Category Archives: post production

John Hughes, Helena Packer, Kevin Donovan open post collective

Three industry vets have combined to launch PHD, a Los Angeles-based full-service post collective. Led by John Hughes (founder of Rhythm & Hues), Helena Packer (VFX supervisor/producer) and Kevin Donovan (film/TV/commercials director), PHD works across the genres of VR/AR, independent films, documentaries, TV — including limited series and commercials. In addition to post production, including color grading, offline and online editorial, the visual effects and final delivery, they offer live-action production services. In addition to Los Angeles, PHD has locations in India, Malaysia and South Africa.

Hughes was the co-founder of the legendary VFX shop Rhythm & Hues (R&H) and led that studio for 26 years, earning three Academy Awards for “Best Visual Effects” (Babe, The Golden Compass, Life of Pi) as well as four scientific and engineering Academy Awards.

Packer was inducted into the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) in 2008 for her creative contributions to filmmaking as an accomplished VFX artist, supervisor and producer. Her expertise extends beyond feature films to episodic TV, stereoscopic 3D and animation. Packer has been the VFX supervisor and Flame artist for hundreds of commercials and over 20 films, including 21 Jump Street and Charlie Wilson’s War.

Director Kevin Donovan is particularly well-versed in action and visual effects. He directed the feature film, The Tuxedo, and is currently producing the TV series What Would Trejo Do? He has shot over 700 commercials during the course of his career and is the winner of six Cannes Lions.

Since the company’s launch, PHD has worked on a number of projects — two PSAs for the Climate Change organization 5 To Do Today featuring Arnold Schwarzenegger and James Cameron called Don’t Buy It and Precipice
a PSA for the international animal advocacy group WildAid shot in Tanzania and Oregon called Talking Elephant, another for WildAid shot in Cape Town, South Africa called Talking Rhino, and two additional WildAid PSAs featuring actor Josh Duhamel called Souvenir and Situation.

“In a sense, our new company is a reconfigured version of R&H, but now we are much smarter, much more nimble and much more results driven,” says Hughes about PHD. “We have very little overhead to deal with. Our team has worked on hundreds of award-winning films and commercials…”

Main Photo: L-R:  John Hughes, Helena Packer and Kevin Donovan.

The long, strange trip of Amir Bar-Lev’s new Dead doc

Deadheads take note — Long Strange Trip, director Amir Bar-Lev’s four-hour documentary on rock’s original jam band, the Grateful Dead, is now available for viewing. While the film had a theatrical release in New York and Los Angeles on May 26, the doc was made available on Amazon Video as a six-episode series.

L-R: Jack Lewars and Keith Jenson.

Encompassing the band’s rise and decades-long career, the film, executive produced by Martin Scorsese, was itself 14 years in the making. That included three months of final post at Technicolor PostWorks New York, where colorist Jack Lewars and online editor Keith Jenson worked with Bar-Lev to finalize the film’s form and look.

The documentary features scores of interviews conducted by Bar-Lev with band members and their associates, as well as a mountain of concert footage and other archival media. All that made editorial conforming complex as Jenson (using Autodesk Flame) had to keep the diverse source material organized and make it fit properly into a single timeline. “We had conversions that were made from old analog tapes, archival band footage, DPX scans from film and everything in between,” he recalls. “There was a lot of cool stuff, which was great, but it required attention to detail to ensure it came out nice and smooth.”

The process was further complicated as creative editorial was ongoing throughout post. New material was arriving constantly. “We do a lot of documentary work here, so that’s something we’re used to,” Jenson says. “We have workflows and failsafes in place for all formats and know how to translate them for the Lustre platform Jack uses. Other than the sheer amount, nothing took us by surprise.”

Lewars faced a similar challenge during grading as he was tasked with bringing consistency to material produced over a long period of time by varying means. The overall visual style, he says, recalls the band’s origins in the psychedelic culture of the 1960s. “It’s a Grateful Dead movie, so there are a lot of references to their experiments with drugs,” he explains. “Some sections have a trippy feel where the visuals go in and out of different formats. It almost gives the viewer the sense of being on acid.”

