Category Archives: post production

Nutmeg adds Broadway Video’s former design group

New York City-based Nutmeg, a creative marketing and post production house, has acquired Broadway Video’s design team formerly known as FAC5. Under the Nutmeg brand, they are now known as NTMG Design.

The team of four — executive creative producer Doug LeBow, executive creative director Fred Salkind, creative director David Rogers and art director Karolina Dawson — is an Emmy, Telly and PromaxBDA award-winning creative collective working on design across multiple media platforms. Existing clients that could benefit from the new services include broadcast networks, cable channels and brands.

With services that include main titles and show packaging, experiential and event design, promotions and image campaigns, the group has worked with a variety of clients on a wide range of projects, including Nickelodeon HALO Awards; Nickelodeon Kids’ Choice Awards; The Emmys for Don Mischer Productions; Indy 500 100th Anniversary for ESPN; HBO’s Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony for Line-by-Line Productions; Thursday Night Football and Sunday Night Football tune-in promo packaging for CBS Sports; AT&T Concert Series for iHeart Media; The Great Human Race for National Geographic Channel; The Peabody Awards for Den of Thieves and others.

“Nutmeg has always embraced growth,” says Nutmeg executive producer Laura Vick. “As our clients and the marketplace shift to engage end users, the addition of a full-service design team allows us to offer all aspects of content creation under one roof. We can now assist at the inception of an idea to help create complete visual experiences — show opens, trade shows, corporate interiors or digital billboards.”

“We look at these new design capabilities as both a new frontier unto itself, and as yet another component of what we’re already doing — telling compelling stories,” says Nutmeg executive creative director Dave Rogan. “Nothing at Nutmeg is created in a vacuum, so these new areas of design crossing over into an interactive web environment, for example, is natural.”

The new NTMG Design team will be working within Nutmeg’s midtown location. Their suite contains five workstations supported by a 10-box renderfarm, Maxon Cinema 4D, Adobe After Effects, one seat of Flame, Assimilate Scratch access for color and an insert stage for practical shooting. It is further supported by 28TBs of Infortrend storage. 

While acknowledging tools are important, executive creative director Fred Salkind says, “Sometimes when I’m asked what we work with, I say Scotch tape and scissors, because it’s the idea that puts the tools to work, not the other way around.”

Main Photo by Eljay Aguillo. L-R: Fred Salkind, David Rogers, Doug LeBow and Karolina Dawson.

Assimilate Scratch and Scratch VR Suite upgraded to V.8.6

Assimilate is now offering an open beta for Scratch 8.6 and the Scratch VR Suite 8.6, the latest versions of its realtime post tools and workflow — VR/360 and 2D/3D content, from dailies to conform grading, compositing and finishing. Expanded HDR functions are featured throughout the product line, including in Scratch VR, which now offers stitching capabilities.

Both open beta versions gives pros the opportunity to actively use the full suite of Scratch and Scratch VR tools, while evaluating and submitting requests and recommendations for additional features or updates.

Scratch Web for cloud-based, realtime review and collaboration, and Scratch Play for immediate review and playback, are also included in the ecosystem updates. Both products support VR/360 and 2D/3D content.

Current users of the Scratch VR Suite 8.5 and Scratch Finishing 8.5 can download the Scratch 8.6 open beta. Scratch 8.6 open beta and the Scratch VR Suite open beta are available now.

“V8.6 is a major update for both Scratch and the Scratch VR Suite with significant enhancements to the HDR and ACES workflows. We’ve added stitching to the VR toolset so that creators have a complete and streamlined end-to-end VR workflow,” says Jeff Edson, CEO at Assimilate. “The open Beta helps us to continue developing the best and most useful post production features and techniques all artists need to perfect their creativity in color grading and finishing. We act on all input, much of it immediately and some in regular updates.”

