can be beneficial to capture content at high frame rates, even if it will ultimately be shown at much lower frame rate. They also offered some interesting statics about Ang Lee’s 2016 technically groundbreaking movie, Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk, which was shot in in 3D at 4K resolution and 120 frames per second.

The image above is a slide from the talk describing the size of the data generated in creating this movie. Single Sony F65 frames with 6:1 compression were 5.2MB in size with 7.5TB of average footage per day over 49 days. They reported that 104-512GB cards were used to capture and transfer the content and the total raw negative size (including test materials) was 404TB. This was stored on 1.5PB of hard disk storage. The actual size of the racks used for storage and processing wasn’t all that big. The photo below shows the setup in Ang Lee’s apartment.

Bennett and Davis went on to describe the advantages of shooting at high frame rates. Shooting at high frame rates gives greater on-set flexibility since no motion data is lost during shooting, so things can be fixed in post more easily. Even when shown at lower resolution in order to get conventional cinematic aesthetics, a synthetic shutter can be created with different motion sense in different parts of the frame to create effective cinematic effects using models for particle motion, rotary motion and speed ramps.

During Gary Demos’s talk on Parametric Appearance Compensation he discussed the Academy Color Encoding System (ACES) implementation and testing. He presented an interesting slide on a single master HDR architecture shown below. A master will be an important element in an overall video workflow that can be part of an archival package, probably using the SMPTE (and now ISO) Archive eXchange Format (AXF) standard and also used in a SMPTE Interoperable Mastering Format (IMF) delivery package.

The Demo Area
At the HPA Retreat exhibits area we found several interesting storage items. Microsoft had on exhibit one of it’s Data Boxes, that allow shipping up to 100 TB of data to its Azure cloud. The Microsoft Azure Data Box joins Amazon’s Snowball and Google’s similar bulk ingest box. Like the AWS Snowball, the Azure Data Box includes an e-paper display that also functions as a shipping label. Microsoft did early testing of their Data Box with Oceaneering International, which performs offline sub-sea oil industry inspection and uploaded their data to Azure using Data Box.

ATTO was showing its Direct2GPU technology that allowed direct transfer from storage to GPU memory for video processing without needing to pass through a system CPU. ATTO is a manufacturer of HBA and other connectivity solutions for moving data, and developing smarter connectors that can reduce overall system overhead.

Henry Gu’s GIC company was showing its digital video processor with automatic QC, and IMF tool set enabling conversion of any file type to IMF and transcoding to any file format and playback of all file types including 4K/UHD. He was doing his demonstration using a DDN storage array (right).

Digital storage is a crucial element in modern professional media workflows. Digital storage enables higher frame rate, HDR video recording and processing to create a variety of display formats. Digital storage also enables uploading bulk content to the cloud and implementing QC and IMF processes. Even SMPTE standards for AXF, IMF and others are dependent upon digital storage and memory technology in order to make them useful. In a very real sense, in the M&E industry, we are all riding the digital storage bus.


Dr. Tom Coughlin, president of Coughlin Associates, is a storage analyst and consultant. Coughlin has six patents to his credit and is active with SNIA, SMPTE, IEEE and other pro organizations. Additionally, Coughlin is the founder and organizer of the annual Storage Visions Conference as well as the Creative Storage Conference.
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AJA intros new 2TB Pak 2000 SSD recording media

AJA has expanded its line of Pak SSD media with the new 2TB Pak 2000 for Ki Pro Ultra and Ki Pro Ultra Plus recording and playback systems. The company also announced new ordering options for the entire Pak drive family, including HFS+ formatting for Mac OS users and exFAT for PC and universal use.

“With productions embracing high resolution, high frame rate and multi-cam workflows, media storage is a key concern. Pak 2000 introduces a high capacity recording option at a lower cost per GB,” says AJA president Nick Rashby. “Our new HFS+ and exFat options give customers greater flexibility with formatting upon ordering that fits their workflow demands.”

Pak 2000 offers longer recording capacity required for documentaries, news, sports programming and live events, making it suitable for multi-camera HD workflows with the Ki Pro Ultra Plus’s multi-channel HD recording capabilities. The high capacity drive can hold more than four hours of 4K/UltraHD ProRes (HQ), three hours of ProRes 4444 at 30p and up to two hours ProRes (HQ) or 90 minutes of ProRes 4444 at 60p.

Users can get double that length with two Pak drives and rollover support in Ki Pro Ultra and Ki Pro Ultra Plus.