The color palette, too, has a psychedelic feel, reflecting the free-spirited essence of the band and its co-founder. “Jerry Garcia’s life, his intention and his outlook, was to have fun,” Lewars observes. “And that’s the look we embraced. It’s very saturated, very colorful and very bright. We tried to make the movie as fun as possible.”

The narrative is frequently punctuated by animated sequences where still photographs, archival media and other elements are blended together in kaleidoscopic patterns. Finalizing those sequences required a few extra steps. “For the animation sequences, we had to cut in the plates and get them to Jack to grade,” explains Jenson. “We’d then send the color-corrected plates to the VFX and animation department for treatment. They’d come back as completed elements that we’d cut into the conform.”

The documentary climaxes with the death of Garcia and its aftermath. The guitarist suffered a heart attack in 1995 after years of struggling with diabetes and drug addiction. As those events unfold, the story undergoes a mood change that is mirrored in shifts in the color treatment. “There is a four-minute animated sequence in the last reel where Jerry has just passed and they are recapping the film,” Lewars says. “Images are overlaid on top of images. We colored those plates in hyper saturation, pushing it almost to the breaking point.

“It’s a very emotional moment,” he adds. “The earlier animated sequences introduced characters and were funny. But it’s tied together at the end in a way that’s sad. It’s a whiplash effect.”

Despite the length of the project and the complexity of its parts, it came together with few bumps. “Supervising producer Stuart Macphee and his team were amazing,” says Jenson. “They were very well organized, incredibly so. With so many formats and conversions coming from various sources, it could have snowballed quickly, but with this team it was a breeze.”

Lewars concurs. Long Strange Trip is an unusual documentary both in its narrative style and its looks, and that’s what makes it fascinating for Deadheads and non-fans alike. “It’s not a typical history doc,” Lewars notes. “A lot of documentaries go with a cold, bleach by-pass look and gritty feel. This was the opposite. We were bumping the saturation in parts where it felt unnatural, but, in the end, it was completely the right thing to do. It’s like candy.”

You can binge it now on Amazon Video.

Dell 6.15

Pixelogic acquires Sony DADC NMS’ creative services unit

Pixelogic, a provider of localization and distribution services, has completed the acquisition of the creative services business unit of Sony DADC New Media Solutions, which specializes in 4K, UHD, HDR and IMF workflows for features and episodics. The move brings an expansion of Pixelogic’s significant services to the media and entertainment industry and provides additional capabilities, including experienced staff, proprietary technology and an extended footprint.

According to John Suh, co-president of Pixelogic, the acquisition “expands our team of expert media engineers and creative talent, extends our geographic reach by providing a fully established London operation and further adds to our capacity and capability within an expansive list of tools, technologies, formats and distribution solutions.”

Seth Hallen

Founded less than a year ago, Pixelogic currently employs over 240 worldwide and is led by industry veterans Suh and Rob Seidel. While the company is headquartered in Burbank, California, it has additional operations in Culver City, California, London and Cairo.

Sony DADC NMS Creative Services was under the direction of Seth Hallen, who joins Pixelogic as senior VP of business development and strategy. All Sony DADC NMS Creative Services staff, technology and operations are now part of Pixelogic. “Our business model is focused on the deep integration of localization and distribution services for movies and television products,” says Hallen. “This supply chain will require significant change in order to deliver global day and date releases with collapsed distribution windows, and by partnering closely with our customers we are setting out to innovate and help lead this change.”


Senior producer Bill Galusha joins Leviathan

Bill Galusha joins Chicago-based digital and creative agency Leviathan as senior producer. Over the past several years, Galusha has produced and curated projects for Google, NASA, Nike, VICE and YouTube. He is a former producer at Bot & Dolly (and its sister company Autofuss), Google and Obscura.

