Category Archives: HFR

SMPTE: The convergence of toolsets for television and cinema

By Mel Lambert

While the annual SMPTE Technical Conferences normally put a strong focus on things visual, there is no denying that these gatherings offer a number of interesting sessions for sound pros from the production and post communities. According to Aimée Ricca, who oversees marketing and communications for SMPTE, pre-registration included “nearly 2,500 registered attendees hailing from all over the world.” This year’s conference, held at the Loews Hollywood Hotel and Ray Dolby Ballroom from October 24-27, also attracted more than 108 exhibitors in two exhibit halls.

Setting the stage for the 2016 celebration of SMPTE’s Centenary, opening keynotes addressed the dramatic changes that have occurred within the motion picture and TV industries during the past 100 years, particularly with the advent of multichannel immersive sound. The two co-speakers — SMPTE president Robert Seidel and filmmaker/innovator Doug Trumbull — chronicled the advance in audio playback sound since, respectively, the advent of TV broadcasting after WWII and the introduction of film soundtracks in 1927 with The Jazz Singer.

Robert Seidel

ATSC 3.0
Currently VP of CBS Engineering and Advanced Technology, with responsibility for TV technologies at CBS and the CW networks, Seidel headed up the team that assisted WRAL-HD, the CBS affiliate in Raleigh, North Carolina, to become the first TV station to transmit HDTV in July 1996.  The transition included adding the ability to carry 5.1-channel sound using Advanced Television Systems Committee (ATSC) standards and Dolby AC-3 encoding.

The 45th Grammy Awards Ceremony broadcast by CBS Television in February 2004 marked the first scheduled HD broadcast with a 5.1 soundtrack. The emergent ATSC 3.0 standard reportedly will provide increased bandwidth efficiency and compression performance. The drawback is the lack of backwards compatibility with current technologies, resulting in a need for new set-top boxes and TV receivers.

As Seidel explained, the upside for ATSC 3.0 will be immersive soundtracks, using either Dolby AC-4 or MPEG-H coding, together with audio objects that can carry alternate dialog and commentary tracks, plus other consumer features to be refined with companion 4K UHD, high dynamic range and high frame rate images. In June, WRAL-HD launched an experimental ATSC 3.0 channel carrying the station’s programming in 1080p with 4K segments, while in mid-summer South Korea adopted ATSC 3.0 and plans to begin broadcasts with immersive audio and object-based capabilities next February in anticipation of hosting the 2018 Winter Olympics. The 2016 World Series games between the Cleveland Indians and the Chicago Cubs marked the first live ATSC 3.0 broadcast of a major sporting event on experimental station Channel 31, with an immersive-audio simulcast on the Tribune Media-owned Fox affiliate WJW-TV.

Immersive audio will enable enhanced spatial resolution for 3D sound-source localization and therefore provide an increased sense of envelopment throughout the home listening environment, while audio “personalization” will include level control for dialog elements, alternate audio tracks, assistive services, other-language dialog and special commentaries. ATSC 3.0 also will support loudness normalization and contouring of dynamic range.

Doug Trumbull

Higher Frame Rates
With a wide range of experience within the filmmaking and entertainment technologies, including visual effects supervision on 2001: A Space Odyssey, Close Encounters of the Third Kind, Star Trek: The Motion Picture and Blade Runner, Trumbull also directed Silent Running and Brainstorm, as well as special venue offerings. He won an Academy Award for his Showscan process for high-speed 70mm cinematography, helped develop IMAX technologies and now runs Trumbull Studios, which is innovating a new MAGI process to offer 4K 3D at 120fps. High production costs and a lack of playback environments meant that Trumbull’s Showscan format never really got off the ground, which was “a crushing disappointment,” he conceded to the SMPTE audience.

But meanwhile, responding to falling box office receipts during the ‘50s and ‘60s, Hollywood added more consumer features, including large-screen presentations and surround sound, although the movie industry also began to rely on income from the TV community for broadcast rights to popular cinema releases.

As Seidel added, “The convergence of toolsets for both television and cinema — including 2K, 4K and eventually 8K — will lead to reduced costs, and help create a global market around the world [with] a significant income stream.” He also said that “cord cutting” — substituting cable subscription services for Amazon.com, Hulu, iTunes, Netflix and the like — is bringing people back to over-the-air broadcasting.

