Category Archives: HDR

Canon targets HDR with EOS C200, C200B cinema cameras

Canon has grown its Cinema EOS line of pro cinema cameras with the EOS C200 and EOS C200B. These new offerings target filmmakers and TV productions. They offer two 4K video formats — Canon’s new Cinema RAW Light and MP4 — and are optimized for those interested in shooting HDR video.

Alongside a newly developed dual Digic DV6 image processing system, Canon’s Dual Pixel CMOS AF system and improved operability for pros, these new cameras are built for capturing 4K video across a variety of production applications.

Based on feedback from Cinema EOS users, these new offerings will be available in two configurations, while retaining the same core technologies within. The Canon EOS C200 is a production-ready solution that can be used right out of the box, accompanied by an LCD monitor, LCD attachment, camera grip and handle unit. The camera also features a 1.77 million-dot OLED electronic view finder (EVF). For users who need more versatility and the ability to craft custom setups tailored to their subject or environment, the C200B offers cinematographers the same camera without these accessories and the EVF to optimize shooting using a gimbal, drone or a variety of other configurations.

Canon’s Peter Marr was at Cine Gear demo-ing the new cameras.

New Features
Both cameras feature the same 8.85MP CMOS sensor that combines with a newly developed dual Digic DV6 image processing system to help process high-resolution image data and record video from full HD (1920×1080) and 2K (2048×1080) to 4K UHD (3840×2160) and 4K DCI (4096×2160). A core staple of the third-generation Cinema EOS system, this new processing platform offers wide-ranging expressive capabilities and improved operation when capturing high-quality HDR video.

The combination of the sensor and a newly developed processing system also allows for the support for two new 4K file formats designed to help optimize workflow and make 4K and HDR recording more accessible to filmmakers. Cinema RAW Light, available in 4K 60p/50p at 10-bit and 30p/25p/24p at 12-bit, allows users to record data internally to a CFast card by cutting data size to about one-third to one-fifth of a Cinema RAW file, without losing grading flexibility. Due to the reduced file size, users will appreciate rich dynamic range and easier post processing without sacrificing true 4K quality. Alongside recording to a CFast card, proxy data (MP4) can also be simultaneously recorded to an SD card for use in offline editing.

Additionally, filmmakers will also be able to export 4K in MP4 format on SD media cards at 60/50/30/25/24P at 8-bit. Support for UHD recording allows for use in cinema and broadcasting applications or scenarios where long recording times are needed while still maintaining top image quality. The digital cinema cameras also offer slow-motion full-HD recording support at up to 120fps.

The Canon EOS C200and Canon EOS C200B feature Innovative Focus Control that helps assist with 4K shooting that demands precise focusing, whether from single or remote operation. According to Canon, its Dual Pixel CMOS AF technology helps to expand the distance of the subject area to enable faster focus during 4K video recording. This also allows for highly accurate continuous AF and face detection AF when using EF lenses. For 4K video opportunities that call for precise focus accuracy that can’t be checked on an HD monitor, users can also take advantage of the LCD Monitor LM-V1 (supplied with the EOS C200 camera), which provides intuitive touch focusing support to help filmmakers achieve sophisticated focusing even as a single operator.

In addition to these features, the cameras offer:
• Oversampling HD processing: enhances sensitivity and helps minimize noise
• Wide DR Gamma: helps reduce overexposure by retaining continuity with a gamma curve
• ISO 100-102400 and 54db gain: high quality in both low sensitivity and low-light environments
• In-camera ND filter: internal ND unit allows cleaning of glass for easier maintenance
• ACESproxy support: delivers standardized color space in images, helping to improve efficiency
• Two SD card and one CFast card slots for internal recording
• Improved grip and Cinema-EOS-system-compatible attachment method
• Support for Canon Cine-Servo and EF cinema lenses

Editing and grading of the Cinema RAW Light video format will be supported in Blackmagic Resolve. Editing will also be possible in Avid Media Composer, using a Canon RAW plugin for Avid Media Access. This format can also be processed using the Canon application, Cinema RAW Development.

Also, Premiere Pro CC of Adobe will support this format until the end of 2017. Editing will also be possible in Final Cut Pro X from Apple, using the Canon RAW Plugin for Final Cut Pro X after the second half of this year.

The Canon EOS C200 and EOS C200B are scheduled to be available in August for estimated retail prices of $7,499 and $5,999, respectively. The EOS C200 comes equipped with additional accessories including the LM-V1 LCD monitor, LA-V1 LCD attachment, GR-V1 camera grip and HDU-2 handle unit. Available in September, these accessories will also be sold separately.

