Category Archives: Editing

Paris Can Wait director Eleanor Coppola

By Iain Blair

There are famous Hollywood dynasties, and then there’s the Coppolas, with such giant talents as Francis, Sofia, Roman, Nic Cage and the late Carmine.

While Eleanor, the matriarch of the clan and Francis’ wife, has long been recognized as a multi-talented artist in her own right, thanks to her acclaimed documentaries and books (Hearts of Darkness: A Filmmaker’s Apocalypse, Notes on the Making of Apocalypse Now, Notes on a Life), it’s only recently — at the grand age of 81 — that she’s written, produced and directed her feature film debut, Paris Can Wait.

Eleanor Coppola on set in France.

It stars Oscar-nominee Diane Lane as a woman who unexpectedly takes a trip through France, which reawakens her sense of self and her joie de vivre. At a crossroads in her life, and long married to an inattentive movie producer (Alec Baldwin), she finds herself taking a car trip from Cannes to Paris with a garrulous business associate of her husband. What should be a seven-hour drive turns into a journey of discovery involving mouthwatering meals, spectacular wines and picturesque sights.

Maybe it’s something in the water — or the famed Coppola wine, or her genes — but like her many family members, Eleanor Coppola seems to have a natural gift for capturing visual magic, and the French road trip unfolds like a sun-dappled adventure that makes you want to pack your bags and join the couple immediately.

I recently spoke with Coppola about making the film.

You began directing feature films at an age when most directors have long since retired. What took you so long?
I made documentaries, and my nature is to be an observer, so I never thought about doing a fiction film. But I had this true story, this trip I took with a Frenchman, and it felt like a really good basis for a road movie — and I love road movies — so I began writing it and included all these wonderful, picturesque places we stopped at, and someone suggested that we break down. Then my son said, “You should fix it,” so I gradually added all these textures and colors and flavors that would make it as rich as possible.

I heard it took a long time to write?
I began writing, and once I had the script together I began looking for a director, but I couldn’t quite find the right person. Then one morning at breakfast (my husband) Francis said, “You should direct it.” I’d never thought of directing it myself, so I took classes in directing and acting to prepare, but it ended up taking six years to bring all the elements together.

I assume getting financing was hard?
It was, especially as I’m not only a first-time feature director, but my movie has no aliens, explosions, kidnappings, guns, train wrecks — and nobody dies. It doesn’t have any of the usual elements that bankers want to invest in, so it took a long time to patch together the money — a bit here, a bit there. That was probably the hardest part of the whole thing. You can’t get the actors until you have the financing, and you can’t get the financing until you have the actors. It’s like Catch-22, and you’re caught in this limbo between the two while you try and get it all lined up.

After Francis persuaded you to direct it, did he give you a lot of encouragement and advice?
I asked him a lot about working with actors. I’ve been on so many sets with him and watched him directing, and he was very helpful and supportive, especially when we ran into the usual problems every film has.

I heard that just two weeks into shooting, the actor originally set to play Michael was unable to get out of another project?
Yes, and I was desperate to find a replacement, and it was such short notice. But by some miracle, Alec Baldwin called Francis about something, and he was able to fly over to France at the last moment and fill in. And other things happened. We were going to shoot the opening at the Hotel Majestic in Cannes, but a Saudi Arabian prince arrived and took over the entire hotel, so we had to scramble to find another location.

How long was the shoot?
Just 28 days, so it was a mad dash all over France, especially as we had so many locations I wanted to fit in. Pretty much every day, the AD and the production manager would come over to me after lunch and say, “Okay, you had 20 shots scheduled for today, but we’re going to have to lose four or five of them. Which ones would you like to cut?” So you’re in a constant state of anxiety and wondering if the shots you are getting will even cut together.Since we had so little time and money, we knew that we could never come back to a location if we missed something and that we’d have to cut some stuff out altogether, and there’s the daily race to finish before you lose light, so it was very difficult at times.

Where did you do the post?
All back at our home in Napa Valley, where we have editing and post production facilities all set up at the winery.