Here are some details of the update:

HDR
• PQ and HLG transfer functions are now an integral part of Scratch color management.
• Scopes automatically switch to HDR mode if needed and show levels in a nit-scale; highlights any reference level that you set.
• At the project level, define the HDR mastering metadata: color space, color primaries and white levels, luminance levels and more. The metadata is automatically included in the Video HDMI interface (AJA, BMD, Bluefish444) for display.
• Static metadata has the function to calculate dynamic luminance metadata like MaxCLL and MaxFall.
• HDR footage can be published directly to YouTube with HDR metadata.

VR/360 – Scratch VR Suite
• 360 stitching functionality: load all your source media from your 360 cameras into Scratch VR and combine it to a single equirectangular image. Support for camera stitch templates: AutoPano projects, Hugin and PTStitch scripts.
• Ambisonic Audio: Scratch VR can load, set and playback ambisonic audio files to complete the 360 immersive experience.
• Video with 360 sound can be published directly to YouTube 360.
• Additional overlay handles to the existing 2D-equirectangular feature for more easily positioning 2D elements in a 360 scene.

DIT Reporting Function
• Create a report of all clips of either a timeline, a project or just a selection of shots.
• Reports include metadata, such as a thumbnail, clip-name, timecode, scene, take, comments and any metadata attached to a clip.
• Choose from predefined templates or create your own.

G-Tech 6-15

Quick Chat: Xytech COO Greg Dolan

Greg Dolan has seen tremendous change in the industry during his career. After a tenure at New York City’s Post Perfect, where he was CIO, Dolan switched to the vendor side of the business, bringing his hands-on post house expertise to a facility management company. After a number of successful years and product rollout, he moved to Xytech, where he is now COO. Xytech offers facility management software for scheduling all resources, managing all operations and tracking all assets, while providing reporting and accounting tools.

MediaPulse offers over 35 modules to manage the complicated tasks that facilities deal with daily. This past year, Xytech added interoperability, transmission and mobility, and a broadcast services division.

We recently reached out to Dolan to talk about the need and evolution of facility management tools.

What are some of the most frequently asked questions you get from customers?
Every client wants to know how their unique business workflows are managed in a commercially available product. It’s an incredibly fair point, and skepticism is warranted. Lots of companies have made lots of promises, not always with the best results. Every client has a unique mixture of workflows, integration needs and accounting treatments, however at a granular level, many requirements are seen throughout the industry. Our continued investment in MediaPulse ensures we stay current with these requirements, and the design of MediaPulse allows us to configure to exactly the client’s needs. This takes discipline and more importantly total commitment. Surprises always occur and the real test of a company and its people is in the response to these surprises.

What are some questions customers should be asking when it comes to facility management software that they often don’t?
My father was fond of saying, “They put erasers on pencils for a reason.” As vendors, we are all very happy to give “happy talk” as though our clients can’t see straight through the marketing haze. I wish more clients asked us to talk about our biggest challenges — times where we made mistakes — and then engaged us in conversation around how it was remedied. On a more concrete front, questioning a vendor about the technical architecture of their products and getting a list of previous years’ new features is essential. Success demands technical acuity from vendors and these types of questions really separate the wheat from the chaff.

Can you talk about the most important benefits of facility management tools for today’s facilities?
Facilities are challenged more than ever to get more done in narrower and narrower windows. There simply isn’t any room for inefficacies, and individual departments can’t operate as a silo. Facility management systems tie all the disparate operations, automate workflows and seamlessly exchange metadata with all systems in the facility. This eliminates redundancy and allows staff to manage by exception, with most activities automated.

What are some misconceptions about facility management tools?
These are not just scheduling systems. In fact, the idea of a standalone scheduling system having any relevance today is wildly anachronistic. Certainly, you still must schedule people and equipment to be in a place to do a thing, but this is a subset of the larger vision. To move the needle — all operations with their associated accounting and automation needs should be included in the system portfolio. Media manufacturing automation, federated asset and metadata management and transmission management are vital to the overall operational picture regardless of a facility’s size.