Bluefish444 supports Adobe CC and 4K HDR with Epoch card

Bluefish444 Epoch video audio and data I/O cards now support the advanced 4K high dynamic range (HDR) workflows offered in the latest versions of the Adobe Creative Cloud.

Epoch SDI and HDMI solutions are suited for Adobe’s Premiere Pro CC, After Effects CC, Audition CC and other tools that are part of the Creative Cloud. With GPU-accelerated performance for emerging post workflows, including 4K HDR and video over IP, Adobe and Bluefish444 are providing a strong option for pros.

Bluefish444’s Adobe Mercury Transmit support for Adobe Creative Cloud brings improved performance in demanding workflows requiring realtime video I/O from UHD and 4K HDR sequences.

Bluefish444 Epoch video card support adds:
• HD/SD SDI input and output
• 4K/2K SDI input and output
• 12/10/8-bit SDI input and output
• 4K/2K/HD/SD HDMI preview
• Quad split 4K UHD SDI
• Two sample interleaved 4K UHD SDI
• 23, 24, 25, 29, 30fps video input and output
• 48, 50, 59, 60fps video input and output
• Dual-link 1.5Gbps SDI
• 3Gbps level A & B SDI
• Quad link 1.5Gbps and 3Gbps SDI
• AES digital audio
• Analog audio monitoring
• RS-422 machine control
• 12-bit video color space conversions

“Recent updates have enabled performance which was previously unachievable,” reports Tom Lithgow, product manager at Bluefish444. “Thanks to GPU acceleration, and [the] Adobe Mercury Transmit plug-in, Bluefish444 and Adobe users can be confident of smooth realtime video performance for UHD 4K 60fps and HDR content.”

Dell 6.15

Sony’s offerings at NAB

By Daniel Rodriguez

Sony has always been a company that prioritizes and implements the requests of the customer. They are constantly innovation throughout all aspects of production — from initial capture to display. At NAB 2017, Sony’s goal was to further expand benchmarks the company has made in the past few months.

To reflect its focus as a company, Sony’s NAB booth was focused on four areas: image capture, media solutions, IP Live and HDR (High Dynamic Range). Sony’s focus was to demonstrate its ability to anticipate for future demands in capture and distribution while introducing firmware updates to many of their existing products to complement these future demands.

Cameras
Since Sony provides customers and clients with a path from capture to delivery, it’s natural to start with what’s new for imaging. Having already tackled the prosumer market with its introduction of the a7sii, a7rii, FS5 and FS7ii, and firmly established its presence in the cinema camera line with the Sony F5, F55 and F65, it’s natural that Sony’s immediate steps weren’t to follow up on these models so soon, but rather introduce models that fit more specific needs and situations.

The newest Sony camera introduced at NAB was the UMC-S3CA. Sporting the extremely popular sensor from the a7sii, the UMC-S3CA is a 4K interchangeable lens E mount camera that is much smaller than its sensor sibling. Its Genlock ability allows any user to monitor, operate and sync many at a time, something extremely promising for emerging media like VR and 360 video. It boasts an incredible ISO range from 100-409,600 and recording internal 4K UHD recording at 23.98p, 25fps and 29.97p in 100Mbps and 60Mbps modes. The size of this particularly small camera is promising for those who love the a7sii but want to employ it in more specific cases, such as crash cams, drones, cranes and sliders.

To complement its current camera line, Sony has released an updated version of their electronic viewfinder DVF-EL100 —the DVF-EL200 (pictured)— which also boasts a full 1920x1080p resolution image and is about twice as bright as the previous model. Much like updated versions of Sony’s cameras, this monitor’s ergonomics are attributed to the vast input from users of the previous model, something that the company prides itself on. (Our main image show the F55 with the DVF-EL200 viewfinder.)

Just because Sony is introducing new products doesn’t mean that it has forgotten about older products, especially those that are part of its camera lines. Prosumer models, like the Sony PXW-Z150 and Sony PXW-FS5, to professional cinema cameras, such as the Sony PMW-F5 and PMW-F55, are all receiving firmware updates coming in July 2017.

The most notable firmware update of the Z150 will be its ability to capture images in HLG (Hybrid Log Gamma) to support easier HDR capture and workflow. The FS5 will also receive the ability to capture in HLG, in addition to the ability to change the native ISO from 2000 to 3200 when shooting in SLog2 or SLog3 and 120fps capabilities at 1080p full HD. While many consider the F65 to be Sony’s flagship camera, some consider the F55 to be the more industry friendly of Sony’s cinema camera line, and Sony backs that up by increasing it’s high frame rate capture in a new firmware update. This new firmware update will allow the F55 to record in 72, 75, 90, 96 and 100fps in 4K RAW and in the company’s new compressed Extended Original Camera Negative (X-OCN) format.