You worked with editor Glen Scantlebury, whose credits include Godfather III and Bram Stoker’s Dracula for Francis, Michael Bay’s The Rock, Armageddon and Transformers, Conair, The General’s Daughter and Tomb Raider. What did he bring to the project?
What happened was, I had a French editor who assembled the film while we were there, but it didn’t make financial sense to then bring her back to Napa, so Francis put me together with Glen and we worked really well together. He’s so experienced, but not just cutting these huge films. He’s also cut a lot of indies and smaller films and documentaries, and he did Palo Alto for (my granddaughter) Gia, so he was perfect for this. He didn’t come to France.

What were the main editing challenges?As they say, there are three films you make: the one you wrote, the one you shot and the one you then edit and get onto the screen. It’s always the same challenge of finding the best way of telling the story, and then we screened versions for people to see where any weaknesses were, and then we would go back and try to correct them. Glen is very creative, and he’d come up with fresh ways of dealing with any problems. We ended up spending a couple of months working on it, after he spent an initial month at home doing his own assembly.

I must say, I really enjoyed the editing process more than anything, because you get to relax more and shape the material like clay and mold it in a way you just can’t see when you’re in the middle of shooting it. I love the way you can move scenes around and juxtapose things that suddenly work in a whole new way.

Can you talk about the importance of sound and music?
They’re so important, and can radically alter a scene and the emotions an audience feels. I had the great pleasure of working with sound designer Richard Beggs, who won the Oscar for Apocalypse Now, and who’s done the sound for so many great films, including Rain Man and Harry Potter, and he’s worked with (my daughter) Sofia on some of her films like Lost in Translation and Marie Antoinette.

He’s a master of his craft and helped bring the film alive. Also, he recommended the composer Laura Karpman, who’s won several Emmys and worked with Spielberg and John Legend and all sorts of people. Music is really the weakest part for me, because I just don’t know what to do, and like Glen, Laura was just a perfect match for me. The first things she wrote were a little too dark, I felt, as I wanted this to be fun and light, and she totally got it, and also used all these great finger-snaps, and the score just really captures the feeling I wanted. We mixed everything up in Napa as well.

Eleanor Coppola and writer Iain Blair.

Do you want to direct another feature now, or was once enough?
I don’t have anything cooking that I want to make, but I’ve recently made two short story films, and I really enjoyed doing that since I didn’t have to wait for years to get the financing. I shot them in Northern California, and they were a joy to do.

There’s been a lot of talk about the lack of opportunity for women directors. What’s your advice to a woman who wants to direct?
Well, first off, it’s never too late! (Laughs) Look at me. I’m 81, and this is my first narrative film. Making any film is hard, finding the financing is even harder. Yes, it is a boy’s club, but if you have a story to tell never give up. Women should have a voice.


Industry insider Iain Blair has been interviewing the biggest directors in Hollywood and around the world for years. He is a regular contributor to Variety and has written for such outlets as Reuters, The Chicago Tribune, The Los Angeles Times and the Boston Globe.

Sight Sound & Story 2017: TV editing and Dylan Tichenor, ACE

By Amy Leland

This year, I was asked to live tweet from Sight Sound & Story on behalf of Blue Collar Post Collective. As part of their mission to make post events as accessible to members of our industry as possible, they often attend events like this one and provide live blogging, tweeting and recaps of the events for their members via their Facebook group. What follows are the recaps that I posted to that group after the event and massaged a bit for the sake of postPerspective.

TV is the New Black
Panelists included Kabir Akhtar, ACE, Suzy Elmiger, ACE, Julius Ramsay and moderator Michael Berenbaum, ACE.

While I haven’t made it a professional priority to break into scripted TV editing because my focus is on being a filmmaker, with editing as “just” a day job, I still love this panel, and every year it makes me reconsider that goal. This year’s was especially lively because two of the panelists, Kabir Akhtar and Julius Ramsay, have known each other from very early on in their careers and each had hilarious war stories to share.