Trumbull countered that TV will continue at 60fps “with a live texture that we like,” whereas film will retain its 24fps frame rate “that we have loved for years and which has a ‘movie texture.’ Higher frame rates for cinema, such as 48fps used by Peter Jackson for several of the Lord of the Rings films, has too much of a TV look. Showscan at 120fps and a 360-degree shutter avoided that TV look, which is considered objectionable.” (Early reviews of director Ang Lee’s upcoming 3D film Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk, which was shot in 4K at 120fps, have been critical of its video look and feel.)

complex-tv-networkNext-Gen Audio for Film and TV
During a series of “Advances in Audio Reproduction” conference sessions, chaired by Chris Witham, director of digital cinema technology at Walt Disney Studios, three presentations covered key design criteria for next-generation audio for TV and film. During his discussion called “Building the World’s Most Complex TV Network — A Test Bed for Broadcasting Immersive & Interactive Audio,” Robert Bleidt, GM of Fraunhofer USA’s audio and multimedia division, provided an overview of a complete end-to-end broadcast plant that was built to test various operational features developed by Fraunhofer, Technicolor and Qualcomm. These tests were used to evaluate an immersive/object-based audio system based on MPEG-H for use in Korea during planned ATSC 3.0 broadcasting.

“At the NAB Convention we demonstrated The MPEG Network,” Bleidt stated. “It is perhaps the most complex combination of broadcast audio content ever made in a single plant, involving 13 different formats.” This includes mono, stereo, 5.1-channel and other sources. “The network was designed to handle immersive audio in both channel- and HOA-based formats, using audio objects for interactivity. Live mixes from a simulated sports remote was connected to a network operating center, with distribution to affiliates, and then sent to a consumer living room, all using the MPEG-H audio system.”

Bleidt presented an overview of system and equipment design, together with details of a critical AMAU (audio monitoring and authoring unit) that will be used to mix immersive audio signals using existing broadcast consoles limited to 5.1-channel assignment and panning.

Dr. Jan Skoglund, who leads a team at Google developing audio signal processing solutions, addressed the subject of “Open-source Spatial Audio Compression for VR Content,” including the importance of providing realistic immersive audio experiences to accompany VR presentations and 360-degree 3D video.

“Ambisonics have reemerged as an important technique in providing immersive audio experiences,” Skoglund stated. “As an alternative to channel-based 3D sound, Ambisonics represent full-sphere sound, independent of loudspeaker location.” His fascinating presentation considered the ways in which open-source compression technologies can transport audio for various species of next-generation immersive media. Skoglund compared the efficacy of several open-source codecs for first-order Ambisonics, and also the progress being made toward higher-order Ambisonics (HOA) for VR content delivered via the internet, including enhanced experience provided by HOA.

Finally, Paul Peace, who oversees loudspeaker development for cinema, retail and commercial applications at JBL Professional — and designed the Model 9350, 9300 and 9310 surround units — discussed “Loudspeaker Requirements in Object-Based Cinema,” including a valuable in-depth analysis of the acoustic delivery requirements in a typical movie theater that accommodates object-based formats.

Peace is proposing the use of a new metric for surround loudspeaker placement and selection when the layout relies on venue-specific immersive rendering engines for Dolby Atmos and Barco Auro-3D soundtracks, with object-based overhead and side-wall channels. “The metric is based on three foundational elements as mapped in a theater: frequency response, directionality and timing,” he explained. “Current set-up techniques are quite poor for a majority of seats in actual theaters.”

Peace also discussed new loudspeaker requirements and layout criteria necessary to ensure a more consistent sound coverage throughout such venues that can replay more accurately the material being re-recorded on typical dub stages, which are often smaller and of different width/length/height dimensions than most multiplex environments.


Mel Lambert, who also gets photo credit on pictures from the show, is principal of Content Creators, an LA-based copywriting and editorial service, and can be reached at mel.lambert@content-creators.com Follow him on Twitter @MelLambertLA.