The Pak 2000, and all Pak SSD media modules are now available for order in the following formats and prices:
– Pak 2000-R0 2TB HFS+: $1,795
– Pak 2000-X0 2TB exFAT: $1,795
– Pak 1000-R0 1TB HFS+: $1,495
– Pak 1000-X0 1TB exFAT: $1,495
– Pak 512-R1 512GB HFS+: $995
– Pak 512-X1 512GB exFAT: $995
– Pak 256-R1 256GB HFS+: $495
– Pak 256-X1 256GB exFAT: $495

(For HFS+ and X models for exFAT, order R models.)


The challenges of creating a shared storage ‘spec’

By James McKenna

The specification — used in a bid, tender, RFQ or simply to provide vendors with a starting point — has been the source of frustration for many a sales engineer. Not because we wish that we could provide all the features that are listed, but because we can’t help but wonder what the author of those specs was thinking.

Creating a spec should be like designing your ideal product on paper and asking a vendor to come as close as they can to that ideal. Unlike most other forms of shopping, you avoid the sales process until the salesperson knows exactly what you want. This is good in some ways, but very limiting in others.

I dislike analogies with the auto industry because cars are personal and subjective, but in this way, you can see the difference in spec versus evaluation and research. Imagine writing down all the things you want in a car and showing up at the dealership looking for a match. You want power, beauty, technology, sports-car handling and room for five?

Your chances of finding the exact car you want are slim, unless you’re willing to compromise or adjust your budget. The same goes for facility shared storage. Many customers get hung up on the details and refuse to prioritize important aspects, like usability and sustainability, and as a result end up looking at quotes that are two to three times their cost expectations for systems that don’t perform the day-to-day work any better (and often perform worse).

There are three ways to design a specification:

Based On Your Workflow
By far, this is the best method and will result in the easiest path to getting what you want. Go ahead and plan for years down the road and challenge the vendors to keep up with your trajectory. Keep it grounded in what you believe is important to your business. This should include data security, usable administration and efficient management. Lay out your needs for backup strategy and how you’d like that to be automated, and be sure to prioritize these requests so the vendor can focus on what’s most important to you.

Be sure to clearly state the applications you’ll be using, what they will be requiring from the storage and how you expect them to work with the storage. The highest priority and true test of a successful shared storage deployment is: Can you work reliably and consistently to generate revenue? These are my favorite types of specs.

Based On Committee
Some facilities are the victim of their own size or budget. When there’s an active presence from the IT department, or the dollar amounts get too high, it’s not just up to the creative folks to select the right product. The committee can include consultants, system administrators, finance and production management, and everyone wants to justify their existence at the table. People with experience in enterprise storage and “big iron” systems will lean on their past knowledge and add terms like “Five-9s uptime,” “No SPOF,” “single namespace,” “multi-path” and “magic quadrant.”

In the enterprise storage world these would be important, but they don’t force vendors to take responsibility for prioritizing the interactions between the creative applications and the storage, and the usability and sustainability of a solution in the long term. The performance necessary to smoothly deliver a 4K program master, on time and on budget, might not even be considered. I see these types of specifications and I know that there will be a rude awakening when the quotes are distributed, usually leading to some modifications of the spec.

Based On A Product
The most limiting way to design a spec is by copying the feature list of a single product to create your requirements. I should mention that I have helped our customers to do this on some occasions, so I’m guilty here. When a customer really knows the market, and wants to avoid being bid an inferior product, this can be justified. However, you have better completed your research beforehand because there may be something out there that could change your opinion, and you don’t want to find out about it after you’re locked into the status quo. If you choose to do this but want to stay on the lookout for another option, simply prioritize the features list by what’s most important to you.

If you really like something about your storage, prioritize that and see if another vendor has something similar. When I respond to these bid specs, I always provide details on our solution and how we can achieve better results than the one that is obviously being requested. Sometimes it works, sometimes not, but at least now they’re educated.

The primary frustration with specifications that miss the mark is the waste of money and time. Enterprise storage features come with enterprise storage complexity and enterprise storage price tags. This requires training or reliance upon the IT staff to manage, or in some cases completely control the network for you. Cost savings in the infrastructure can be repurposed to revenue-generating workstations and artists can be employed instead of full-time techs. There’s a reason that scrappy, grassroots facilities produce faster growth and larger facilities tend to stagnate. They focus on generating content, invest only where needed and scale the storage as the bigger jobs and larger formats arrive.