Kabir Akhtar

The panelists were asked how they got into scripted TV editing, and if they had any advice for the audience who might want to do the same. One thing they all agreed on is that a good editor is a good editor. They said having experience in the exact same genre is less important than understanding how to interpret the style and tone of a show correctly. They also all agreed that people who hire editors often don’t get that. There is a real danger of being pigeonholed in our industry. If you start out editing a lot of reality TV and want to crossover to scripted you’ll almost definitely have to take a steep pay cut and start lower down on the ladder. There is still the problem in the industry of people assuming if you’ve cut comedy but not drama, you can’t cut drama. The same can be said for film versus TV and half-hour versus hour, etc. They all emphasized the importance of figuring out what kind of work you want to do, and pursuing that. Don’t just rush headlong into all kinds of work. Find as much focus as you can. Akhtar said, “You’re better off at the bottom of a ladder you want to climb than high up on one that doesn’t interest you.”

They all also said to seek out the people doing the kind of work you want to do, because those are the people who can help you. Ramsay said the most important networking tool is a membership to IMDB Pro. This gives you contact information for people you might want to find. He said the first time someone contacts him unsolicited he will probably ignore it, but if they contact him more than once, and it’s obvious that it’s a real attempt at personal contact with him, he will most likely agree to meet with that person.

Next they discussed the skills needed to be a successful editor. They agreed that while being a fast editor with strong technical knowledge of the tools isn’t by itself enough to be a successful editor, it is an important part of being one. If you have people in the room with you, the faster and more dexterously you can do what they are asking, the better the process will be for everyone.

There was agreement that, for the most part, they don’t look at things like script notes and circle takes. As an editor, you aren’t hired just for your technical skills, but for your point of view. Use it. Don’t let someone decide for you what the good takes are. You have to look at all of the footage and decide for yourself. They said what can feel like a great take on the set may not be a great take in the context of the cut. However, it is important to understand why something was a circle take for the director. That may be an important aspect of the scene that needs to be included, even if it isn’t on that take.

The panel also spoke about the importance of sound. They’ve all met editors who aren’t as skilled at hearing and creating good sound. That can be the difference between a passable editor and a great editor. They said that a great assistant editor needs to be able to do at least some decent sound mixing, since most producers expect even first cuts to sound good, and that task is often given to the assistant. They all keep collections of music and sound to use as scratch tracks as they cut. This way they don’t have to wait until the sound mix to start hearing how it will all come together.

The entire TV is the New Black panel.

All agreed that the best assistant editors are those who are hungry and want to work. Having a strong artistic sense and drive are more important to them than specific credits or experience. They want someone they know will help them make the show the best. In return, they have all given assistants opportunities that have led to them rising to editor positions.

When talking about changes and notes, they discussed needing that flexibility to show other options, even if you really believe in the choices you’ve made. But they all agreed the best feeling was when you’ve been asked to show other things, and in the long run, the producer or director comes back to what you had in the first place. They said when people give notes, they are pointing out the problems. Be very wary when they start telling you the solutions or how to fix the problems.

Check out the entire panel here. The TV panel begins at about 20:00.

Inside the Cutting Room
This panel focused on editor Dylan Tichenor, ACE, and was moderated by Bobbie O’Steen .

Of all of the Sight Sound & Story panels, this is by far the hardest to summarize effectively. Bobbie O’Steen is a film historian. Her preparation for interviews like this is incredibly deep and detailed. Her subject is always someone with an impressive list of credits. Dylan Tichenor has been Paul Thomas Anderson’s editor for most of his films. He has also edited such films as Brokeback Mountain, The Royal Tenenbaums and Zero Dark Thirty.

With that in mind, I will share some of the observations I wrote down while listening raptly to what was said. From the first moment, we got a great story. Tichenor’s grandfather worked as a film projector salesman. He described the first time he became aware of the concept of editing. When he was nine years old, he unspooled a film reel from an Orson Welles movie that his grandfather had left at the house and looked carefully at all of the frames. He noticed that between a frame of a wide shot and a frame of a close-up, there was a black line. And that was his first understanding of film having “cuts.” He also described an early love for classic films because of those reels his grandfather kept around, especially Murnau’s Nosferatu.

