Category Archives: Color Grading

Creating the look for Netflix’s The End of the F***ing World

By Adrian Pennington

Content in 8K UHD won’t be transmitting or streaming its way to a screen anytime soon, but the ultra-high-resolution format is already making its mark in production and post. Remarkably, it is high-end TV drama, rather than feature films, that is leading the way. The End of The F***ing World is the latest series to pioneer a workflow that gives its filmmakers a creative edge.

Adapted from the award-winning graphic novels of Charles Forsman, the dark comedy is an eight-part co-production between Netflix and UK broadcaster Channel 4. The series invites viewers into the confused lives of teen outsiders James (Alex Lawther) and Alyssa (Jessica Barden), as they decide to escape from their families and embark on a road trip to find Alyssa’s estranged father.

Executive producer and director Jonathan Entwistle and cinematographer Justin Brown were looking for something special stylistically to bring the chilling yet humorous tale to life. With Netflix specifying a 4K deliverable, the first critical choice was to use 8K as the dominant format. Brown selected the Red Weapon 8K S35 with the Helium sensor.

In parallel, the filmmakers turned to colorist Toby Tomkins, co-founder of East London grading and finishing boutique studio Cheat, to devise a look and a workflow that would maximize the rich, detailed color, as well as the light information from the Red rushes.

“I’ve worked with Justin for about 10 years, since film school,” explains Tomkins. “Four years ago he shot the pilot for The End of The F***ing World with Jon, which is how I first became involved with the show. Because we’d worked together for so long, I kind of already knew what type of thing they were looking for. Justin shot tests on the Red Weapon, and our first job was to create a 3D LUT for the on-set team to refer to throughout shooting.”

Expert at grading commercials, and with feature-length narrative Sixteen (also shot by Justin Brown) under his belt, this was Tomkins’ first responsibility for an episodic TV drama, and he relished the challenge. “From the beginning, we knew we wanted to work completely RAW at 7K/8K the whole way through and final output at 4K,” he explains. “We conformed to the R3D rushes, which were stored on our SSD NAS. This delivered 10Gbps bandwidth to the suite.”

With just 10 days to grade all the episodes, Tomkins needed to develop a rich “Americana” look that would not only complement the dark narrative but would also work across a range of locations and timescales.

“Our references were films such as No Country for Old Men and Revolutionary Road (both lensed by Roger Deakins, BSC, ASC), which have richness and denseness to them, with skin tones almost a leathery red, adding some warmth to the characters,” he says. “Despite being shot at British locations — with British weather — we wanted to emulate something filmic and American in style. To do this we wanted quite a dense film print look, using skin tones you would find on celluloid film and a shadow and highlight roll-off that you would find in films, as opposed to British TV.”

Cheat used its proprietary film emulation to create the look. With virtually the whole series shot in 8K, the Cheat team invested in a Quad GPU Linux Resolve workstation, with dual Xeon processors, to handle the additional processing requirements once in the DaVinci Resolve finishing suite.

“The creative benefits of working in 8K from the Red RAW images are huge,” says Tomkins. “The workstation gave us the ability to use post-shoot exposure and color temperature settings to photorealistically adjust and match shots and, consequently, more freedom to focus on the finer details of the grade.

“At 8K the noise was so fine in size that we could push the image further. It also let us get cleaner keys due to the over-sample, better tracking, and access to high-frequency detail that we could choose to change or adapt as necessary for texture.”

Cheat had to conform more than 50 days of rushes and 100TBs of 7K and 8K RAW material spread across 40 drives, a process that was completed by Cheat junior colorist Caroline Morin in Resolve.

“After the first episode, the series becomes a road movie, so almost each new scene is a new location and lighting setup,” Tomkins explains. “I tried to approach each episode as though it was its own short film and to establish a range of material and emotion for each scene and character, while also trying to maintain a consistent look that flowed throughout the series.”

Tomkins primarily adjusted the RAW settings of the material in Resolve and used lift, gamma and gain to adjust the look depending on the lighting ratios and mood of the scenes. “It’s very easy to talk about workflow, tools and approach, but the real magic comes from creative discussions and experimentation with the director and cinematographer. This process was especially wonderful on this show because we had all worked together several times before and had developed a short hand for our creative discussion.

“The boundaries are changing,” he adds. “The creative looks that you get to work and play with are so much stronger on television now than they ever used to be.”

NAB 2018: A closer look at Firefly Cinema’s suite of products

By Molly Hill

Firefly Cinema, a French company that produces a full set of post production tools, premiered Version 7 of its products at NAB 2018. I visited with co-founder Philippe Reinaudo and head of business development Morgan Angove at the Flanders Scientific booth. They were knowledgeable and friendly, and they helped me to better understand their software.

Firefly’s suite includes FirePlay, FireDay, FirePost and the brand-new FireVision. All the products share the same database and Éclair color management, making for a smooth and complete workflow. However, Reinaudo says their programs were designed with specific UI/UXs to better support each product’s purpose.