It’s obvious that bigger facilities could benefit from facility management tools, but can you tell the smaller studios why it’s important as well?
We think it’s more important for smaller facilities as there is a lower margin of error. For a modest investment, smaller facilities get a vital holistic view of all operations while having their billing and accounting totally automated. Facility management systems make sure all staff members are engaged in moving the business forward instead of burning unrecoverable hours fixing mistakes. Time is a key restriction for all of us. We find time where none exists.

How has this type of software evolved over the years, and how do you see it evolving again in the future?
Let me be very clear — it’s essential for clients to ensure their vendor understands the concept of the question. The game is incredibly different now and the tools of the past are woefully unprepared for today’s marketplace. To quote Lincoln, “The dogmas of the quiet past are inadequate to the stormy present.”

The simple answer is interoperability. It is a critical requirement for today’s systems. A lot of noise is made around interoperability, but it doesn’t take too long to separate point-to-point integrations from truly modern architectures. As for the future, I don’t have a crystal ball, but I do know we are committed to delivering technology capable of evolving and quickly responding to the changes. You simply must have the entire organization on a constant change footing.


Corey Stewart joins Harbor Picture Company as CTO 

New York-based full-service post house Harbor Picture Company has hired Corey Stewart as chief technology officer. He brings 20 years of industry experience to his role.

Stewart joins Harbor from Technicolor PostWorks New York, where he had served as chief engineer since 2008. During that time he designed and managed integration of a large-scale routing control system, created a KVM switching infrastructure to increase room flexibility and production, and managed engineering teams during acquisitions and management changes.

Prior to that role, Stewart held a number of jobs at the company, including online editor, Avid support technician and lead engineer. Earlier on in his career, Stewart attended the School of Visual Arts in New York where he studied film and video with an editorial concentration, taught film production classes and worked as an Adobe After Effects designer/assistant editor at Harvey’s Place. He has been credited as DI engineer on a variety of feature films and television shows. He is also a member of the HPA, SMPTE, Digital Cinema Technology and more.

“The reality of our new landscape of anywhere, anytime, any artist, has demanded that we continue to seek out new technologies and technologists to facilitate the type of unlimited access to creativity that clients are in search of,” says founder/president Zak Tucker. “Corey was the perfect candidate for this new position because he shares our vision and holistic approach to post — providing omnipresent support to clients, everywhere from on set to the point of delivery. The creative benefit of this type of seamless workflow is the collaboration fostered between picture and sound, and it’s only made possible by the types of technological advancements and workflows industry vets like Corey are implementing and innovating.”

Recent Harbor projects include work on Arrival, Beauty and the Beast and Showtime’s Billions.


Quick Chat: Freefolk US executive producer Celia Williams

By Randi Altman

A few months back, UK-based post house Finish purchased VFX studio Realise and renamed the company Freefolk. They also expanded into the US with a New York City-based studio. Industry vet Celia Williams, who was most recently head of production at agency Arnold NY, is heading up Freefolk US. To find out more about the recently rebranded entity, we reached out to Williams.

Can you describe Freefolk? What kind of services do you offer?
Freefolk is a team of creative artists, technicians and problem solvers who use post production as their tool box. We offer services including high-end FilmLight Baselight color grading, remote grading, 2D and 3D visual effects, final conform, shoot supervision, animation, data management and direction of special projects. We work across the mediums of advertising, film, TV and digital content.

L-R: Celia Williams, Paul Harrison and Jason Watts.

What spurred on Freefolk’s expansion to the US?
Having carved out a reputation in London over the last 13 years as a commercials post house, the expansion to the US seemed like a natural progression for the founders, allowing them to export a boutique service and high-quality work rather than becoming another large machine in London.

Will you be offering the same services in both locations?
The services we offer in London will all be represented in New York. Color grading plays such an important role in the process these days, so we are spearheading with a Baselight suite driven by Paul Harrison and 2D VFX department being set up by Jason Watts.

Will you share staff between New York and the UK?
Yes, there will be a sharing of resources and, obviously, experience across the offices. A great thing about opening in New York is being able to offer our staff the experience of working in a foreign city. It also gives clients who are increasingly working across multiple markets a seamless global service.

