Category Archives: New Hire

David Walton Smith joins digital agency Grow as head of film

Norfolk, Virginia-based digital agency Grow has expanded its film and production capabilities with the addition of David Walton Smith, who will take on the newly created role of head of film. Walton Smith will be charged with overseeing all content development and video production for the agency’s clients, which include Google, Spotify, Adidas and Adult Swim.

A multidisciplinary filmmaker and creative, Walton Smith has produced commercials, as well as branded and documentary content, for brands like Google, Volvo, Mass Mutual, Hyundai and Aleve. Prior to joining Grow, he was a director and producer at CNN’s branded content division, Courageous Studio, where he created broadcast and web content for CNN’s global audiences. He was also editor of Born to Explore with Richard Wiese, an Emmy Award winning show that aired on ABC, as well as creative lead/director at London and Brooklyn-based LonelyLeap, where he spearheaded campaigns for Google and Tylenol.

Grow works with brands including Google, Spotify, NBC, Adidas, Homes.com, Oxygen Network and Adult Swim, to create digital experiences, products and interactive installations. Notable recent projects include Window Wonderland for Google Shopping, Madden Giferator for EA Sports, as part of Google’s Art, Copy & Code initiative, as well as The Pursuit, an interactive, crime thriller game created with Oxygen Media.

ASC names Eric Rodli executive director

Eric Rodli has been named executive director of the American Society of Cinematographers (ASC). Rodli, an ASC associate member since 2001, has served six years as co-chair of the ASC Motion Imaging Technology Council’s Cinema Display Committee. He co-authored the committee’s 2016 white paper “Cinema Display Evaluation Plan and Test Protocol,” which explores the key image quality parameters of dynamic range, color space and overall luminance, as well as suggesting testing parameters.

He has also been a member of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences Task Force on Content Preservation, and has participated in numerous industry panels ranging on topics from digital media distribution to projection.

Rodli served as president at Iwerks Entertainment, Bexel and Kodak’s motion picture film division, and most recently as CFO of BeBop Technologies. He has worked on many creative and technical initiatives across multiple industry sectors, dating back to pioneering the use of the first generation of HD cameras, as well as 3D projection, digital streaming technology and laser projection systems. His strategic and hands-on experience in the imaging chain has fueled his belief that technology should serve the artist.

Focused on education, the ASC hosts many programs, including the ASC Master Classes, Student Heritage Awards, Coffee and Conversation Q&As with cinematographers and panel discussions by the Education and Outreach Committee. The efforts of the ASC Motion Imaging Technology Council (MITC) since 2003 have shaped the standards and practices of cinematography for digital workflows, with the group and its committees working closely with the Academy’s Sci-Tech Council and SMPTE. The ASC Vision Committee also holds events to foster diversity and equality on camera crews.

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Neil Anderson upped to colorist at Lucky Post, talks inspiration

Neil Anderson has been promoted to colorist at Dallas’ Lucky Post after joining the company in 2013 right out of film school. Anderson’s projects include national brands such as Canada Dry, Costa, TGI Friday’s, The Salvation Army and YETI. His latest feature work was featured at the 2018 Sundance Film Festival in Augustine Frizzell’s comedy, Never Goin’ Back. He works on Blackmagic Resolve 14.

Anderson’s interest in cameras and color science inspired his career as a colorist, but he says his inspiration changes all the time, depending on where his mind is at. “Sometimes I’ll see a commercial on TV and think, ‘Wow. There was great care put into that piece, I wonder how they did that?’ Then I’ll go back and rewatch it over and over again trying to pick it apart and see what I can glean. Or if I’m developing a specific workflow/look and I’m struggling to get exactly what I’m after, I’ll find interesting frames from films that pop into my head for guidance.”

In terms of colorists who inspire him, Anderson points to Peter Doyle (who most recently colored Darkest Hour). “He’s incredibly technical, and he exploits his thorough knowledge of color science to guide films through a color pipeline in an almost algorithmic fashion. I’m at awe by his expertise and, in a way, use him as a model of how I want to approach projects.