Much of what was discussed was his longtime collaboration with P.T. Anderson. In discussing Anderson’s influences, they described the blend of Martin Scorsese’s long tracking shots with Robert Altman’s complex tapestry of ensemble casts. Through his editing work on those films, Tichenor saw how Anderson wove those two things together. The greatest challenges were combining those long takes with coverage, and answering the question, “Whose story are we telling?” To illustrate this, he showed the party scene in Boogie Nights in which Scotty first meets Dirk Diggler.

Dylan Tichenor and Bobbi O’Steen.

For those complex tapestries of characters, there are frequent transitions from one person’s storyline to another’s. Tichenor said it’s important to transition with the heart and not just the head. You have to find the emotional resonance that connects those storylines.

He echoed the sentiment from one of the other panels (this will be covered in my next recap) about not simply using the director’s circle takes. He agreed with the importance of understanding what they were and what the director saw in them on set, but in the cut, it was important to include that important element, not necessarily to use that specific take.

O’Steen brought up the frequent criticism of Magnolia — that the film is too long. While Tichenor agreed that it was a valid criticism, he stood by the film as one that took chances and had something to say. More importantly, it asked something of the audience. When a movie doesn’t take chances and asks the audience to work a little, it’s like eating cotton candy. When the audience exerts effort in watching the story, that effort leads to catharsis.

In discussing The Royal Tenenbaums, they talked about the challenge of overlapping dialogue, illustrated by a scene between Gene Hackman and Danny Glover. Of course, what the director and actors want is to have freedom on the set, and let the overlapping dialogue flow. As an editor this can be a nightmare. In discussions with actors and directors, it can help to remind them that sometimes that overlapping dialogue can create situations where a take can’t be used. They can be robbed of a great performance by that overlap.

O’Steen described Wes Anderson as a mathematical editor. Tichenor agreed, and showed a clip with a montage of flashbacks from Tenenbaums. He said that Wes Anderson insisted that each shot in the montage be exactly the same duration. In editing, what Tichenor found was that those moments of breaking away from the mathematical formula, of working slightly against the best of the music, were what gave it emotional life.

Tichenor described Brokeback Mountain as the best screenplay adaptation of a short story he had ever seen. He talked about a point during the editing when they all felt it just wasn’t working, specifically Heath Ledger’s character wasn’t resonating emotionally the way he should be. Eventually they realized the problem was that Ledger’s natural warmth and affectionate nature were coming through too much in his performance. He had moments of touching someone on the arm or the shoulder, or doing something else gentle and demonstrative.

He went back through and cut out every one of those moments he could find, which he admitted meant in some cases leaving “bad” cuts in the film. To be fair, in some cases that difference was maybe half a second of action and the cuts were not as bad as he feared, but the result was that the character suddenly felt cold and isolated in a way that was necessary. Tichenor also referred back to Nosferatu and how the editing of that film had inspired him. He pointed to the scene in which Jack comes to visit Ennis; he mimicked an editing trick from that film to create a moment of rush and surprise as Ennis ran down the stairs to meet him.

Dylan Tichenor

One thing he pointed out was that it can feel more vulnerable to cut a scene with a slower pace than an action scene. In an action scene, the cuts become almost a mosaic, blending into one another in a way that helps to make each cut a bit more anonymous. In a slower scene, each cut stands out more and draws more attention.

When P.T. Anderson and Tichenor came together again to collaborate on There Will Be Blood, they approached it very differently from Boogie Nights and Magnolia. Instead of the parallel narratives of that ensemble tapestry, this was a much more focused and, often, operatic, story. They decided to approach it, in both shooting and editing, like a horror film. This meant framing shots in an almost gothic way, which allowed for building tension without frequent cutting. He showed an example of this in a clip of Daniel and his adopted son H.W. having Sunday dinner with the family to discuss buying their land.

He also talked about the need to humanize Daniel and make him more relatable and sympathetic. The best path to this was through the character of H.W. Showing how Daniel cared for the boy illuminated a different side to this otherwise potentially brutal character. He asked Anderson for additional shots of him to incorporate into scenes. This even led to additional scenes between the two being added to the story.