In 2016, VICE’s arts and culture platform, The Creators Project, launched “Future Forward,” a nationwide series of events featuring original artworks from internationally renowned studios. Galusha was the series’ curator and executive producer. A year earlier, he and his team helped design and fully fabricate Prismatic NYC, a permanent kinetic sculpture that hovers just above NYC’s Highline Park.

“Bill’s breadth of hands-on experience producing content and interaction for environments is unmatched,” says Leviathan president Chad Hutson. “We’re talking robots, mirrors, lasers, projection-mapping, military-grade hardware, and beautiful imagery — all designed for physical environments.”


Post producer Tony Rucker joins Dallas-based 3008 Editorial

Post producer Tony Rucker has joined Dallas-based editorial boutique 3008. He brings over a decade of post experience including work on commercial campaigns, branded content, 3D animation and visual effects projects.

Before joining 3008, Rucker worked as a post producer at Post Asylum, Element X and Fast Cuts. Clients have included Visionworks, The Salvation Army, Atmos Energy, Mott’s and others.

This past year, owner and editor Brent Herrington assumed sole ownership of 3008. While editorial remains the company’s main focus, Herrington has expanded its editorial roster and turnkey production arm under his leadership. “As we see our clients needs evolve, we want to ensure that we too are evolving as a company to offer the talent, comprehensive services and a seamless experience,” he says.

Recent 3008 projects include work for AT&T, Chrysler, Cricket Wireless, McDonald’s, Top Golf, Snapple, Universal Orlando, Bridgestone and Frito-Lay.


Assistant Editor’s Bootcamp coming to Burbank in June

The new Assistant Editors’ Bootcamp, founded by assistant/lead editors Noah Chamow (The Voice) and Conor Burke (America’s Got Talent), is a place for a assistant editors and aspiring assistants to learn and collaborate with one another in a low-stakes environment. The next Assistant Editors’ Bootcamp classes will be held on June 10-11, along with a Lead Assistant Editors’ class geared toward understanding troubleshooting and system performance on June 24-25. All classes, sponsored by AlphaDogs’ Editor’s Lounge, will be held at Skye Rentals in Burbank.

The classes will cover such topics as The Fundamentals of Video, Media Management, Understanding I/O and Drive Speed, Prepping Footage for Edit, What’s New in Media Composer, Understanding System Performance Bottlenecks and more. Cost is $199 for two days for the Assistant Editor class, and $299 for two days for the Lead Assistant Editor class. Space is on a first-come, first-served basis and is limited to 25 participants per course. You can register here.

A system with Media Composer 8.6 or later and an external hard drive is required to take the class (30-day Avid trial available) 8GB of system memory and Windows 7/OS X 10.9 or later are needed to run Media Composer 8.6. Computer rentals are available for as little as $54 a week from Hi-Tech Computer Rental in Burbank.

Chamow and Burke came up with the idea for Assistant Editors’ Bootcamp when they realized how challenging it is to gain any real on-the-job experience in today’s workplace. With today’s focus being primarily on doing things faster and more efficiently, it’s almost impossible to find the time to figure out why one method of doing something is faster than another. Having worked extensively in reality television and creating the “The Super Grouper,” a multi-grouping macro for Avid that is now widely used in reality post workflows, Chamow understands first-hand the landscape of the assistant editor’s world. “One of the most difficult things about working in the entertainment industry, especially in a technical position, is that there is never time to learn,” he says. “I’m very passionate about education and hope by hosting these classes, I can help other assistants hone their skills as well as helping those who are new to the business get the experience they need.”

Having worked as both an assistant editor and lead assistant editor, Burke has created workflows and overseen post for up to 10 projects at a time, before moving into his current position at NBC’s America’s Got Talent. “In my years of experience and working on grueling deadlines, I completely understand how difficult the job of an assistant editor can be, having little or no time to learn anything other than what’s right in front of you,” he says. “In teaching this class, I hope to make peers feel more confident and have a better understanding in their work, taking them to the next level in their careers.”