“I also admire Steven Scott for maybe the opposite reason. While technical like Peter, to me he approaches projects with a painter’s eye first. I’ve heard him say the best inspiration is to simply pay attention to the world around us. His work and approach remind me to branch out artistically just as much as I try technically.”

When he thinks about cinematographers, Roger Deakins comes to mind. “He’s a DP that really captures almost the entire look of the film in-camera, and the color grading is supposedly very simple and minor in the end. This is because he and his colorist work hand in hand before the shoot, developing a look they’ll see and use on set,” explains Anderson. “This workflow is a critical tool for modern colorists, and Roger is a reminder of the importance of having a good relationship with your DP.”

Tim Nagle, a Lucky Post finishing artist, describes Anderson as a “quiet and ardent observer of life’s design, from light and shadow on a city street to bold color blocks in a Wong Kar-wai film. His attention to detail and process are implacable.”

“Color is like magic to most people; the process feels like happenstance and you don’t realize how it’s supporting the narrative until it’s not,” concludes Anderson. “I love the challenge of each project and mining through color theory to achieve the best results for our clients.”


Quick Chat: ArsenalCreative’s new VFX supervisor Mike Wynd

VFX supervisor Mike Wynd has joined ArsenalCreative from MPC, where he spent eight years in a similar role. Over the years, Wynd has worked on many high-profile projects for directors such as Rupert Sanders, Noam Murro and Adam Berg. He has also won a number of industry awards, including a Silver Clio and a Gold British Arrow, as well as a VES Award nomination.

Wynd started his career in Melbourne, Australia, working for Computer Pictures before landing at Images Post in Auckland, New Zealand. Eight years later, he headed back to Australia to serve as head of 3D at Garner MacLennan Design, where he worked on many high-end animations and effects, including the first Lord of the Rings movie. After that studio was bought out, Wynd joined Digital Pictures. Next, he assisted in establishing a new 3D/design team at FSM. After that he relocated to Los Angeles, where he worked for Moving Pixels. Later, he took on the role of VFX supervisor for MPC.

We reached out to Wynd to ask him a few questions about being a VFX supervisor:

What drew you to VFX supervision?
The thing I enjoy most about VFX supervision is the problem solving. From how best to shoot what we require to seamlessly integrating our effects, through to the actual approach and tools that we’ll employ in post production. We’ve always got a finite amount of time and money with which to produce our work and a little bit of alternative thinking can go a long way to achieve higher quality and more efficient results.

How early do you like being brought onto a project?
I’d prefer to be bought in on a project ideally from day one. Especially on a complex VFX project, being involved alongside production means that we, as a team, can troubleshoot many aspects of the job, that in the long run, will mean savings in cost and time as well as higher quality results. It also gives time for relationships to be formed between VFX and production so that on the shoot the VFX team is seen as an asset rather than a hindrance.

Do you go on set? Why is that so important?
I do go on set… a lot! I have been very lucky over the years to travel to some incredible locations all over the world. It’s so important because this is where the foundations are laid for a successful job. Being able to see how and why footage is shot the way it is goes a long way toward finding solutions to post issues.

Actually seeing the environment of a scene can offer clues that may help in significantly reducing any issues that may arise once the footage is back in the studio. And, of course, there’s the nuts and bolts of capturing set information, along with color and lighting references critical to the project. And probably the most important reason to be on-set is to act as the conduit connecting production and post. The two parties often act so separately from one another, yet each is only doing half the job.

Have you worked on anything at ArsenalCreative yet?
It’s early days for me at ArsenalCreative, but thus far I’ve worked on a Chevy presentation for the motor shows and a series of pod shots for Lexus.

If you had one piece of advice for someone about to embark on a project that involves VFX, what would it be?
Ha! Get VFX involved from day one!


Sim Post LA beefs up with Greg Ciaccio and Paul Chapman

It’s always nice when good things happen to good people. Recently, long-time industry post pros Greg Ciaccio and Paul Chapman joined Sim Post LA — Greg as VP of post and Paul as VP of engineering and technology.

postPerspective has known both Greg and Paul for years and often call on them to pick their brains about technology, so having them end up working together warms our hearts.