After talking about this film, though there were still so many more that could be discussed, the panel sadly ran out of time. One thing that was abundantly clear was that there is a reason Tichenor has worked with some of the finest filmmakers. His passion for and knowledge of film flowed through every moment of this wonderful chat. He is the editor for many films that should be considered modern classics. Undoubtedly between the depth of preparation O’Steen is known for, and the deep well of material his career provided, they could have gone on much longer without running dry of inspirational and entertaining stories to share.

Check out the entire panel here. The interview begins at about 02:17:30.

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Amy Leland is a film director and editor. Her short film, Echoes, is now available on Amazon Video. Her feature doc, Ambassador of Rhythm, is in post. She also has a feature screenplay in development and a new doc in pre-production. She is also an editor for CBS Sports Network. Find out more about Amy on her site http://amyleland.net and follow her on social media on Twitter at @amy-leland and Instagram at @la_directora.

Dell 6.15

Arcade grows with creative editor Graham Chisholm

Edit house Arcade, with offices in New York and Santa Monica, has hired creative editor Graham Chisholm. He will be based in the LA studio, but is available to work on either coast.

Chisholm’s career began in Montreal, where he worked for three years before moving to Toronto. For over a decade, he worked with a variety of advertising agencies and brands, including Gatorade, Land Rover, Budweiser, Ford, Chevrolet and the Toronto Raptors, to name a few. He has earned several awards for his work, including multiple Cannes Lions and Best in Show at the AICE Awards. According to Arcade, Chisholm has become best known for his ability to tell compelling and persuasive stories, regardless of the brand or medium he’s working with.

“Graham’s influence and dedication on a project extend beyond the edit and into the finishing of the film,” notes Michael Lawrence, director of a Powerade spot that Chisholm edited. “In our case, he is involved in everything, a true collaborator on an intellectual level, as well as a gifted craftsman. Graham has earned my trust and heartfelt praise through our time working together and becoming friends along the way. He is a gifted storyteller and a great man.”

Chisholm is in the midst of working on a new project at Arcade for Adidas via ad agency 72andSunny. He had just completed his first Arcade project, a short film called LA2024, also via 72andSunny, promoting Los Angeles’ bid for the 2024 Olympic Games.


EP Anna Rotholz joins NYC’s Spot Welders

Spot Welders, an editorial shop with offices in NYC and LA, has hired Anna Rotholz as executive producer/head of development in their NYC office. Having previously worked as a rep with Spot Welders early in her career, Rotholz brings over a decade of sales experience upon her return to the edit house. She has worked with directors, editors and designers at shops such as Believe Media, Uber Content, Imaginary Forces, Whitehouse Post, Union Editorial, Barking Owl Music, Independent Media, O Positive and Biscuit Filmworks, among numerous others.

“Anna started with Spot Welders 12 years ago in sales, when we first opened our office in New York,” notes Spot Welders managing partner David Glean. “I’m super excited to reconnect with her now as our EP/head of business development.”

The addition of Rotholz will further expand client relations and business development that enhances the editorial shop’s current pipeline of high-level projects, including notable VR and experiential pieces for the likes of The New York Times, Facebook, U2, Samsung and Bacardi.

She studied advertising and production at Hunter College, and after working for an independent rep as a full-time sales assistant, she went on to land a junior rep position at Ziegler Management, working for clients across production, post production and design. In 2009 she shifted in-house at Outside Edit + Design as head of sales, growing the slate of award-winning work out of the Soho boutique. Rotholz then landed at The Family as a senior rep, where she spent over five years. Most recently, she served as an in-house sales rep at Union Editorial before rejoining Spot Welders.


Oscar-winning editor Pietro Scalia to speak at EditFest London

Pietro Scalia, ACE, has joined the lineup for EditFest London, which takes place on June 24 at BFI Southbank. Scalia will participate in a one-on-one conversation that will cap a day of panels featuring insights from editors working in television, feature film and documentary programming.

Scalia has won two Academy Awards (Black Hawk Down, JFK), two BAFTA Awards (Gladiator, JFK), a Satellite Award (American Gangster) and three ACE Eddies (Black Hawk Down, JFK and Gladiator). For over 25 years, Scalia has worked with directors such as Ridley Scott, Oliver Stone, Bernardo Bertolucci, Gus Van Sant, Rob Marshall and Sam Raimi. His films include Good Will Hunting, Memoirs of a Geisha, Kick-Ass, The Amazing Spiderman and The Martian. His latest collaboration with director Ridley Scott is Alien: Covenant, which is in theaters now.