Main Image (L-R): Noah Chamow and Conor Burke.


postPerspective Impact Award winners from NAB 2017

In early April, postPerspective announced the debut of our Impact Awards, celebrating innovative products and technologies for the post production and production industries that will influence the way people work. Our inaugural awards honor the best new or upgraded gear shown at NAB 2017.

Now that the show is over, and our panel of post pro judges has had time to decompress, dig out and think about what impressed them, we are happy to announce our honorees.

And the winners of the postPerspective Impact Award from NAB 2017 are:

• Adobe — Creative Cloud Suite
• Avid — Media Composer | Cloud Remote
• Blackmagic Design — DaVinci Resolve 14
• Dell — UltraSharp 27 4K HDR Monitor
• HP — DreamColor Z31x Studio Display

“The postPerspective Impact Award celebrates companies that have listened to users’ wants and needs and then produced tools designed to make their working lives easier and projects better,” said Randi Altman, postPerspective’s founder and editor-in-chief. “And all of our winners certainly fall into that category.

“Our awards are special because they are voted on by people who will be potentially using these tools in their day-to-day workflows. It’s real-world users who have determined our winners, and that is the way it should be. We feel awards for products targeting pros should be voted on by pros.”

Obviously, there were many new technologies and products at NAB this year, and while only five won an Impact Award, our judges felt there were other tools that it was important to let people know about as well.

Displays for high-resolution workflows were of special interest to many of our judges. In addition to our winners, they pointed to Sony’s CLEDIS, Bravia and XBR displays; SmallHD’s Focus monitor; Eizo’s Color Edge monitors; and Flanders Scientific’s OLED 55-inch HDR display.

Other gear that caught our judges attention — AJA’s FS HDR with ColorFront; Telestream Wirecast with Cloud-Assist captioning; Avid Pro Tools with Dolby Atmos integration; IBM Watson for post production; Mettle’s 360 Degree/VR Depth plug-ins and Skybox Studio v2; G-Tech’s Thunderbolt 3 Shuttle XL; AJA’s KiPro Ultra Plus; and The Foundry’s Nuke 11 and Elara.

Stay tuned for future Impact Award winners in the coming months — voted on by users for users — from SIGGRAPH and IBC.

FMPX8.14

Tips for future NAB-goers

By Jesse Korosi

Depart from the traditional flashing lights of Las Vegas, the ringing of slot machines and the smell of stale cigarettes and you may find yourself at the NAB show. Boasting over 103,000, this year’s NAB brought together media, entertainment and technology experts from around the globe.

 

Sim Digital always attends NAB, where we get inspiration for how we will continue to move ahead with new technology and industry trends. We have been growing as a company at an incredible rate — from the small team we once were only about 10 years back to our current crew of 400 and taking on the biggest jobs the industry has to offer. To ensure we keep this momentum, we need to keep our eyes on the fads and determine what technology is actually going to stick and choose which of them to become a leader in.

The convention center is massive! Therefore, do not make the same mistake I did the first time I went and walk into any entrance not knowing the types of vendors are in each hall. You could find yourself lost within radio or live broadcast land for an hour before finding your way out. Without proper maps and documentation, it can be a little overwhelming!

Download the NAB Show App on the App Store
This app will allow you to type in the booth number for any booth you want to hit and will draw a line across the NAB floor to navigate you. Without this map you are looking for the proverbial needle in a haystack, as it’s unfortunately not as simple as one might think to look at the booth number you’re standing at and figure out which way to go by counting. I tried that my first year and it was a nightmare.

Wear Comfortable Shoes and Book Meetings!
While there are a ton of booths and opportunities to just walk in and chat with anyone, it is very important to book your meetings well ahead of time! The first year I went, I did not book any meetings and I just showed up at booths. Because of this I often had random sales people greeting me. They were, of course, equipped to show me the new products they were showcasing. However, if I wanted to talk about the mechanics of how their hardware actually worked and the metadata management end of things, this was a no-go!