X-OCN
Sony’s new X-OCN codec continues to be a highlight of the company’s developments as it boasts an incredible 16-bit bit-depth despite it being compressed, and it’s virtually indistinguishable from Sony’s own RAW format. Due to its compression, it boasts file sizes that are equivalent to 50 percent less than 2K 4:3 Arriraw and 4K ProRes 4444 XQ and 30 percent less than F55 RAW. It’s considered the most optimal and suitable format for HDR content capturing. With cameras like the F5, F55 and its smaller alternatives, like the FS7 and FS7II allowing RAW recording, Sony is offering a nearly indistinguishable alternative to cut down on storage space as well as allow more recording time on set.

Speed and Storage
As Sony continues to increase its support for HDR and larger resolutions like 8K, it’s easy to consider the emergence of X-OCN as an introduction of what to expect from Sony in the future.

Despite the introduction of X-OCN being the company’s answer to large file sizes from shooting RAW, Sony still maintain a firm understanding of the need for storage and the read/write speeds that come with such innovations. As part of such innovations, Sony has introduced the AXS-AR1 AXS memory and SXS Thunderbolt card reader. Using a Thunderbolt 2 connector, which can be daisy-chained since the reader has two inputs, the reader has a theoretical transfer speed of approximately 9.6Gbps, or 1200MBps. Supporting SxS and Sony’s new AXS cards, if one were to download an hour’s worth of true 4K footage at 24fps, shot in X-OCN, it would only take about 2.5 minutes to complete the transfer.

To complement these leaps in storage space and read/write speeds, Sony’s Optical Disc Archive Generation 2 is designed as an optic disc-based storage media with expandable robotic libraries called PetaSites, which through the use of 3.3TB Optical Disc Archive Cartridges guarantee a staggering 100-year shelf life. Unlike LTOs, which are generally only used a handful of times for storing and retrieving, Sony’s optical discs can be quickly and randomly accessed as needed.

HDR
HDR continues to gain traction in the world of broadcast and cinema. From capture to monitoring, the introduction of HDR has spurred many companies to implement new ways to create, monitor, display and distribute HDR content. As mentioned earlier, Sony is implementing firmware updates in many of its cameras to allow internal HLG, or Instant HDR, capture without the need for color grading, as well as compressed X-OCN RAW recording to allow more complex HDR grading to be possible without the massive amounts of data that uncompressed RAW takes up.

HDR gamma displays can now be monitored on screens like the Sony FS5’s, as well as higher-end displays such as their BVM E171, BVM X300/2 and PVM X550.

IP Live
What stood out about Sony’s mission with HDR is to further implement its use in realtime, non-fiction content, and broadcasts like sporting events through IP Live. The goal is to offer instantaneous conversions to not only output media in 4K HDR and SDR but also offer full HD HDR and SDR at the same time. With its SR Live System Sony hopes to implement updates in their camera lines with HLG to provide instant HDR which can be processed through its HDRC-4000 converters. As the company’s business model has stated Sony’s goal is to offer full support throughout the production process, which has led to the introduction of XDCAM Air, which will be an ENG-based cloud service that addresses the growing need for speed to air. XDCAM Air will launch in June 2017.

Managing Files
To round out its production through delivery goals, Sony continues with Media Backbone Navigator X, which is designed to be an online content storage and management solution to ease the work between capture and delivery. It accepts nearly any file type and allows multiple users to easily search for keywords and even phrases spoken in videos while being able to stream in realtime speeds.

Media Backbone Navigator X is designed for productions that create an environment of constant back and forth and will eliminate any excessive deliberation when figuring out storage and distribution of materials.

Sony’s goal at NAB wasn’t to shock or awe but rather to build on an established foundation for current and new clients and customers who are readying for an ever-changing production environment. For Sony, this year’s NAB could be considered preparation for the “upcoming storm” as firmware updates roll out more support for promising formats like HDR.


Daniel Rodriquez is a New York-based cinematographer, photographer and director. Follow him on Instragram: https://www.instagram.com/realdanrodriguez.


My NAB 2017 top five

By Brady Betzel

So once again, I didn’t go to NAB. I know, I should go, but to be honest I get caught up in my day job and my family, so usually I forget about NAB until the week before and by that time it’s too late to pull off. I’m hoping to go next year, like really hoping I make plans.

So there or not, I was paying close attention to the announcements that came out of new products, and even updates to older products. Let’s be real, other than doing some face-to-face networking, you can really get the same if not more info by lurking online. Below are five announcements that really got my attention.