Stick with a company that makes the process easy and ensures that you’ll never be without a support person that knows your daily grind.


James McKenna is VP of marketing and sales at shared storage company Facilis.

Review: G-Tech’s G-Speed Shuttle XL with EV Series Adapters, Thunderbolt 3

By Brady Betzel

As video recording file sizes continue to creep up, so do our hard drive storage size, RAID and bandwidth needs. These days we are seeing a huge amount of recorded media needing to be offloaded, edited and color graded in the field. G-Technology has stepped up to bat with its 24TB G-Speed Shuttle XL with EV Series adapters, Thunderbolt 3 edition — a portable, durable, adaptable and hardware-RAID powered storage solution.

In terms of physical appearance, the G-Speed Shuttle XL is just shy of 10x7x16-inches and weighs in at around 25 pounds. It’s not exactly lightweight, but with spinning hard drives it’s what I would expect. To get a lighter RAID you would need SSD drives, but those would most likely triple the price. The case itself is actually pretty rugged; it seems like it could withstand a minimal amount of production abuse, but again without being an SSD RAID you have some risks since spinning disk drives are more volatile.

The exterior is made out of a hard plastic, and it would have been nice to have the rubberized feel on at least the handle of the Shuttle XL — similar to G-Tech’s Rugged line of drives — but it still feels solid. To open the Shuttle XL, there is an easy-to-access switch on the front. There is a lock switch that took me a few wiggles to work correctly, but I would loved to have seen a key lock that would to add a little more security since this RAID will most likely house important data. When closing the front door, the slide lock wouldn’t fully close unless I pushed hard a second time. If I didn’t do that the door would open by itself. On the back are the two Thunderbolt 3 ports, a power cable plug and a Kensington Lock slot. On the inside of this particular Shuttle XL are six 4TB 7200 RPM Enterprise Class HGST (Western Digital) drives configured to a RAID-5 by default and two EV Series Bay adapters.

Since I was on a Windows-based PC I had to download and format the drives since it comes formatted for Mac OS by default. The EV adapters allow for quick connection of memory products like Atomos Master Caddy drives, CFast 2.0 or even Red Mini Mags. This gives you fast connection on set for transferring and backing up your media without extra card readers. The HGST hard drives are enterprise class, which very simply means that the drives are rated to be run 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year more reliably than standard hard drives. This should do as it says, but if it doesn’t there is a five-year limited warranty that will back up this product. Basically, if the RAID or its drives fail due to craftsmanship errors, they will replace or repair it. Keep in mind, you are responsible for shipping the item back to them, and with the heavy weight of the RAID it may be costly if it goes bad. They will not cover accidental damage or misuse. Another caveat to G-Technology’s limited warranty is that they will not cover commercial use, so if you plan to use the G-Speed on a commercial shoot, you might not be covered. You should contact G-Technology’s support to check if your use will be covered: 1.888.426.5214 if you are in North or South America, including Canada.

The Shuttle XL comes pre-RAID formatted in a RAID-5 configuration for the Mac OS, but it can also be formatted as RAID-0,-1, -6, -10 and 50 using the G-Speed Studio Utility. Here is a quick RAID primer in case you forget the differences:

– RAID-0: All drives are used as one large drive. This gives you the fastest RAID performance.
– RAID-1: Total amount of drive space is halved, so if one drive goes out you will not lose your data and it will be rebuilt over time once the bad drive is replaced. The speed is slower than RAID 0. Essentially each drive is mirrored to an identical drive in the RAID.
– RAID-5: Needs at least three drives and uses each drive to create a safety net if a drive fails. The plus side is that it is faster than RAID-1 and includes a safety net. This is why G-Technology ships this drive with this configuration. You will have about 80% of usable disk space. The downside is that if a drive goes out you, will have degraded speed until the RAID fully repopulates itself once the bad drive is replaced.
– RAID-6: Works similar to RAID-5 but has two safety nets (a.k.a. parita blocks). One drawback of RAID-5 is that if a second drive goes out while the RAID database is rebuilding, all data can be lost permanently. RAID-6 adds another safety net so that if two drives go out you can still rebuild your RAID. The downside is that you have only 60% of your storage usable.
RAID-10: RAID-10 requires at least four drives and cuts your usable drive count in half. The upside is that if a drive goes out, you will not have degraded speed during the RAID rebuilding process, which depending on the data involved can be multiple days or longer. RAID-10 essentially mirrors a striped RAID.
– RAID-50: RAID-50 can be thought of as a RAID-5 + 0 and needs a minimum of six drives. It’s two RAID arrays running RAID-5. In each of those RAID arrays you will lose one drive’s worth of usable space. The good news is that if you can have a drive in each RAID array go out while minimizing total RAID loss unlink RAID-5 alone.