Sim Post is a division of Sim, which provides end-to-end solutions for TV and feature film production and post production in LA, Vancouver, Toronto, New York and Atlanta.

“I’ll be working with the operations, sales, technology and finance teams to ensure tight integration between departments — always in the service of our clients,” reports Ciaccio. “Our ability to offer end-to-end services is a great advantage in the industry. I’ve admired the work produced by the talented group at Sim Post LA (formerly Chainsaw and Bling), and now I’m pleased to be a part of the team.”

Ciaccio’s resume includes executive operations management positions for creative service divisions at Ascent, Technicolor and Deluxe, and has led product development teams creating products. He also serves as chair of the ASC Motion Imaging Technology Council’s Workflow Committee, currently focused on ACES education and enlightenment, and is a member of the UHD/HDR Committee and Joint ASC/ICG/VES/PGA VR Committee.

Chapman, a Fellow of SMPTE, has held executive technology and engineering positions over the last 30 years, including his long-time role at FotoKem, as well as stints at Unitel Video and others. His skillset includes expertise in storage and networking infrastructure, facility engineering and operations.

“Sim has a lot of potential, and when the opportunity was presented to lead their engineering and technology departments, it really intrigued me,” says Chapman. “The LA facility itself is well constructed from the ground up. I’m looking forward to working with the creative and technical teams across the organization to enhance our technical operations, foster innovation and elevate performance for our clients.”

Greg and Paul are based at Sim’s operations in Hollywood.

Main Caption: (L-R) Greg Ciaccio and Paul Chapman


Editor Chrissy Rabe joins BlueRock

New York-based creative editorial company BlueRock has added Chrissy Rabe as editor. Prior to joining BlueRock, she worked for Box Motion and Gloss VFX, collaborating with clients such as Nike, Prada, Calvin Klein, Louis Vuitton, Godiva, Harley Davidson, Zara, Gap, Sephora and MAC Cosmetics. Rabe also cut the Lane Bryant This Body campaign for Laird and Partners.

A Texas native, Rabe started in the business as a model at age 14. From there she went on to become a producer and photography manager before finding her way to editing. She says that modeling taught her “to not take things too personally” and how to work with a variety of personalities. As a producer and photography manager, Rabe learned to be extremely organized. “I would scour through thousands of photos to make selects to send onto the client,” she says, “which was ideal training for my future as an editor.”

“Chrissy’s unique style is reflected in the way she creates, allowing the viewer to feel pure emotional reactions while watching her pieces,” says BlueRock executive producer/managing director Courtney Ryan Law. “She is able to seamlessly blend genres, knowing just how to achieve the perfect shot at the perfect moment. That’s the beauty of her editing, and what makes her such a valuable addition to our roster.”


Cutters Chicago ups Billy Montross to editor

Billy Montross has been promoted to editor at Cutters Studio in Chicago. He joined the post house back in 2012 as an intern after working as a P.A. for director John Komnenich. By early 2013, Montross earned the role of assistant editor, supporting many of the Cutter Studio editors and key clients, but primarily working with managing editor Grant Güstafson. He edits on Avid Media Composer.

Montross has worked with agencies such as DDB, Leo Burnett, Mcgarrybowen, Ogilvy and We Are Unlimited, among many others. His reel features work for Capital One, Esurance, Fairfield Inn and Suites, McDonald’s, Oscar Mayer, Scotts, Spalding and Western Union.

Montross edited Scott’s :30 “Bill’s Yard” from DDB Chicago. It was directed by Christian Bevilacqua. The DP was Tim Hudson. Color was via Luke Morrison at The Mill.

“Billy is a rare talent,” says Güstafson. “He is an incredibly creative and instinctive editor with a very engaging and positive personality. This combination allows him to provide his clientele with beautifully nuanced edits while making the long hours working in the room extremely enjoyable and relaxed.”