Blackmagic’s DaVinci Resolve 14
Blackmagic saw that this year’s Resolve update from 12.5.5 to 14 is so good they skipped 13. There was a significant drop in the DaVinci Resolve Studio price from $999 to $299, while adding features that many of the top NLE/color correction software dogs are lacking.

The beauty of Resolve is that it is first and foremost an industry-proven color correction powerhouse, one that is used on many of the top movies and television shows in the industry.

They are also expanding their footprint laterally to encompass professional audio as well as professional video. In Resolve 14, Blackmagic has added a Fairlight audio page to allow for a much more Pro Tools-like editing experience within the same Resolve app we have all grown to become extremely excited about. In my mind that means that at a professional facility, or your own garage, you can have a editor/colorist sitting with a re-recording engineer to review a movie or a show with the client at the same time.

The Fairlight page within Resolve 14.

As long as you have two separate workstations, the colorist and audio mixer can be addressing notes on the same sequence inside of Resolve 14 because of the newly updated collaboration enhancements. The Audio mixer or colorist could then refresh their sequence to update it with any changes the other had made and see them immediately reflected.

I haven’t gotten my hands on this update in a proper environment to test out the collaboration functionality, but the timeline comparison and review features seem like a godsend to anyone who does any sort of conform work. It is the beginning of Blackmagic’s path toward Avid Media Composer’s lock on the industry with their sequence and project sharing.

On Twitter, Blackmagic’s director of DaVinci software engineering, Rohit Gupta answered my question about whether EDLs and AAFs will fall in line with the timeline review. He said it will work “irrespective of how you create the timeline. So it will work with EDL/AAF too.”

Clip, sequence and bin locking are the future for collaborative workflow inside of Resolve. I would love to see how someone uses these features in a large collaborative environment of 10 or more editors, sound editors and colorists. How does Resolve 14 handle multiple sequence updates and multiple people knocking on a bin? How does Resolve work on something like an Avid Nexis?

Moving on, while I’m not an audio guy I do realize that Fairlight is a big player in the pro audio industry, maybe not as sizable a footprint as Avid Pro Tools in the United States, but it still has its place. So Blackmagic inserting Fairlight technology, including hardware compatibility, into Resolve 14 is remarkable.

The Resolve 14 update seems to have been focused on everything but the color correction tools. Except for the supposed major speed boost and options like face tracking, Blackmagic is putting all its eggs into the general NLE basket. It doesn’t bother me that much to be honest, and I think Blackmagic is picking up where a few other NLE players are leaving off. I just hope they don’t spread Resolve so thin that it loses its core audience. But again, with the price of Resolve 14 Studio coming in at $299 it’s becoming the major player in the post nonlinear editor, color correction, and now audio finishing market.

Keep in mind, Resolve 14 is technically still in beta so you will most likely run into bugs, probably mostly under the Fairlight tab, so be careful if you plan on using this version in time-critical environments.

You can find all of Blackmagic’s NAB 2017 updates at www.blackmagicdesign.com, including a new ATEM Studio Pro HD switcher, UltraStudio HD Mini with Thunderbolt 3 and even a remote Bluetooth camera control app for the Ursa Mini Pro.

SmallHD Focus
There was a lot of buzz online about SmallHD’s Focus monitor. It’s an HDMI-based external touchscreen monitor that is supposedly two to three times brighter than your DSLR’s monitor. People online were commenting about how bright the monitor actually was and about the $499 price tag. It looks like it will be released in June, and I can’t wait to see it.

In addition to being a bright external monitor it has a built-in waveform, false color, focus assist, 3D LUTs, Pixel Zoom and many more features. I really like the feature that offers auxiliary power out to power your camera with the Focus’ Sony L Series battery. You can check it out here.

Atomos Sumo
Another external monitor that was being talked about was the 1,200-nit Atomos 19-inch Sumo, a self-proclaimed “on-set and in-studio 4Kp60 HDR 19-inch monitor-recorder.” It boasts some heavy specs, like the ability to record 4K 12bit Raw and 10-bit ProRes/DNxHR — plus it’s 19 inches!

What’s really smart is that it can double as an HDR grading monitor back in the edit suite. It will map color formats Log, PQ and HLG with its AtomHDR engine. Technically, it supports Sony SLog2/SLog3, Canon CLog/CLog 2, Arri Log C, Panasonic Vlog, JVC JLog, Red LogFilm Log formats and Sony SGamut/SGamut3/SGamut3.cine, Canon Cinema, BT2020, DCI P3, DCI P3+, Panasonic V Gamut and Arri Alexa Wide Gamut color gamuts. While the Sumo will record in 4K, it’s important to note that the monitor is actually a 10-bit, 1920×1080 resolution monitor with SDI and HDMI inputs and outputs.