Why the rebrand from Finish to Freefolk?
The rebrand from Finish to Freefolk came about as part of the expansion into the US and the acquisition of Realise. It was also a timely opportunity to express one of the core values of the company, and the way it values its staff and clients — Freefolk is about the people involved in the process.

What does the acquisition of Realise mean to the company?
Realise has brought a wealth of experience and talent to the table. They combine creative skill and technical understanding in equal measure. They are known in both commercials and now film and TV for offering very specialized capabilities with Side Effects Houdini and customized software.

We have just completed VFX work on 400 shots over 10 episodes of NBC’s Emerald City TV series (due to be released early 2017) and have just embarked on our next long-form project. It’s really exciting to be expanding into other mediums such as TV, film, installation work, projection mapping and other experimental and experiential arenas.

You have an ad agency background. From your own experience how important is that to clients?
It’s extremely important and comforting, actually. Understanding what the producers and creatives are challenged with on a daily basis gives me the ability to offer workable solutions to their problems in a very collaborative way. They don’t have to wonder if I “get” where they’re coming from. Frankly, I do.

I think that it’s emotionally helpful as well. To know someone can be an understanding shoulder to lean on and is taking their concerns seriously is beyond important. Everyone is working at breakneck speed in our industry, which can lead to a lack of humanity in our interactions. One of the main reasons I was attracted to working with Freefolk is that they are deeply dedicated to keeping that humanity and personal touch in the way they do business.

The way that post companies service agencies has changed due to the way that products are now being marketed — online ads, social media, VR. Can you talk about that?
To be well informed and prepped as early on in the process as you can be is key. And to truly partner with the producers and creatives, as much as they need or want, is critical. What might work in one medium may be less impactful in another, so from the get-go, how do we plan to ensure all deliverables are strong, and to offer insights into new technology that might impact the outcome? It’s all about sharing and collaboration.

I may be one of the few people who’ve never really panicked about the different ways we deliver final work — our industry has always been about change, which is what keeps it interesting. At the end of the day, it’s always been about delivering content, in one form or another. So you need to know your final deliverables list and plan accordingly.


Steve Holyhead

AJA brings on Steve Holyhead from Fox Broadcasting

Steve Holyhead has joined AJA as senior product manager for desktop products. He joins AJA from Fox Broadcasting Company where he was director of technical operations.

Holyhead recently moved to Grass Valley, where AJA is headquartered, from Los Angeles. In addition to working at Fox, his 20-plus years of industry experience includes developing professional digital video workflows with BloomCast, managing post operations at Discovery Communications and working as a technology evangelist, producer and technical marketing manager for both Discreet (now Autodesk) and Avid. He has also developed Avid and Adobe training courses for multiple partners, including Lynda.com.

“Steve brings a blend of real-world production and technology developer experience to AJA. His understanding of production, broadcast and post, together with his experience both designing enterprise scale workflows and as a master trainer for Adobe, Apple and Avid products, will make powerful contributions to the success of our customers,” says Nick Rashby, president of AJA.


Veteran Kitty Snyder joins Atlanta’s Artifact as EP

Atlanta-based creative studio Artifact Design has hired post production veteran Kitty Snyder as executive producer. In this new role, Snyder will use her expertise in developing brand and marketing strategies, developing client relationships and bidding and producing projects. Her strong ties within the agency and film community will complement the full range of production, design, VFX, animation and post capabilities of the Artifact.

Most recently, Snyder was the director of creative partnerships for the Atlanta branches of Beast, Company 3 and Method Studios, all part of Deluxe Creative Services. Her previous positions include producer at ad agency Huge, where she worked on campaigns for such clients as Airheads, Lowe’s, Mohawk and Coca-Cola. She also spent nearly decade as senior business manager, creative services, at Crawford Media Services.

A former singer-songwriter, Snyder has toured the country solo and with bands. She got her start in the television and film industry producing and writing for various network shows for HGTV and GPTV. Since then, she has collaborated with clients such as Tyler Perry Studios, Cartoon Network and CNN, as well as ad agencies BBDO, JWT and Ogilvy & Mather.