 

Bluefish444 offering new range of I/O cards with Kronos

Bluefish444, makers of uncompressed 4K/2K/HD/SD video I/O cards for Windows, Mac OS X and Linux, has introduced the Kronos range of video and audio I/O cards. The new line extends the feature set of Bluefish444’s Epoch video cards, which support up to 4K 60 frame per second workflows. Kronos is developed for additional workflows requiring Ultra HD up to 8K, high frame rates up to 120fps, high dynamic range and video over IP.

With these capabilities, Bluefish444 cards are developed to support all areas of TV and feature film production, post, display and restoration, in addition to virtual reality and augmented reality.

Kronos adds video processing technologies including resolution scaling, video interlace and de-interlace; hardware CODEC support, SDI to IP and IP to SDI conversion, and continues to offer the 12-bit color space conversion and low-latency capabilities of Epoch.

“With the choice of HD BNC SD/HD/3G connectivity, or SFP+ connectivity enabling greater than 3G SDI and Video over IP across 10Gbps Ethernet, the Kronos range will suit today’s demanding requirements and cover emerging technologies as they mature,” says product manager Tom Lithgow. “4K ultra high definition, high frame rate and ultra-high frame rate video, high dynamic range, video over IP and hardware assisted processing are now available to OEM developers, professional content creators and system integrators with the Bluefish444 Kronos range.”

HDMI 2.0 I/O, additional SMPTE 2022 IP standards and emerging IP standards are earmarked for future support via firmware update.

Kronos will offer the choice of SDI I/O connectivity with the Kronos elektron featuring eight high-density BNC connectors capable of SD/HD/3G SDI. Each HD BNC connector is fully bi-directional enabling numerous configuration options, including eight input, eight output, or a mixture of SDI input and output connections.

The Kronos optikós offers future proofing connectivity with three SFP+ cages in addition to two HD BNC connectors for SD/HD/3G SDI I/O. The SFP+ cages on Kronos optikós provide limitless connectivity options, exposing greater than 3G SDI, IP connectivity across 10Gb Ethernet, and flexibility to choose from numerous physical interfaces.

All Kronos cards will have an eight-lane Gen 3 PCIe interface and will provide access to high bandwidth UHD, high frame rate and high dynamic range video IO and processing across traditional SDI and also emerging IP standards such as SMPTE 2022.

Kronos specs include:
* SD SMPTE295M
* HD 1.5G SMPTE292M
* 3G (A+B) SMPTE424M
* ASI
* 4:2:2:4 / 4:4:4:4 SDI
* Single Link / Dual Link / Quad Link interfaces
* 12/10-bit SDI
* Full 4K frame buffer
* 3Gbps Bypass Relays
* 12-bit video processing pipeline
* 4 x 4 x 32bit Matrix
* MR2 Routing resources
* Hardware Keyer (2K/HD)
* Customizable and flexible pixel formats
* AES Audio Input / AES Audio Output
* LTC I / O
* RS422
* Bi/Tri-level Genlock Input & Crosslocking
* Genlock loop through
* VANC complete access
* HANC Embedded Audio/Payload ID/Custom Packets/RP188
* MSA and Non-MSA compatible SFP+
* SMPTE 2022-6

The Kronos range will be available in Q4 2016 with pricing announced then.

G-Tech 6-15

New England SMPTE holding free session on UHD/HDR/HFR, more

The New England Section of SMPTE is holding a free day-long “New Technologies Boot Camp” that focuses on working with high resolution (UHD, 4K and beyond), high-dynamic-range (HDR) imaging and higher frame rates (HFR). In addition, they will discuss how to maintain resolution independence on screens of every size, as well as how to leverage IP and ATSC 3.0 for more efficient movement of this media content.

The boot camp will run from 9am to 9pm on May 19 at the Holiday Inn in Dedham, Massachusetts.

“These are exciting times for those of us working on the technical side of broadcasting, and the array of new formats and standards we’re facing can be a bit overwhelming,” says Martin P. Feldman, chair of SMPTE New England Section. “No one wants — or can afford — to be left behind. That’s why we’re gathering some of the industry’s foremost experts for a free boot camp designed to bring engineers up to speed on new technologies that enable more efficient creation and delivery of a better broadcast product.”