Scalia began his career as an assistant editor on Oliver Stone’s Wall Street and Talk Radio, then went on to contribute as an associate editor on Born on the Fourth of July and as an additional editor on The Doors. He has also co-edited documentaries, including 40 Years of Silence: An Indonesian Tragedy, The Eleventh Hour and Ashes and Snow. Scalia’s efforts also include stints as music producer with composer Hans Zimmer on three of Scott’s films.

Born in Sicily in 1960 and educated in Switzerland, Scalia came to Los Angeles to attend UCLA where he received his MFA in film and theater arts.

EditFest which was launched in LA in 2008, presents top-level film and television editors talking about their work and editing careers. The event features panels, clips and conversation, and attendees engage with panelists throughout the day. This year marks the fifth EditFest London.

Panelists at this year’s EditFest UK include (Avatar); Sylvia Landra, ACE, (Léon: The Professional); Jake Roberts, ACE, (Hell or High Water); Job ter Burg (Elle); and William Oswald (Doctor Who). ACE president Stephen Rivkin, ACE, will be moderator. As in previous years, EditFest will feature film and television panels, the one-on-one conversation (this time with Scalia), lunch and a cocktail reception.

This year, EditFest will present a special fourth panel devoted to documentary programming featuring Chris King, ACE, (Amy, Exit Through the Gift Shop); Gordon Mason, ACE, (Jimi Hendrix: Hear My Train a Comin’, Revolution: New Art for a New World); and others.


Imagine Products intros PrimeTranscoder

Imagine Products, creator of software utilities for backing up, viewing, sharing, transcoding and archiving video assets, has released PrimeTranscoder, a video transcoding app for Mac users. PrimeTranscoder offers GPU acceleration and a simple interface.

PrimeTranscoder is a transcoding application that allows users to convert multiple files to different formats at once. It recognizes and converts more than 20 different HD, 4K and RAW camera formats, including Arri, Blackmagic, Canon, GoPro, Panasonic, Red, Sony and more. While that’s happening, it can also create editable or sharable files. By doing all those things simultaneously, the company says, PrimeTranscoder makes for a more efficient workflow.

PrimeTranscoder’s user interface — which Imagine Products has designed to look more like its other applications, such as PreRoll Post for LTFS archiving and ShotPut Pro for offloading — is simple to use and offers both standard and user-defined presets. PrimeTranscoder includes standard presets for ProRes 4444, H.264, PreRoll Post, ProRes 422, iPhone, and iPad. Users simply select the preset, drop the media into Prime, and hit start.

Meanwhile, users can define and save their own preset features, such as watermarking, color correction and burnt-in timecode, along with features for merging clips. It’s also possible to include audio in transcodes regardless of the source. Users can create watch folders with automatic transcoding ability, which makes it possible to offload camera cards via ShotPut Pro, transcode the files, and send them to the editor in one seamless workflow — all while Prime creates informational logs of output activities.

PrimeTranscoder is especially helpful for creating sharable H.264 clips with customers or creating edit-ready ProRes 4444 and ProRes 422 files for an editing system. The PreRoll Post preset makes it easy to create proxies in preparation for LTFS archiving to LTO tapes. PrimeTranscoder can also communicate with, and be used by, external applications.

PrimeTranscoder is available for immediate download. The cost is $699.