Photo Credit: Hopper Stone.

The A-List: Hidden Figures director Ted Melfi

By Iain Blair

When writer/producer/director Ted Melfi (St. Vincent) first came across the true story behind his new film, Hidden Figures, he was amazed that it had never been told before. The drama recounts the history of an elite team of black female mathematicians at NASA who helped win the all-out space race against the Soviet Union and, at the same time, brought issues of race, equal rights, sexism and opportunity to the surface of 1960s society.

Focusing on a trio of women who crossed gender, race and professional lines, it stars Oscar-nominee Taraji P. Henson (Empire, Benjamin Button), Oscar-winner Octavia Spencer (Fruitvale Station, The Help), singer Janelle Monáe (making her motion picture debut) and two-time Oscar winner Kevin Costner (Field of Dreams, Dances With Wolves).

Photo Credit: Hopper Stone.

Ted Melfi

Based on the book by Margot Lee Shetterly, the film was written by Melfi and screenwriter Allison Schroeder, who reports that the subject matter was already embedded in her DNA. “I grew up a NASA baby in Florida,” she explains. “My grandparents and dad all worked there, and then I interned there for four years during high school and worked for a missile launch company after my freshman year at college.” She then channeled that family history and her own workplace experiences into a story about “what it was like to be a woman in science and mathematics back then.”

Not long ago, I spoke with Melfi about making the film and his workflow.

This is a very timely film, dealing as it does with racism, sexism and all the issues with Russia and the space race. Was that the appeal?
Absolutely. It’s a completely unknown true story for many reasons, the main one being that all the material was classified for so long because of the Cold War and our fear of Russia. So everyone on the space program was sworn to secrecy, and even the astronauts themselves didn’t know who’d be flying until days before a launch.

While we have parades celebrating astronauts, athletes and so on, we don’t have parades for mathematicians. So I wanted to make an American classic, a movie about this crossroads in America where you had the fight for civil rights and the space race. That’s how I saw it in my mind — how did all that collide?

Photo Credit: Hopper Stone.You got a great cast. How tough was it casting the women?
Taraji was my first thought for her role and she said yes right away on the phone after I just pitched her the storyline. Octavia was also on board right away. Janelle was the hard one, in that it was tough casting her role. We wanted someone fresh and different, and once she came in to audition, we knew she was perfect for it, and she just blew it away.

Did you get a lot of cooperation from NASA?
Not only did we get tons of help from them, but I’ve become good friends with some of the guys there. They pored through draft after draft, gave notes and really helped us craft all the math. So everything in the film is completely accurate from a scientific, mathematical and engineering standpoint, and they were so helpful. We also had a math scholar who helped us and Taraji with her math and all the equations, so we spent a lot of time on research.

What was the biggest production challenge?
How to pull off the space race, because we were essentially a low budget film — a $25 million movie — and we didn’t have the money or time to recreate all the launches and rocket stuff. So we had to find a very clever way of combining archival footage and VFX with all the live-action footage. You see those transitions throughout the film; we’ll have a piece of archival footage and then roll right into something we shot, with all the VFX incorporated into that.

Getting all that archival footage was both tricky and easy — easy as NASA has a huge archive, but they also have a lot of footage that they couldn’t find. So we had to send a film historian specialist to DC to dig through all of NASA’s film reel archives in this massive vault, and that was a lot of work, since they have thousands and thousands of them of every piece of footage ever shot of all the launches and landings and so on. We wanted the original negatives, and he was able to get almost all of them. Then we re-scanned them and blended them into our footage.

You shot on location in Atlanta. Was that tough?
Yes, in that we had just 43 days, which is very short for something of this scope.