Rather than just looking at my meetings as an opportunity to see new products, I tend to look at this as an opportunity to jam-pack meetings into a few days of NAB that would otherwise take a month to schedule. As an example, this year I had meetings every 30 to 45 minutes all day, every day I was there! To prepare for this, my team and I from Bling — part of the Sim Group group of of companies —sent a simple e-mail to the vendor requesting the meeting. Within this e-mail, we explained why we wanted the meeting and requested a person who could answer our questions.

We also offered up sample material for the vendors to have on hand. An example of this would be our meeting with The Foundry (left) this year. I knew I wanted to go over VFX color science and pipelines so I forwarded on some sample media, including CDLs, LUTs, stills and anything else they would need to prepare for our meeting. This way, when we showed up, their artist had everything pre-loaded, they knew what we were there to talk about and within 30 minutes we had a super-productive meeting and were out the door.

For my team at Bling, we try not to think of this as only an opportunity to see new products, but to also get this one-on-one training. As a dailies lab, we are often supporting visual effects workflows, as any time a VFX vendor submits a shot back to editorial that does not properly match the original dailies color or framing, we are often the first call that the client makes. Considering this, it was great to get this one-on-one time at NAB with a company like The Foundry. Not only did our team get some hands-on time with Nuke, mirroring workflows our clients run, but we also came up with some very exciting concepts to elevate our VFX pull workflow to a new level.

Bring an iPad as a Visual Aid
I usually try to think about each meeting I have and ensure that if pictures of my office, gear, workflow diagrams, etc. may help as visual aids, I have them with me on a big enough screen to easily share.

Book Meetings Based on Hall Location
All of my South Upper hall meetings are together, etc. The last thing you want is to be running from one end of the massive facility to another, over and over. So this is something to keep in mind considering how much of an affect this will have on your ability to cram in as many meetings as possible.

The South Hall

With many members from the Sim team present at NAB, we were able to divide and concur the show floor. We certainly found many products that caught our attention and will be on our radar moving forward.

Aside from just new hardware and software, however, NAB this year has inspired a lot of workflow innovation that we are very excited to pursue. My team and I combined up our time at NAB with our annual planning session in a house off the Vegas strip. I feel it is very common for companies to have their technically minded crew buried in their daily routine, keeping up with the onslaught of work and never properly disengaging to reassess where the company has gone, what you are doing right and what could use some re-direction.

The executive-level staff may do this at other companies, but wouldn’t it be better if you had the technical creative minds who are dealing with the company’s challenges hands-on every day lead some of this charge? Or is this a task too heavy for this level position? That to me is what is very exciting about Sim — we do this every year and trust our people to make these calls. Combining this with the creative energy we were able to get from NAB brought our innovation concepts and technical strategies to a whole new level, which I am very excited to soon reveal!

The show wrapped at the end of last month. New products and road maps have been revealed and now the real question is: What will everyone do with this new information they gathered?

What Impressed
There were many updates that struck home for me, such as FilmLight making a Baselight student version; Blackmagic’s new panels; a new HP Dreamcolor and new HDR monitors from Sony and Flanders; AJA’s new KiPro Ultra Plus; Avids DNxIQ; Pro Tools native Dolby Atmos mixing and Nexis support; Blackmagic’s Resolve 14, Web Presenter, Ultra Studio HD Mini; and ColorFront HDR upgrades.

I figured that there would be a big focus on VR this year, as well as HDR, which was in fact the case. However, one thing that was very exciting to me was the focus on computer learning. This is an area I feel is going to continue to expand and gain more presence in the back-end architecture of software we use every day in post production. GrayMeta had a great demo of their new product. Check out what they do.


Jesse Korosi is director of workflow services at Bling Digital, is a member of the Sim Group family of companies, which supplies production equipment, workflow and post solutions.


Life is but a Streambox

By Jonathan Abrams

My interest in Streambox originated with their social media publishing capabilities (Facebook Live, YouTube Live, Twitter). I was shuttled to an unsecured, disclosed location (Suite 28140 at The Venetian) for a meeting with Tony Taylor (business development manager) and Bob Hildeman (CEO), where they were conducting user-focused presentations within a quiet and relaxing setting.