The Atomos Sumo is available for pre-order now for $2,495. Get the complete list of specs here.

Avid Everywhere
This year, Avid Media Composer editors saw a roadmap for future updates like an updated Title Tool that is higher than HD compatible (finally!), an advanced color correction mode and Avid Everywhere based on the MediaCentral platform.

If you’ve ever seen an app like Avid Media Composer work through the cloud, you will probably agree how amazing it is. If you haven’t, essentially you will log in to Media Composer via a web browser or a light on machine app that runs all of the hard processing on the server that you are logging in to. The beauty of this is that you can essentially log in wherever you want and edit. Since the hard work is being done on the other end you can log in using a laptop or even a tablet that has decent Internet speed and edit high-resolution media. Here comes that editing on the beach job I was wanting. You can check out all of the Avid Everywhere updates here.

In addition Avid announced Media Composer First — a free version of Media Composer. They also released an updated IO – DNxIQ, essentially with the Thunderbolt 3 update along with a live cross-convert .

Sony a9
With all eyes on Sony to reveal the most anticipated full frame cameras in prosumer history — a7RIII and a7SIII — we are all surprised when they unveiled the 24.4MP a9. The a9 is Sony’s answer to heavy weights Canon and Nikon professional full-frame cameras that have run the markets for years.

With a pretty amazing blackout-free continuous shooting ability alongside an Ethernet port and dual SD card slots, the a9 is a beauty. While I am not a huge fan of Sony’s menu setup, I am really interested to see the footage and images come out on the web; there is something great about Sony’s images and video in my eyes. Besides my personal thoughts, there is also a five-axis in-body stabilization, UHD (3840×2160) video recording across the entire width of the sensor and even Super 35 recording. Check out more info here .

In the end, NAB 2017 was a little lackluster in terms of barn-burner hardware and software releases, however I feel that Blackmagic has taken the cake with the DaVinci Resolve 14 release. Keep in mind Blackmagic is also releasing updates to products like the Ursa Mini Pro, new Hyperdeck Studio Mini and updates to the ultra-competitive Blackmagic Video Assist, adding ever-valuable scopes.


Brady Betzel is an Emmy-nominated online editor at Margarita Mix in Hollywood, working on Life Below Zero and Cutthroat Kitchen. You can email Brady at bradybetzel@gmail.com. Follow him on Twitter @allbetzroff.


Eizo intros DCI-4K reference monitor for HDR workflows

Eizo will be at NAB next week demonstrating its ColorEdge Prominence CG3145 31.1-inch reference monitor, which offers DCI-4K resolution (4096×2160) for pro HDR post workflows.

Eizo says the ColorEdge Prominence CG3145 can display both very bright and very dark areas on the screen without sacrificing the integrity of either. The monitor achieves the 1000cd/m (typical) high brightness level needed for an HDR content display. It can achieve a typical contrast ratio of 1,000,000:1 for displaying true blacks.

The ColorEdge Prominence CG3145 supports both the HLG (Hybrid Log-Gamma) and PQ (Perceptual Quantization) curves so post pros can rely on a monitor compliant with industry standards for HDR video.

The ColorEdge Prominence CG3145 supports various video formats, including HDMI input compatible with 10-bit 4:2:2 at 50/60p. The DisplayPort input supports up to 10-bit 4:4:4 at 50/60p. Additional features include 98 percent of the DCI-P3 color space smooth gradations with 10-bit display from a 24-bit LUT (look-up-table) and an optional light-shielding hood.
The ColorEdge Prominence CG3145 will begin shipping in early 2018.

In addition to the new ColorEdge Prominence CG3145 HDR reference monitor, Eizo currently offers optional HLG and PQ curves for many of its current CG Series monitors. The optimized gamma curves render images to appear more true to how the human eye perceives the real world compared to SDR. This HDR gamma support is available as an option for ColorEdge CG318-4K, CG248-4K, CG277 and CG247X. Both gamma curves were standardized by the ITU as ITU-R BT.2100. In addition, the PQ curve was standardized by SMPTE as ST-2084.


Assimilate Scratch and Scratch VR Suite upgraded to V.8.6

Assimilate is now offering an open beta for Scratch 8.6 and the Scratch VR Suite 8.6, the latest versions of its realtime post tools and workflow — VR/360 and 2D/3D content, from dailies to conform grading, compositing and finishing. Expanded HDR functions are featured throughout the product line, including in Scratch VR, which now offers stitching capabilities.

Both open beta versions gives pros the opportunity to actively use the full suite of Scratch and Scratch VR tools, while evaluating and submitting requests and recommendations for additional features or updates.