Boot camp presentations will include:

• “High-Dynamic-Range and Wide Color Gamut in Production and Distribution” by Hugo Gaggioni, chief technical officer at Sony Electronics.
• “4K/UHD/HFR/HDR — HEVC H.265 — ATSC 3.0” by Karl Kuhn of Tektronix.
• “Where Is 4K (UHD) Product Used Today — 4K Versus HFR — 4K and HFR Challenges” by Bruce Lane of Grass Valley.
• “Using MESH Networks” by Al Kornak of JVC Kenwood Corporation.
• “IP in Infrastructure-Building (Replacing HD-SDI Systems and Accommodating UHD)” by Paul Briscoe of Evertz Microsystems;
• “Scripted Versus Live Production Requirements” by Michael Bergeron of Panasonic.
• “The Transition from SDI to IP, Including IP Infrastructure and Monitoring” by John Shike of SAM (formerly Snell/Quantel).
• “8K, High-Dynamic-Range, OLED, Flexible Displays” by consultant Peter Putman.
• “HDR: The Great, the Okay, and the WTF” by Mark Schubin, engineer-in-charge at the Metropolitan Opera, Sesame Street and Great Performances (PBS).

The program will conclude with a panel discussion by the program’s presenters.

 No RSVP is required, and both SMPTE members and non-members are welcome.


NAB 2016 from an EP’s perspective

By Tara Holmes

Almost two weeks ago, I found myself at NAB for the first time. I am the executive producer of color and finishing at Nice Shoes, a post production studio in New York City. I am not an engineer and I am not an artist, so why would an EP go to NAB? I went because one of my main goals for 2016 is to make sure the studio remains at the forefront of technology. While I feel that our engineering team and artists represent us well in that respect, I wanted to make sure that I, along with our producers, were fully educated on these emerging technologies.

One of our first priorities for NAB was to meet with top monitor manufacturers to hopefully land on what UHD HDR monitors we would find to meet our standards for professional client viewing. We came to the conclusion that the industry is not there yet and we have more research to do before we upgrade our studio viewing environments.

Everyone with me was in agreement. They aren’t where they need to be. Most are only outputting around 400-800 nits and are experiencing luminance and contrast issues. None of this should stop the process of coloring for HDR. For the master monitor for the colorist, the Sony BVM-X300 OLED master monitor, which we are currently using, seems to be the ideal choice as you can still work in traditional Rec 709 as well as Rec 2020 for HDR.

After checking out some monitors, we headed to the FilmLight booth to go over the 5.0 upgrades to Baselight. Our colorist Ron Sudul, along with Nice Shoes Creative Studio VFX supervisor Adrian Winter, sat with myself and the FilmLight reps to discuss the upgrades, which included incredible new isolation tracking capabilities.  These upgrades will reinvent what can be achieved in the color suite: from realtime comps to retouch being done in color. The possibilities are exciting.

I also spent time learning about the upgrades to Filmlight’s Flip, which is their on-set color hardware. The Flip can allow you to develop your color look on set, apply it during your edit process (with the Baselight plug-in for Avid) and refine it in final color, all without affecting your RAW files. In addition to the Flip, they developed a software that supports on-set look development and grading called Prelight. I asked if these new technologies could enable us to even do high-end things like sky replacements on set and was told that the hardware within the Flip very well could.

We also visited our friends at DFT, the manufacturers of the Scanity film scanner, to catch up and discuss the business of archiving. With Scanity, Nice Shoes can scan 4K when other scanners only scan up to 2K resolution. This is a vital tool in not only preserving past materials, but in future proofing for emerging formats when archiving scans from film.

VR
On Sunday evening before the exhibits opened, we attended a panel on VR that was hosted by the Foundry. At this event we got to experience a few of the most talked about VR projects including Defrost, one of the first narrative VR films, from the director of Grease, Randal Kleiser, who was on the panel along with moderator Morris May (CEO/founder, Specular Theory), Bryn Mooser (co-founder, RYOT), Tim Dillon (executive producer, MPC) and Jake Black (head of VR, Create Advertising).

The Foundry’s VR panel.