Those RAID formatting options are a lot to think about, and frankly I have to look them up about every year or so. If you didn’t read all about RAID formatting, then you may want to stick with RAID-5, which gives you a nice combo of safety vs. speed. If you are a risk taker, backup your data regularly, or if you can survive a total RAID failure, RAID-0 might be more your style. But in the end, keep in mind no matter how good your equipment is or how high a level of RAID protection you have, you can always suffer a total RAID failure and backups are always important.

I tested the 24TB Shuttle XL in each of the available RAID configurations on an HP ZBook Studio G4 with a Thunderbolt 3 interface using the AJA System Test Utility. Each test used the 4GB testing size, 3840×2160 resolution and DNxHR 444 codec since I typically use RAIDS when editing video or motion based projects, which tend to be higher file size. As a caveat, when I lowered the file size to 1GB the speeds increased tremendously. For instance, in RAID-0 the Read/Write speeds were 953MB/s/2274MB/s compare to those below. Here are my results, including the total size of the RAID:

RAID-0: 21.83TB – Read: 960 MB/s – Write: 1451 MB/s
RAID-1: 10.91TB – Read: 439 MB/s – Write: 639 MB/s
RAID-5: 18.19TB – Read: 950 MB/s – Write: 1171 MB/s ***
RAID-6: 14.55TB – Read: 683 MB/s – Write: 750 MB/s
RAID-10: 10.91TB – Read: 506 MB/s – Write: 667 MB/s
RAID-50: 14.55TB – Read: 614 MB/s – Write: 933 MB/s

***I pulled a drive while working live in RAID-5 and while the read/write speed degraded to Read: 326MB/s and Write: 858MB/s it continued to function while the RAID rebuilt itself.

For some reference I also ran the AJA System Test on my local hard drive and got Read 1606MB/s — Write 1108MB/s, which is pretty fast, so the Shuttle XL is doing well. I also wanted to test real-world copy speed and using 50GB of Cinema DNG files here are the results:

RAID-0: 2 mins. 7 seconds (~403 MB/s)
RAID-1: 3 mins. 35 seconds (~238 MB/s)
RAID-5: 2 mins. 49 seconds (~303 MB/s)
RAID-6: 3 mins. 6 seconds(~275 MB/s)
RAID-10: 3 mins. 17 seconds (~260 MB/s)
RAID-50: 2 mins. 45 seconds (~310 MB/s)

While these results are pretty self explanatory, when configured in RAID-5 they are pretty impressive. If you ran the tests continuously for a day you would probably see some variation on the average, maybe a little higher than what you see here. The speeds are pretty impressive, especially when considering a drive can give out and you can still be running at a pretty high bandwidth. Technically, G-Technology states that the Shuttle XL can reach a maximum transfer rate up to 1500MB/s — which I was close to hitting. This is very surprising since typically these specs are a little like miles-per-gallon on new cars but not in this case. I really appreciate that accuracy and think it will go a long way with consumers. In terms of other apps, I wasn’t running anything other than the AJA System Test, but I also did not shut down anything in the background so it is possible some background apps affected these transfer numbers, but I wouldn’t say they had a lot of influence, you should see similar results.

Summing Up
In the end, the G-Technology G-Speed Shuttle XL with EV Series Adapters Thunderbolt 3 Edition is a great choice for a RAID that might need to stand up to a little abuse in the field. The 24TB version of the Shuttle XL that connects using Thunderbolt 3 has a retail price of $2,799.95 with EV adapters being sold separately for between $99.95 and $199.95. The Shuttle XL is available from 24TB all the way up to 72TB, which will cost you $7,699.95.

If you like the idea of multiple RAID options, including ones that require more than four drives, the Shuttle XL has a decent price, a great build quality that should last you for years thanks to its Enterprise Class hard drives, and high bandwidth — the only thing better would be to load it with some SSD drives, but that could cost another $10,000 and would call for another review. Check out the Shuttle XL at G-Technologies website.


Brady Betzel is an Emmy-nominated online editor at Margarita Mix in Hollywood, working on Life Below Zero and Cutthroat Kitchen. You can email Brady at bradybetzel@gmail.com. Follow him on Twitter @allbetzroff.