Scratch Web for cloud-based, realtime review and collaboration, and Scratch Play for immediate review and playback, are also included in the ecosystem updates. Both products support VR/360 and 2D/3D content.

Current users of the Scratch VR Suite 8.5 and Scratch Finishing 8.5 can download the Scratch 8.6 open beta. Scratch 8.6 open beta and the Scratch VR Suite open beta are available now.

“V8.6 is a major update for both Scratch and the Scratch VR Suite with significant enhancements to the HDR and ACES workflows. We’ve added stitching to the VR toolset so that creators have a complete and streamlined end-to-end VR workflow,” says Jeff Edson, CEO at Assimilate. “The open Beta helps us to continue developing the best and most useful post production features and techniques all artists need to perfect their creativity in color grading and finishing. We act on all input, much of it immediately and some in regular updates.”

Here are some details of the update:

HDR
• PQ and HLG transfer functions are now an integral part of Scratch color management.
• Scopes automatically switch to HDR mode if needed and show levels in a nit-scale; highlights any reference level that you set.
• At the project level, define the HDR mastering metadata: color space, color primaries and white levels, luminance levels and more. The metadata is automatically included in the Video HDMI interface (AJA, BMD, Bluefish444) for display.
• Static metadata has the function to calculate dynamic luminance metadata like MaxCLL and MaxFall.
• HDR footage can be published directly to YouTube with HDR metadata.

VR/360 – Scratch VR Suite
• 360 stitching functionality: load all your source media from your 360 cameras into Scratch VR and combine it to a single equirectangular image. Support for camera stitch templates: AutoPano projects, Hugin and PTStitch scripts.
• Ambisonic Audio: Scratch VR can load, set and playback ambisonic audio files to complete the 360 immersive experience.
• Video with 360 sound can be published directly to YouTube 360.
• Additional overlay handles to the existing 2D-equirectangular feature for more easily positioning 2D elements in a 360 scene.

DIT Reporting Function
• Create a report of all clips of either a timeline, a project or just a selection of shots.
• Reports include metadata, such as a thumbnail, clip-name, timecode, scene, take, comments and any metadata attached to a clip.
• Choose from predefined templates or create your own.


Mozart in the Jungle

The colorful dimensions of Amazon’s Mozart in the Jungle

By Randi Altman

How do you describe Amazon’s Mozart in the Jungle? Well, in its most basic form it’s a comedy about the changing of the guard — or maestro — at the New York Philharmonic, and the musicians that make up that orchestra. When you dig deeper you get a behind-the-scenes look at the back-biting and crazy that goes on in the lives and heads of these gifted artists.

Timothy Vincent

Timothy Vincent

Based on the novel Mozart in the Jungle: Sex, Drugs, and Classical Music by oboist Blair Tindall, the series — which won the Golden Globe last year and was nominated this year — has shot in a number of locations over its three seasons, including Mexico and Italy.

Since its inception, Mozart in the Jungle has been finishing in 4K and streaming in both SDR and HDR. We recently reached out to Technicolor’s senior color timer, Timothy Vincent, who has been on the show since the pilot to find out more about the show’s color workflow.

Did Technicolor have to gear up infrastructure-wise for the show’s HDR workflow?
We were doing UHD 4K already and were just getting our HDR workflows worked out.

What is the workflow from offline to online to color?
The dailies are done in New York based on the Alexa K1S1 709 LUT. (Technicolor On-Location Services handled dailies out of Italy, and Technicolor PostWorks in New York.) After the offline and online, I get the offline reference made with the dailies so I can look at if I have a question about what was intended.

If someone was unsure about watching in HDR versus SDR, what would you tell them?
The emotional feel of both the SDR and the HDR is the same. That is always the goal in the HDR pass for Mozart. One of the experiences that is enhanced in the HDR is the depth of field and the three-dimensional quality you gain in the image. This really plays nicely with the feel in the landscapes of Italy, the stage performances where you feel more like you are in the audience, and the long streets of New York just to name a few.

Mozart in the JungleWhen I’m grading the HDR version, I’m able to retain more highlight detail than I was in the SDR pass. For someone who has not yet been able to experience HDR, I would actually recommend that they watch an episode of the show in SDR first and then in HDR so they can see the difference between them. At that point they can choose what kind of viewing experience they want. I think that Mozart looks fantastic in both versions.

What about the “look” of the show. What kind of direction where you given?
We established the look of the show based on conversations and collaboration in my bay. It has always been a filmic look with soft blacks and yellow warm tones as the main palette for the show. Then we added in a fearlessness to take the story in and out of strong shadows. We shape the look of the show to guide the viewers to exactly the story that is being told and the emotions that we want them to feel. Color has always been used as one of the storytelling tools on the show. There is a realistic beauty to the show.