The panel inspired me to delve deeper into the VR world, and on Wednesday I spent most of my last day exploring the Virtual & Augmented Reality Pavilion. In addition to seeing the newest VR camera rig offerings and experiencing a live VR feed, as well as demo-ing the Samsung Gear, I explored viewing options for the color workflow. Some people I spoke to mentioned that multiple Oculus set-ups all attached to a single feed was the way to go for color workflow, but another option that we did a very preliminary exploration of was the “dome” possibility, which offers a focused 180-degree view for everyone involved to comment on the same section of a VR scene. This would enable all involved to be sure they are experiencing and viewing the same thing at the same time.

HDR Workflow
Another panel we attended was about HDR workflows. Nice Shoes has already had the opportunity to work on HDR material and have begun to develop workflows for this emerging medium. Most HDR deliverables are for episodic and long form for such companies as Netflix, Hulu and the like. It may be some time before commercial clients are requesting an HDR deliverable, but the workflows will be much the same so the development being performed now is extremely valuable.

My biggest take away was that there are still no set standards. There’s Dolby Vision vs. HDR 10 vs. PQ vs. others. But it appears that everyone agrees that standards are not needed right now. We need to get tools into the hands of the artists and figure out what works best. Standards will come out of that. The good news is that we appear to be future-proofed for the standard to change. Meaning for the most part, every camera we are shooting on is shooting for HDR and should standards change — say from 1000 nits to 10,000 nits — the footage and process is still there to go back in and color for the new request.

Summing Up
I truly believe my time spent at NAB has prepared me for the myriad of questions that will be put forth throughout the year and will help us develop our workflows to evolve the creative process of post. I’ll be sure to be there again next year in order to prepare myself for the questions of 2017 and beyond.

Our Main Image: The view walking into the South Hall Lower at the LVCC.


Sony at NAB with new 4K OLED monitor, 4K, 8X Ultra HFR camera

At last year’s NAB, Sony introduced its first 4K OLED reference monitor for critical viewing — the BVM-X300. This year, Sony added a new monitor, the the PVM-X550, a 55-inch, OLED panel with 12-bit signal processing, perfect for client viewing. The Trimaster EL PVM-X550 supports HDR through various Electro-Optical Transfer Functions (EOTF), such as S-Log3, SMPTE ST.2084 and Hybrid Log-Gamma, covering applications for both cinematography and broadcast. The PVM-X550 is a quad-view OLED monitor, which allows customized individual display settings across four distinct views in HD. It is equipped with the same signal-processing engine as the BVM-X300, providing a 12-bit output signal for picture accuracy and consistency. It also supports industry standard color spaces including the wider ITU-R BT.2020 for Ultra High Definition.

HFR Camera
At NAB 2016, Sony displayed their newest camera system: the HDC-4800 combines 4K resolution with enhanced high frame rate capabilities, capturing up to 8X at 4K, and 16X in full HD. “This camera system can do a lot of everything — very high frame rate, very high resolution,” said Rob Willox, marketing manager for content creation, Sony Electronics.

I broke the second paragraph into two, and they are now: The HDC-4800 uses a new Super 35mm 4K CMOS sensor, supporting a wide color space (both BT.2020 and BT.709), and provides an industry standard PL lens mount, giving the system the capability of using the highest quality cinematic lenses for clear and crisp high resolution images.The new sensor brings the system into the cinematic family of RED and Alexa, making it well suited as a competitor to today’s modern, high end cinematic digital solutions.

An added feature of the HDC-4800 is how it’s specifically designed to integrate with Sony’s companion system, the Sony HDC-4300, a 2/3 inch image sensor 4k/HD camera. Using matching colorimetry and deep toolset camera adjustments, and with the ability to take advantage of existing build-up kits, remote control panels and master setup units, the two cameras can blend seamlessly.

Archive
Sony also showed the second generation of its Optical Disc Archive System, which adopts new, high-capacity optical media, rated with a 100 year shelf life with double the transfer rate and double the capacity of a single cartridge at 3.3 TB. The Generation 2 Optical Disc Archive System also adds an 8-channel optical drive unit, doubling the read/write speeds of the previous generation, helping to meet the data needs of real-time 4K production.

NAB 1/17