Given that sexism is a main theme, and there’s so much talk now about Hollywood’s lack of diversity, was it intentional or coincidental that you hired a female DP, Mandy Walker?
It was a bit of both. I met with a bunch of DPs, and she was just great. It’s a shame that just three percent of the world’s DPs are women. So I try to approach my professional life with a very inclusive attitude, just in general, which means you have to work at it and be pro-active, and 35 percent of our crew were female, and extremely diverse.

Do you like post?
I love it, until you get to the very end. (Laughs) For me, after the shoot, when I literally feel like collapsing because I’m so tired and exhausted. Then I get to this room with a couch, and can finally sit down. So it’s like a vacation in a way, where I get to enjoy and discover stuff every day. At times it’s depressing, when there are problems, but it’s mainly a time of exuberance and joy for me. But at the end, say the last month, it becomes the same as the shoot, with all the time and money constraints, and the pressure to get it done in time.

Where did you do the post?
All on the Fox lot. We did the editing and had our whole team in the same building — our sound team, music guys — and it was awesome, like a small family. The only problem was that we got a very truncated post schedule. Based off all the dailies, the studio decided they wanted to release it early in time for all the awards season stuff, so suddenly we had to deliver it in October instead of for Christmas. That meant we got eight to 10 weeks cut out of post. That left us with just 26 weeks all in, which isn’t very long for something of this scope. Most movies this size get way longer than that. So that was tough.

Tell us about working with editor Peter Teschner, who cut St. Vincent for you. Was he on the set?
Yes, he was in Atlanta with us, cutting from day one as we shot. Basically, I let him do his thing, he puts the movie together in a rough assembly, and we began with a cut at just over two and a half hours. Then we got down to two. Normally, that first rough cut is the most depressing day of your life, but this one wasn’t. There was a lot of work to do, but it was enjoyable work.

Obviously, all the VFX were very important, right?
Very. It’s a period piece, and with all the capsule and rocket scenes there was a lot of stuff to do. We used Cgfluids and ILP for all the VFX, and probably had 400 to 500 shots, and maybe half of those were clean-up, like removing any modern stuff, such as streetlights and cars and so on. But then we had around 100 shots of capsule stuff — the capsules in orbit, pieces of the rocket going up, and then John Glenn’s re-entry and fire scenes.

Can you talk about the importance of music and sound in the film?
It’s so crucial to every scene. People say it’s half your movie, but I think it’s often more. Just watch your movie without sound or music and you go, “This is so awful! It’s the worst thing I’ve ever seen,” but then you start adding all those layers and it suddenly all comes alive. It’s all these little things that add up to huge things and how an audience feels emotionally and how they respond.

I had a great sound team — Andy Nelson was the re-recording mixer and Derek Vanderhorst was the sound designer, and those guys are brilliant. When you’re in space and in the capsule, you need to feel all that, the intensity of the rocket. Then musically we had a great team with Pharrell and Hans Zimmer and Ben Wallfisch. They came on board very early, before we even began proper production, to map out the musical plan. So we had music to shoot to. We shot Taraji’s running scenes to Pharrell’s track, which was a big benefit.

Where did you do the DI?
On the Fox lot with colorist Natasha Leonett from Efilm at their room there. She’s done a ton of films, including La La Land. She’s brilliant.

You’ve had a long and very successful career directing over 100 commercials, so I assume you’re very involved?
You’re right. I’ve been used to doing coloring for over 20 years, as my DP was never around, so Mandy came in for a few days and then I did my thing. It’s the final piece of the post workflow and I love it.


Industry insider Iain Blair has been interviewing the biggest directors in Hollywood and around the world for years. He is a regular contributor to Variety and has written for such outlets as Reuters, The Chicago Tribune, The Los Angeles Times and the Boston Globe.


China’s Wanda Studios expands in a big way

China’s The Wanda Group is adding a $8.2 billion dollar “movie metropolis” to the company’s existing entertainment hub. Wanda Studios Qingdoa spans over 400 acres in a northern region between Beijing and Shanghai.

The complex will offer a variety of facilities for film and television production, with a floor area of 58 million square feet, 30 soundstages — including one of the largest soundstages in the world at 107,600 square feet — 24 production workshops, tenant office space, backlots with permanently constructed sets and two large water tanks. The studio supports every facet of production for a rapidly growing base of global creative clients.