In 2015 and 2016, Montross had the opportunity to work at Cutters Tokyo. There, he helped cut projects for Jeep, McDonald’s, Nissan and Suburu, all of which he says, “definitely made me into a more rounded editor.” He also acknowledges managing director/partner Craig Duncan. “He has always been tough in pushing me to work harder and grow.”

Montross continues to be busy with work at Cutters. “I’m already having a lot of opportunities that are building on the groundwork done over the past several years. Right now I’m finishing up a fun 30-second spot for Western Union with Mcgarrybowen Chicago. And then coming right up I start a Modelo project with Ogilvy and that’s being directed by Matt Bieler of Reset.”


Panavision Hollywood names Dan Hammond VP/GM

Panavision has named Dan Hammond, a longtime industry creative solutions technologist, as vice president and general manager of Panavision Hollywood. He will be responsible for overseeing daily operations at the facility and working with the Hollywood team on camera systems, optics, service and support.

Hammond is a Panavision veteran, who worked at the company between 1989 and 2008 in various departments, including training, technical marketing and sales. Most recently he was at Production Resource Group (PRG), expanding his technical services skills. He is active with industry organizations, and is an associate member of the American Society of Cinematographers (ASC), as well as a member of the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences (ATAS) and Association of Independent Commercial Producers (AICP).


Director and former agency EP Katya Bankowsky joins Strike Anywhere

Director Katya Bankowsky has been added to the roster at LA- and San Francisco-based production company Strike Anywhere. Bankowsky is a former agency executive producer and director. Working as an EP led to her directing campaigns in-house for ad agencies like Mcgarrybowen. Her signing is a strategic move for Strike Anywhere, as it continues to work in traditional and non-traditional media with a formal directorial roster.

Katya Bankowsky is a California native who became a New Yorker upon graduating from Yale. After college, she took a production job in advertising, where she learned the art of the 30-second movie. Bankowsky soon went freelance and began shooting her feature documentary Shadow Boxers, which follows the emergence of women in boxing and the rise of the first undefeated world champion Lucia Rijker. Bankowsky directed, edited and produced the film and also boxed in the first NYC Golden Gloves to allow female competitors. Shadow Boxers premiered at the Toronto and Berlin International Film Festivals, picking up awards across the festival circuit before obtaining worldwide distribution.

Bankowsky’s non-documentary work includes TV spots, branded entertainment and digital campaigns for clients including Reebok, NFL, WNBA, Verizon, the US Olympic Committee, Chase and Brazilian Brahma beer. She has worked with Maya Angelou, 50 Cent, Jay-Z and many top-tier athletes. Bankowsky recently directed a piece for The New York Times on French fashion icon Michele Lamy, which kicked off a web series she writes, directs and co-stars in alongside Lamy.

Bankowsky’s directorial style was evident in a campaign she directed for the NFL this past summer, a series called The Handoff, which is the league’s largest social media campaign to date.

A New Yorker through and through, Bankowsky will remain there, but travels back to LA often.

Charlieuniformtango Austin ups Keith Munley to EP

Keith Munley has been promoted to executive producer of charlieuniformtango, Austin. Munley joined charlieuniformtango in Austin in 2008 as an assistant editor. He is a native of the Austin area and graduated from The University of North Texas with a degree in radio, television and film in 2003. After graduation he worked as an assistant/junior editor at 501 Post for four years prior to joining ‘tango.

Munley has produced work for advertising agencies such as GSD&M, Sanders\Wingo, and LatinWorks on campaigns for Walgreen’s, Texas Lottery, AT&T and the US Air Force. Most recently, he oversaw the creation of a video for Visit Austin promoting Austin as a premier business and leisure destination. Charlieuniformtango shot, edited and created all design and visual effects work for the video, which premiered at a luncheon held this fall attended by Austin’s Mayor, Steve Adler.

“Marketing creatives are fundamentally storytellers, and an editor is the last opportunity to tell the strongest story possible,” says Munley, who works on Avid Media Composer, Autodesk Flame and Avid Pro Tools. “I enjoy that process of teamwork a lot.”