What was your creative partnership like with the show’s cinematographer, Tobias Datum?
I look forward to each episode and discovering what Tobias has given me as palette and mood for each scene. For Season 3 we picked up where we left off at the end of Season 2. We had established the look and feel of the show and only had to account for a large portion of Season 3 being shot in Italy. Making sure to feel the different quality of light and feel of the warmth and beauty of Italy. We did this by playing with natural warm skin tones and the contrast of light and shadow he was creating for the different moods and locations. The same can be said for the two episodes in Mexico in Season 2. I know now what Tobias likes and can make decisions I’m confident that he will like.

Mozart in the JungleFrom a director and cinematographer’s point of view, what kind of choices does HDR open up creatively?
It depends on if they want to maintain the same feel of the SDR or if they want to create a new feel. If they choose to go in a different direction, they can accentuate the contrast and color more with HDR. You can keep more low-light detail while being dark, and you can really create a separate feel to different parts of the show… like a dream sequence or something like that.

Any workflow tricks/tips/trouble spots within the workflow or is it a well-oiled machine at this point?
I have actually changed the way I grade my shows based on the evolution of this show. My end results are the same, but I learned how to build grades that translate to HDR much easier and consistently.

Do you have a color assistant?
I have a couple of assistants that I work with who help me with prepping the show, getting proxies generated, color tracing and some color support.

What tools do you use — monitor, software, computer, scope, etc.?
I am working on Autodesk Lustre 2017 on an HP Z840, while monitoring on both a Panasonic CZ950 and a Sony X300. I work on Omnitek scopes off the downconverter to 2K. The show is shot on both Alexa XT and Alexa Mini, framing for 16×9. All finishing is done in 4K UHD for both SDR and HDR.

Anything you would like to add?
I would only say that everyone should be open to experiencing both SDR and HDR and giving themselves that opportunity to choose which they want to watch and when.


Bluefish444 offering new range of I/O cards with Kronos

Bluefish444, makers of uncompressed 4K/2K/HD/SD video I/O cards for Windows, Mac OS X and Linux, has introduced the Kronos range of video and audio I/O cards. The new line extends the feature set of Bluefish444’s Epoch video cards, which support up to 4K 60 frame per second workflows. Kronos is developed for additional workflows requiring Ultra HD up to 8K, high frame rates up to 120fps, high dynamic range and video over IP.

With these capabilities, Bluefish444 cards are developed to support all areas of TV and feature film production, post, display and restoration, in addition to virtual reality and augmented reality.

Kronos adds video processing technologies including resolution scaling, video interlace and de-interlace; hardware CODEC support, SDI to IP and IP to SDI conversion, and continues to offer the 12-bit color space conversion and low-latency capabilities of Epoch.

“With the choice of HD BNC SD/HD/3G connectivity, or SFP+ connectivity enabling greater than 3G SDI and Video over IP across 10Gbps Ethernet, the Kronos range will suit today’s demanding requirements and cover emerging technologies as they mature,” says product manager Tom Lithgow. “4K ultra high definition, high frame rate and ultra-high frame rate video, high dynamic range, video over IP and hardware assisted processing are now available to OEM developers, professional content creators and system integrators with the Bluefish444 Kronos range.”

HDMI 2.0 I/O, additional SMPTE 2022 IP standards and emerging IP standards are earmarked for future support via firmware update.

Kronos will offer the choice of SDI I/O connectivity with the Kronos elektron featuring eight high-density BNC connectors capable of SD/HD/3G SDI. Each HD BNC connector is fully bi-directional enabling numerous configuration options, including eight input, eight output, or a mixture of SDI input and output connections.

The Kronos optikós offers future proofing connectivity with three SFP+ cages in addition to two HD BNC connectors for SD/HD/3G SDI I/O. The SFP+ cages on Kronos optikós provide limitless connectivity options, exposing greater than 3G SDI, IP connectivity across 10Gb Ethernet, and flexibility to choose from numerous physical interfaces.

All Kronos cards will have an eight-lane Gen 3 PCIe interface and will provide access to high bandwidth UHD, high frame rate and high dynamic range video IO and processing across traditional SDI and also emerging IP standards such as SMPTE 2022.