 


Behind the Title: Edit 1 creative director/editor Ken Kresge

NAME: Ken Kresge

COMPANY: New York City’s Edit 1

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
We are a production company with a unique talent for previs and content work.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
VP creative director/editor

Edit 1

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
At heart, I’m an editor. I have been so for the past 20 years. Editing led to a natural progression into being a CD. I manage the creative expectation of our clients and make sure our team of pros executes it in the manner that I feel represents the client’s needs.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
In today’s business environment, being an editor means more than editing video, offline color correct and light After Effects work. Now the job includes all that plus a myriad other things, ranging from collaborating concept and script to audio, online color correct, graphic design, 3D animation and even helping with PR and social media. Fortunately, I love doing all those things, so for me now is a great time to be a creative editor.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
Working with my new colleagues. It’s been 17 years since I was the new guy, and for me its very exciting getting to know them and seeing their talent for the first time. Oh yeah, the pizza on Friday is pretty awesome.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
Give me some time and I am sure I will find something.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE TIME OF THE DAY?
I like the mornings, when its just one or two of us. I put on some music and get ready for whatever is coming up.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
I would be a scientist or a host for a comedic documentary TV show. Yes, that is pretty specific for me.

WHY DID YOU CHOOSE THIS PROFESSION?
I used editing as a way of expressing myself. I started my first editing gig at McCann Erickson.

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
Is it ok if that hasn’t happened yet?

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
I just joined Edit 1 so much of it is still going on, but I can say I was able to re-connect with some of my previous clients and friends on a few projects from McCann, Evoke, DDB, One World Trade and Grey. They have kept me quite busy over the past four weeks.

Edit 1’s rooftop.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
One World is project I am proud of for a few reasons. I helped on the agency pitch and then helped create this interactive AR project for iPad, which involved editing almost 50 different videos about places in New York City. Moreover, I am a New Yorker, and having lived here through 9/11, this project gave me an overwhelming sense of pride. For me it’s like patriotism, in a New York-er way. I’m also proud of a personal project called “Road Trip Earth.”

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
A powerful laptop, Adobe’s Creative Cloud and a decent camera/phone.

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
Honestly, I don’t follow anything.

DO YOU LISTEN TO MUSIC WHILE YOU WORK?
I listen to KEXP almost every day. I love John in the Morning. Other than that, lately, it’s a lot of ALT-J, Modest Mouse and the new Slowdive.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
I just don’t sweat it anymore. Life can be pretty hard but I have a good one, with an amazing wife and kids to share it with. I try not to mess with those things and everything else seems to fall into place.


Post producer Tony Rucker joins Dallas-based 3008 Editorial

Post producer Tony Rucker has joined Dallas-based editorial boutique 3008. He brings over a decade of post experience including work on commercial campaigns, branded content, 3D animation and visual effects projects.

Before joining 3008, Rucker worked as a post producer at Post Asylum, Element X and Fast Cuts. Clients have included Visionworks, The Salvation Army, Atmos Energy, Mott’s and others.

This past year, owner and editor Brent Herrington assumed sole ownership of 3008. While editorial remains the company’s main focus, Herrington has expanded its editorial roster and turnkey production arm under his leadership. “As we see our clients needs evolve, we want to ensure that we too are evolving as a company to offer the talent, comprehensive services and a seamless experience,” he says.

Recent 3008 projects include work for AT&T, Chrysler, Cricket Wireless, McDonald’s, Top Golf, Snapple, Universal Orlando, Bridgestone and Frito-Lay.


WWE adds iPads, iPhones to production workflow

By Nick Mattingly

Creating TV style productions is a big operation. Lots of equipment, lots of people and lots of time. World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE) is an entertainment company and the largest professional wrestling organization in the world. Since its inception, it has amassed a global audience of over 36 million.

Each year, WWE televises over 100 events via its SmackDown, WWE Raw and Pay-Per-View events. That doesn’t include the hundreds of arena shows that the organization books in venues around the world.

“Putting this show on in one day is no small feat. Our shows begins to load-in typically around 4:00am and everything must be up and ready for production by 2:00pm,” explained Nick Smith, WWE’s director of remote IT and broadcast engineering. “We travel everything from the lighting, PA, screens, backstage sets, television production facilities, generators and satellite transmission facilities, down to catering. Everyone [on our team] knows precisely what to do and how to get it done.”

Now the WWE is experimenting with a new format for the some 300 events it hosts that are currently not captured on video. The goal? To see if using Switcher Studio with a few iPhones and iPads can achieve TV-style results. A key part of testing has been defining workflow using mobile devices while meeting WWE’s high standard of quality. One of the first requirements was moving beyond the four-camera setup. As a result, the Switcher Studio team produced a special version of Switcher that allows unlimited sources. The only limitation is network bandwidth.