The primary use for Streambox in post production is live editorial and color review. Succinctly, it’s WebEx for post. A majority of large post production facilities use Streambox for live review services. It allows remote editorial and color grading over the public Internet with Mezzanine quality.

The process starts with either a software or hardware encoder. With the software encoder, you need to have your own I/O. As Bob mentioned this, he reached for a Blackmagic Design Mini Converter. The software encoder is limited to 8 bits. They also have two hardware encoders that occupy 1 RU. One of these can work with 4K video, and a new one shipping in June that uses a new version of their codec and works with 2K video. The 2K encoder will likely receive a software upgrade eventually that will enable it to work with 4K. All of their hardware encoders operate at 10 bit with 4:2:2 sampling and have additional post-specific features which include; genlock, frame sync, encryption and IFB audio talkback capabilities. Post companies offering remote color grading services are using a hardware encoder.

Streambox uses a proprietary ACT (Advanced Compression Technology) L3/L4 codec and LDMP (Low Delay Multi Path) protocol. For HD and 2K contribution over the Public Internet, their claim is that the ACT-L3/L4 codec is more bandwidth- and picture quality- efficient than H.264 (AVC), H.265 (HEVC), and JPEG2000. The low, and most importantly, sustained latency of the codec is in the use of LDMP (Low Delay Mutipath) video transport. The software and hardware decoders have about two seconds of latency, while the web output (browser) latency is 10 seconds. You can mix and match encoders and decoders. Put another way, you could use a hardware encoder and a software decoder.

TCP (Transmission Control Protocol), which is used for HTTP data transfer, is designed to have the receiving device confirm with the sender that it received packets. This creates packet redundancy overhead that reduces how much bandwidth you have available for data transmission.

Recovered packets in FEC display artifacts (macro blocking, buffering) when network saturation becomes problematic during playback. This does not generally effect lower bandwidth streams that use caching topology for network delivery, but for persistent streaming of video over 4Mbps this problem becomes apparent because of the large bandwidth that is needed for high-quality contribution content. UDP (User Datagram Protocol) eliminates this overhead at the cost of packets that were not delivered being unrecoverable. Streambox is using UDP to send its data and the decoder can detect and request lost packets. This keeps the transmission overhead low while eliminating lost packets. If you do have to limit your bandwidth, you can set a bitrate ceiling and not have to consider overhead. Streambox supports AES128 encryption as an add-on, and the number of bits can be higher (192 or 256).

Streambox Cloud allows the encoder to connect to the geographically closest cloud out of 10 sites available and have the data travel in the cloud until it reaches what is called the last mile to the decoder. All 10 cloud sites use Amazon Web Services, and two of those cloud sites also use Microsoft Azure. The cloud advantage in this situation is the use of global transport services, which minimize the risk of bandwidth loss while retaining quality.

Streambox has a database-driven service called Post Cloud that is evolving from broadcast-centric roots. It is effectively a v1 system, with post-specific reports and functionality added and broadcast-specific options stripped away. This is also where publishing to Facebook Live, YouTube Live and Twitter happens. After providing your live publishing credentials, Streambox manages the transcoding for the selected service. The publishing functionality does not prevent select users from establishing higher quality connections. You can have HQ streams to hardware and software decoders running simultaneously with a live streaming component.

The cloud effectively acts as a signal router to multiple destinations. Streamed content can be recorded and encrypted. Other cloud functionality includes realtime stitching of Ricoh Theta S camera outputs for 360º video.


Jonathan Abrams is Chief Technical Engineer at NYC’s Nutmeg Creative.

A virgin’s view of NAB

By Nolan Jennings

I have a confession: I am 28 years old, have lived in Los Angeles for over six years and had not been to Las Vegas until this past week. My naiveté concerning Las Vegas is generally a well-kept secret among my millennial peers, who seem to consider a debaucherous Las Vegas weekend a requisite validation of 21st century American life.