Kronos specs include:
* SD SMPTE295M
* HD 1.5G SMPTE292M
* 3G (A+B) SMPTE424M
* ASI
* 4:2:2:4 / 4:4:4:4 SDI
* Single Link / Dual Link / Quad Link interfaces
* 12/10-bit SDI
* Full 4K frame buffer
* 3Gbps Bypass Relays
* 12-bit video processing pipeline
* 4 x 4 x 32bit Matrix
* MR2 Routing resources
* Hardware Keyer (2K/HD)
* Customizable and flexible pixel formats
* AES Audio Input / AES Audio Output
* LTC I / O
* RS422
* Bi/Tri-level Genlock Input & Crosslocking
* Genlock loop through
* VANC complete access
* HANC Embedded Audio/Payload ID/Custom Packets/RP188
* MSA and Non-MSA compatible SFP+
* SMPTE 2022-6

The Kronos range will be available in Q4 2016 with pricing announced then.


Assimilate Scratch 8.5, Scratch VR Suite available for open beta

Assimilate is offering an open-beta version of Scratch 8.5, its realtime post system and workflow for dailies, conform, grading, compositing and finishing. Also in open beta is the Scratch VR Suite. Both open-beta versions give users the chance to work with the full suite of Scratch 8.5 and Scratch VR tools while evaluating and submitting requests and recommendations for additional features or updates.

Scratch Web for cloud-based, realtime review and collaboration, and Scratch Play for immediate review and playback, are also included in the ecosystem updates. Current users of Scratch 8.4 can download the Scratch 8.5 open beta. Those who are new to Scratch can access the Scratch 8.5 open-beta version for a 30-day free trial. The Scratch VR open-beta version can also be accessed for a 30-day free trial.

“Thanks to open-Beta programs, we get at lot of feedback from current Scratch users about the features and functions that will simplify their workflows, increase their productivity and enhance their storytelling,” explains Assimilate CEO Jeff Edson. “We have two significant Scratch releases a year for the open-beta program and then provide several incremental builds throughout the year. In this way Scratch is continually evolving to offer bleeding-edge functionality, as well as support for the latest formats, for example, Scratch was the first to support Arri’s mini-camera MXF format.”

New to Scratch 8.5
• Easy validation of availability of physical media and file references throughout a project, timeline and render
• Fast access to all external resources (media / LUT / CTL / etc.) through bookmarks
• Full set of ACES transforms as published by the Academy
• Publishing media directly to Facebook
• Option to launch Scratch from a command-line with a series of xml-script commands, which allows closer integration with post-infrastructure and third-party software and scripts

The new Scratch VR Suite includes all the features and functions of Scratch 8.5, Scratch Play and Scratch Web, plus substantial features, functions and enhancements that are specific to working in a 360 media environment.

New England SMPTE holding free session on UHD/HDR/HFR, more

The New England Section of SMPTE is holding a free day-long “New Technologies Boot Camp” that focuses on working with high resolution (UHD, 4K and beyond), high-dynamic-range (HDR) imaging and higher frame rates (HFR). In addition, they will discuss how to maintain resolution independence on screens of every size, as well as how to leverage IP and ATSC 3.0 for more efficient movement of this media content.

The boot camp will run from 9am to 9pm on May 19 at the Holiday Inn in Dedham, Massachusetts.

“These are exciting times for those of us working on the technical side of broadcasting, and the array of new formats and standards we’re facing can be a bit overwhelming,” says Martin P. Feldman, chair of SMPTE New England Section. “No one wants — or can afford — to be left behind. That’s why we’re gathering some of the industry’s foremost experts for a free boot camp designed to bring engineers up to speed on new technologies that enable more efficient creation and delivery of a better broadcast product.”

Boot camp presentations will include:

• “High-Dynamic-Range and Wide Color Gamut in Production and Distribution” by Hugo Gaggioni, chief technical officer at Sony Electronics.
• “4K/UHD/HFR/HDR — HEVC H.265 — ATSC 3.0” by Karl Kuhn of Tektronix.
• “Where Is 4K (UHD) Product Used Today — 4K Versus HFR — 4K and HFR Challenges” by Bruce Lane of Grass Valley.
• “Using MESH Networks” by Al Kornak of JVC Kenwood Corporation.
• “IP in Infrastructure-Building (Replacing HD-SDI Systems and Accommodating UHD)” by Paul Briscoe of Evertz Microsystems;
• “Scripted Versus Live Production Requirements” by Michael Bergeron of Panasonic.
• “The Transition from SDI to IP, Including IP Infrastructure and Monitoring” by John Shike of SAM (formerly Snell/Quantel).
• “8K, High-Dynamic-Range, OLED, Flexible Displays” by consultant Peter Putman.
• “HDR: The Great, the Okay, and the WTF” by Mark Schubin, engineer-in-charge at the Metropolitan Opera, Sesame Street and Great Performances (PBS).

The program will conclude with a panel discussion by the program’s presenters.

 No RSVP is required, and both SMPTE members and non-members are welcome.