Adding more cameras was an untested challenge. To help prevent bottlenecks over the local network, we lowered the resolution and bitrate on preview video feeds. We also hardwired the primary iPad used for switching using Apple dongles. Using the “Director Mode” function in Switcher Studio. WWE then triggered a recording on all devices.

For the first test using Switcher Studio, the WWE had a director and operator at the main iPad. The video from the iPad was output to an external TV monitor using Apple’s AirPlay. This workflow allowed the director to see a live video feed from all sources. They were also able to talk with the camera crew and “direct” the operator when to cut to each camera.

The WWE crew had three camera operators from their TV productions to run iPhones in and around the ring. To ensure the devices had enough power to make it through the four-hour-long event, iPhones were attached to batteries. Meanwhile, two camera operators captured wide shots of the ring. Another camera operator captured performer entrances and crowd reaction shots.

WWE setup a local WiFi network for the event to wirelessly sync cameras. The operator made edits in realtime to generate a line cut. After the event the line cut and a ISO from each angle was sent to the WWE post team in the United Kingdom.

Moving forward, we plan to make further improvements to the post workflow. This will be especially helpful for editors, using tools like Adobe Premiere or Avid Media Composer.

If future tests prove successful, WWE could use this new mobile setup to provide more content to their fans–building new revenue streams along the way.


Nick Mattingly is the CEO/co-founder of Switcher Studio. He has over 10 years of experience in video streaming, online monetization and new technologies. 

Assistant Editor’s Bootcamp coming to Burbank in June

The new Assistant Editors’ Bootcamp, founded by assistant/lead editors Noah Chamow (The Voice) and Conor Burke (America’s Got Talent), is a place for a assistant editors and aspiring assistants to learn and collaborate with one another in a low-stakes environment. The next Assistant Editors’ Bootcamp classes will be held on June 10-11, along with a Lead Assistant Editors’ class geared toward understanding troubleshooting and system performance on June 24-25. All classes, sponsored by AlphaDogs’ Editor’s Lounge, will be held at Skye Rentals in Burbank.

The classes will cover such topics as The Fundamentals of Video, Media Management, Understanding I/O and Drive Speed, Prepping Footage for Edit, What’s New in Media Composer, Understanding System Performance Bottlenecks and more. Cost is $199 for two days for the Assistant Editor class, and $299 for two days for the Lead Assistant Editor class. Space is on a first-come, first-served basis and is limited to 25 participants per course. You can register here.

A system with Media Composer 8.6 or later and an external hard drive is required to take the class (30-day Avid trial available) 8GB of system memory and Windows 7/OS X 10.9 or later are needed to run Media Composer 8.6. Computer rentals are available for as little as $54 a week from Hi-Tech Computer Rental in Burbank.

Chamow and Burke came up with the idea for Assistant Editors’ Bootcamp when they realized how challenging it is to gain any real on-the-job experience in today’s workplace. With today’s focus being primarily on doing things faster and more efficiently, it’s almost impossible to find the time to figure out why one method of doing something is faster than another. Having worked extensively in reality television and creating the “The Super Grouper,” a multi-grouping macro for Avid that is now widely used in reality post workflows, Chamow understands first-hand the landscape of the assistant editor’s world. “One of the most difficult things about working in the entertainment industry, especially in a technical position, is that there is never time to learn,” he says. “I’m very passionate about education and hope by hosting these classes, I can help other assistants hone their skills as well as helping those who are new to the business get the experience they need.”

Having worked as both an assistant editor and lead assistant editor, Burke has created workflows and overseen post for up to 10 projects at a time, before moving into his current position at NBC’s America’s Got Talent. “In my years of experience and working on grueling deadlines, I completely understand how difficult the job of an assistant editor can be, having little or no time to learn anything other than what’s right in front of you,” he says. “In teaching this class, I hope to make peers feel more confident and have a better understanding in their work, taking them to the next level in their careers.”

Main Image (L-R): Noah Chamow and Conor Burke.