In addition, this was my first experience attending the National Association of Broadcasters convention (NAB). The simultaneous exposure to these two monolithic experiences was almost too great to bear, but I can happily report that I am safely back in Los Angeles, giddily recalling all of the incredible experiences I had over the course of the past four days.

Below, I’d love to share with you some background on how I arrived at NAB, and a few of the cool things I witnessed there.

How I Got There: An Introduction to Blue Collar Post Collective
I would not have been able to attend NAB without the wonderful generosity of the Blue Collar Post Collective (BCPC). For those not aware, BCPC is an organization of post production artists. Initially founded in New York City, BCPC has branched out to Los Angeles in recent years, and now boasts a bi-coastal membership representing every facet of the post industry.

Here I am (center) with the two other BCPC members who were sent to NAB: Eugene Vernikov and Tara Pennington.

BCPC hosts networking events as well as educational seminars, connecting various arms of the industry in order to promote awareness across all the various spectrums of the post industry including editorial, motion graphics, VFX, colorists, etc. If you haven’t been to one of these events, do yourself a favor and go to their website or sign up on the BCPC Facebook page to learn more and find their next one.

In addition to educational seminars, they are now offering the Professional Development Accessibility Program (PDAP), which assists folks like me who would not otherwise be able to take advantage of opportunities like NAB. Through this program, myself and two other talented post pros were able to travel to Las Vegas, stay there for four days and take advantage of quite literally every opportunity available.

PART 1: Arrival
We touched down at McCarran International Airport. I exited the gate and was immediately confronted with slot machines. Slot Machines! In the terminal! Any illusions I had about my peers’ exaggerations of Vegas were immediately decimated. Thus initiated, I hired a cab to take me to the front steps of the Las Vegas Convention Center. The car pulled up, and I was struck again by Vegas bravado. A giant window wrap advertising DaVinci Resolve 14 covered the entire face of the South Hall. Hoards of attendees streamed toward the entrance sporting their NAB badges. I emerged from the cab and trepidly joined them, holding my backpack close and clutching my pre-registered badge.

Once inside the South Hall I headed for a talk hosted by Rob Legato, the three-time Oscar-winning VFX supervisor whose most recent win was for John Favreau’s adaption of The Jungle Book. Say what you will about the movie in a narrative construct, but I dare anyone to challenge its visual sophistication. Legato talked candidly about the process required to bring the movie to life and showed extensive clips that revealed the extent of previs that preceded actual production, which was completed entirely on sound stages in downtown Los Angeles.

In particular, he emphasized the advent of virtual previsualization, and the benefits this process can provide to not only big-budget productions, but also micro projects due to the ease of use and rapidly sinking costs of HD cameras and previs software. The chance to witness those evolutions in Legato’s talk was a quantum leap forward in my understanding of the current state of affairs in post.

Following Legato’s presentation, I attended talks and classes with experts in various fields, such as motion graphics, virtual and augmented reality, and machine learning before finally checking into my hotel and attending a BCPC meet-up.

Part 2: NAB’s Show Floor
On the morning of day two I returned to the convention center and began to truly acquaint myself with the show. NAB is roughly divided into three types of experiences.

You could arguably spend your entire time walking the show floor (and accumulating thousands of Fit-bit steps). The variety of technology was absolutely astounding, and experts from each company was on hand to answer any questions you might have. The VR and AR demonstrations were some of the most fun to play with. Studios such as Digital Domain and companies like Nokia with its Ozo camera are making some terrific advances in the field, particularly in the realm of live-event VR broadcasting.

Another stand out was Adobe and its Character Animator, an animation application that uses facial recognition technology to animate an illustration based on the acting you perform in front of your computer’s camera. If you have a creative cloud subscription, this comes bundled with After Effects, and I highly recommend playing around with it. You don’t need any experience with animation in order to have a blast playing with Character Animator.