In order to keep things running smoothly across all departments, Wanda Studios is calling on Xytech’s MediaPulse to manage all operations from budget to execution through financial reconciliation for the soundstages, production workshops, office spaces and other services offered by the studio. The solution also includes the implementation of a MediaPulse Rental to manage the business and track equipment with integration to a RFID tagging system. The initial installation of MediaPulse is now live and full deployment is anticipated by the completion of the studio in the coming months.

Digging Deeper: Fraunhofer’s Dr. Siegfried Foessel

By Randi Altman

If you’ve been to NAB, IBC, AES or regional conferences involving media and entertainment technology, you have likely seen Fraunhofer exhibiting or heard one of their representatives speaking on a panel.

Fraunhofer first showed up on my radar years ago at an AES show in New York City when they were touting the new MP3 format, which they created. From that moment on, I’ve made it a point to keep up on what Fraunhofer has been doing in other areas of the industry, but for some, what Fraunhofer is and does is a mystery.

We decided to help with that mystery by throwing some questions at Dr. Siegfried Foessel, Fraunhofer IIS Department Moving Picture Technologies.

Can you describe Fraunhofer?
Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft is an organization for applied research that has 67 institutes and research units at locations throughout Germany. At present, there are around 24,000 people. The majority are qualified scientists and engineers who work with an annual research budget of more than 2.1 billion euros.

More than 70 percent of the Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft’s research revenue is derived from contracts with industry and from publicly financed research projects. Almost 30 percent is contributed by the German federal and Länder governments in the form of base funding. This enables the institutes to work ahead on solutions to problems that will become relevant to industry and society within the next five or ten years from now.

How did it all begin? Is it a think tank of sorts? Tell us about Fraunhofer’s business model.
The Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft was founded in 1949 and is a recognized non-profit organization that takes its name from Joseph von Fraunhofer (1787–1826), the illustrious Munich researcher, inventor and entrepreneur. Its focus was clearly defined to do application-oriented research and to develop future-relevant key technologies. Through their research and development work, the Fraunhofer Institutes help to reinforce the competitive strength of the economy. They do so by promoting innovation, strengthening the technological base, improving the acceptance of new technologies and helping to train the urgently needed future generation of scientists and engineers.

What is Fraunhofer IIS?
The Fraunhofer Institute for Integrated Circuits IIS is an application-oriented research institution for microelectronic and IT system solutions and services. With the creation of MP3 and the co-development of AAC, Fraunhofer IIS has reached worldwide recognition. In close cooperation with partners and clients, the ISS institute provides research and development services in the following areas: audio and multimedia, imaging systems, energy management, IC design and design automation, communication systems, positioning, medical technology, sensor systems, safety and security technology, supply chain management and non-destructive testing. About 880 employees conduct contract research for industry, the service sector and public authorities.

Fraunhofer IIS partners with companies as well as public institutions?
We develop, implement and optimize processes, products and equipment until they are ready for use in the market. Flexible interlinking of expertise and capacities enables us to meet extremely broad project requirements and complex system solutions. We do contracted research for companies of all sizes. We license our technologies and developments. We work together with partners in publicly funded research projects or carry out commercial and technical feasibility studies.

IMF transcoding.

What is the focus of Fraunhofer IIS’ Department of Moving Picture Technologies?
For more than 15 years, our Department Moving Picture Technologies has driven developments for digital cinema and broadcast solutions focused on imaging systems, post production tools, formats and workflow solutions. The Department Moving Picture Technologies was chosen by the Digital Cinema Initiatives (DCI) to develop and implement the first certification test plan for digital cinema as the main reference for all systems in this area. As a leader in the ISO standardization committee for digital cinema within JPEG, my team and I are driving standardization for JPEG 2000 and formats, such as DCP and the Interoperable Master Format (IMF.)