The Classes
There were also many classes taught during NAB, covering everything from HTML 5 animations to motion graphics to assistant editing in TV/film and beyond. The classes were taught by experts in their respective fields who were all very happy to answer questions and talk after the sessions were done.

I spent much of my time learning the various tools used in documentary editing, After Effects tricks and how video can be creatively and interactively incorporated into HTML 5 using cinemagraphs and other techniques. I knew many of the instructors from online tutorials and sites such as School of Motion. It was a very nerdy sort of star-struck feeling.

The Panels
Earlier I mentioned Rob Legato’s talk on The Jungle Book. His presentation was extraordinary, but it was only one of many amazing panels. Stand-outs included the editorial team from the new movie Logan, who spoke at length about their experience working on the movie. From pre-production to dailies ingest to test screenings to final delivery, their insights into the art of editing were enthralling. They showed several clips and discussed the various stages of the cut, as well as the discussions and even arguments that occurred over certain choices made in the edit. For an assistant editor such as myself who aspires to work on a project like Logan, this was a very special experience.

Other panels covered the emerging distribution landscape in VR entertainment, the cinematic innovations required to bring Ghost in the Shell to life, and a presentation of Big Little Lies hosted by Avid. These talks were indispensable elements of my NAB experience, and I’ll be going over the notes I took for months to come.

Part 3: Vendors
Through the auspices of Blue Collar Post Collective as well as postPerspective, I was able to meet with a few particular vendors who gave me a comprehensive tour of their new products.

One of these was Christie, In the world of post, there is always a heavy focus on the tools that allow us to create wonderful content, but there is often little attention paid to the tools that shepherd that content into the eyes of audiences around the world. What good is a finely crafted story if it never reaches an audience, or reaches an audience in the wrong way? Christie offers an impressive line-up of industry leading projectors. If you have doubts as to the quality of their product, look no further than James Cameron’s endorsement. He’s using their RGB laser projection series to ensure his images are up to snuff.

JMR have been creating storage solutions for years, and their innovations continue to push the boundaries of speed and mobility for post pros. As an example, their Lightning LTNG-XD-8-MMDT uses a Mac mini integration to power an extremely fast and portable system that can provide up to 64TB of native disk storage capacity for your DI cart or other on-site production workflows.

I was lucky enough to attend Canon’s NAB 2017 dinner, where Canon showed its guests their new Compact-Servo lenses — 4K Super 35mm lenses that deliver the quality of cinema lenses at a fraction of the price and with all the ease of use that you typically associate with photography lenses. Additionally, they showed footage of the aurora borealis shot in Alaska, and the images they were able to get in an incredibly low-light environment were astounding, with extremely little noise in the image. I personally have been using Canon DSLRs for years, and this presentation convinced me that my love for Canon won’t be ending anytime soon.

Part 3: Au Revoir
The finale in my NAB experience was the 16th Annual Las Vegas SuperMeet, with presentations by Blackmagic, Adobe, HP and many others. These presentations were punctuated by raucous raffle announcements, with winners running up to the stage with their ticket in hand, jumping and screaming in delight as they walked away with some seriously valuable prizes, including a full DaVinci Resolve system.

These events were impressive, but the highlight for me was an interview with Dody Dorn, ACE, editor of many of my favorite films, including Memento. Her insights into the craft of editing were extraordinary. She focused entirely on character and storytelling, answering questions with a sense of humor and humility that belied her extreme talents and accomplishments.

I walked away from the SuperMeet wishing I could stay at NAB for the entire week. Unfortunately, duty called. I was on my way to the airport, back to Los Angeles where a list of director notes sat in my editing bay, ready to be addressed. I can’t emphasize enough how impactful the NAB experience was. My perspective on our industry shifted radically, and my knowledge base expanded more in four days than over the past year. I look forward to returning next year, the year after that, and so on. Au revoir NAB — see you next time.
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Nolan Jennings is an LA-based assistant editor currently working on Season 5 of The Fosters or Freeform.