We also are working together with SMPTE and other standardization bodies worldwide. Renowned developments for the department that are highly respected are the Arri D20/D21 camera, the easyDCP post production suite for DCP and IMF creation and playback, as well as the latest developments and results of multi-camera/light-field technology.

What are some of the things you are working on and how does that work find its way to post houses and post pros?
The engineers and scientists of the Department Moving Picture Technologies are working on tools and workflow solutions for new media file formats like IMF to enable smooth integration and use in existing workflows and to optimize performance and quality. As an example, we always enhance and augment the features available through the post production easyDCP suite. The team discusses and collaborates with customers, industry partners and professionals in the post production and digital cinema industries to identify the “most wanted and needed” requirements.

easyDCP

We preview new technologies and present developments that meet these requirements or facilitate process steps. Examples of this include the acceleration process of IMF or DCP creation by using an approach based on a hybrid JPEG 2000 functionality or introducing a media asset management tool for DCP/IMF or dailies. We present our ideas, developments and results at exhibitions such as NAB, the HPA Tech Retreat and IBC, as well as SMPTE conferences and plugfests all around the world.

Together with distribution partners who are selling the products like easyDCP, Fraunhofer IIS licenses those developments and puts them into the market. Therefore, the team always looks for customer feedback for their developments that is supported by a very active community.

Who are some of your current customers and partners?
We have more than 1,500 post houses as customers, managed by our licensing partner easyDCP GmbH. Nearly all of the Hollywood studios and post houses on all continents are our customers. We also work together with integration partners like Blackmagic and Quantel. Most of the names of our partners in the contract research area are confidential, but to name some partners from the past and present: Arri, DCI, IHSE GmbH.

Which technologies are available for license now?
• Tools for creation and playback of DCPs and IMPs, as standalone tools and for integration into third party tools
• Tools for quality control of DCPs and IMPs
• Tools for media asset management of DCPs and IMPs
• Plug-ins for light-field-processing and depth map generation
• Codecs for mezzanine compression of images

Lightfield tech

What are you working on now that people should know about?
We are developing new tools and plug-ins for bringing lightfield technology to the movie industry to enhance creativity opportunities. This includes system aspects in combination with existing post tools. We are chairing and actively participating on adhoc groups for lightfield-related standardization efforts in the JPEG/MPEG Joint Adhoc Group for digital representations of light/sound fields for immersive media applications (see https://jpeg.org/items/20160603_pleno_report.html).

We are also working together with DIN on a proposal to standardize digital long-term archive formats for movies. Basic work is done with German archives and service providers at DIN NVBF3 and together with CST from France at SMPTE with IMF App#4. Furthermore, we are developing mezzanine image compression formats for the transmission of video over IP in professional broadcast environments and GPU accelerated tools for creation and playback of JPEG 2000 code streams.

How do you pick what you will work on?
The employees at Fraunhofer IIS are very creative people. By observation of the market, research in joint projects and cooperation with universities, ideas are created and evaluated. Employees and our student scientists are discussing with industry partners what might be possible in the near future and which ideas have the greatest potential. Selected ideas will then be evaluated with respect to the business opportunities and transformed into internal projects or proposed as research projects. Our employees are tasked with working much like our eponym Joseph von Fraunhofer, as researchers, inventors and entrepreneurs — all at the same time.

What other “hats” do you wear in the industry?
As mentioned earlier, Fraunhofer is involved in standardization bodies and industry associations. For example, I chair the Systems Group within ISO SC29WG1 (JPEG) and the post production group within ISO TC36 (Cinematography). I am also a SMPTE governor (EMEA and Central and South America region) and a SMPTE fellow, along with supporting SMPTE conferences as a program committee member.

Currently, I am president of the German Society Fernseh- und Kinotechnische Gesellschaft (FKTG) and am involved in associations like EDCF and ISDCF. Additionally, I’m a speaker for the German VDE/ITG society in the area of media technology. Last, but not least, I chair the German standardization body at DIN for NVBF3 and consult the German federal film board in questions related to new technical challenges in the film industry.