Here is how they break down:
FirePlay: This is an on-set media player that supports most any format or file. The player is free to use, but there’s a paid option to include live color grading.

FireDay: Firefly Cinema’s dailies software includes a render tree for multiple versions and supports parallel processing.

FirePost: This is Firefly Cinema’s proprietary color grading software. One of its features was a set of “digital filters,” which were effects with adjustable parameters (not just pre-set LUTs). I was also excited to see the inclusion of curve controls similar to Adobe Lightroom’s Vibrance setting, which increases the saturation of just the more muted colors.

FireVision: This new product is a cloud-based review platform, with smooth integration into FirePost. Not only do tags and comments automatically move between FirePost and FireVision, but if you make a grading change in the former and hit render, the version in FireVision automatically updates. While other products such as Frame.io have this feature, Firefly Cinema offers all of these in the same package. The process was simple and impressive.

One of the downsides of their software package is its lack of support for HDR, but Raynaud says that’s a work in progress. I believe this will likely begin with ÉclairColor HDR, as Reinaudo and his co-founder Luc Geunard are both former Éclair employees. It’s also interesting that they have products for every step after shooting except audio and editing, but perhaps given the popularity of Avid Media Composer, Adobe Premiere and Avid Pro Tools, those are less of a priority for a young company.

Overall, their set of products was professional, comprehensive and smooth to operate, and I look forward to seeing what comes next for Firefly Cinema.


Molly Hill is a motion picture scientist and color nerd, soon-to-be based out of San Francisco. You can follow her on Twitter @mollymh4.

Cinna 4.13

Efilm adds veteran colorist Skip Kimball

Skip Kimball has joined Efilm as senior colorist. Kimball brings more than 30 years of experience to this post house, spanning features, television, music videos and commercials.

He recently finished work on seasons 1 and 2 of the Netflix’s Stranger Things for executive producer Shawn Levy, and is currently working on Deadpool 2 for Fox and director David Leitch. Other feature credits for Kimball include Downsizing and Nebraska for Alexander Payne; Logan for Fox and James Mangold and the Terminator 2 remaster for James Cameron and Lightstorm.

Kimball joins Deluxe’s Efilm from Technicolor, where he spent nearly six years as senior colorist. His previous experience also includes over 15 years at Modern VideoFilm where he worked on dozens of projects, including Gone Baby Gone, Tropic Thunder and James Cameron’s 3D epic Avatar. He began his career at Anderson Video, where he first learned his craft on 35mm film.

Kimball joins current Efilm colorists Natasha Leonnet, Mitch Paulson, Tom Reiser, Jason Hanel, Kevin O’Connor, Steve Delman, Adrian DeLude, Ben Estrada and Matt Wallach.


NAB: Adobe’s spring updates for Creative Cloud

By Brady Betzel

Adobe has had a tradition of releasing Creative Cloud updates prior to NAB, and this year is no different. The company has been focused on improving existing workflows and adding new features, some based on Adobe’s Sensei technology, as well as improved VR enhancements.

In this release, Adobe has announced a handful of Premiere Pro CC updates. While I personally don’t think that they are game changing, many users will appreciate the direction Adobe is going. If you are color correcting, Adobe has added the Shot Match function that allows you to match color between two shots. Powered by Adobe’s Sensei technology, Shot Match analyzes one image and tries to apply the same look to another image. Included in this update is the long-requested split screen to compare before and after color corrections.

Motion graphic templates have been improved with new adjustments like 2D position, rotation and scale. Automatic audio ducking has been included in this release as well. You can find this feature in the Essential Sound panel, and once applied it will essentially dip the music in your scene based on dialogue waveforms that you identify.

Still inside of Adobe Premiere Pro CC, but also applicable in After Effects, is Adobe’s enhanced Immersive Environment. This update is for people who use VR headsets to edit and or process VFX. Team Project workflows have been updated with better version tracking and indicators of who is using bins and sequences in realtime.

New Timecode Panel
Overall, while these updates are helpful, none are barn burners, the thing that does have me excited is the new Timecode Panel — it’s the biggest new update to the Premiere Pro CC app. For years now, editors have been clamoring for more than just one timecode view. You can view sequence timecodes, source media timecodes from the clips on the different video layers in your timeline, and you can even view the same sequence timecode in a different frame rate (great for editing those 23.98 shows to a 29.97/59.94 clock!). And one of my unexpected favorites is the clip name in the timecode window.

I was testing this feature in a pre-release version of Premiere Pro, and it was a little wonky. First, I couldn’t dock the timecode window. While I could add lines and access the different menus, my changes wouldn’t apply to the row I had selected. In addition, I could only right click and try to change the first row of contents, but it would choose a random row to change. I am assuming the final release has this all fixed. If it the wonkiness gets flushed out, this is a phenomenal (and necessary) addition to Premiere Pro.

Codecs, Master Property, Puppet Tool, more
There have been some compatible codec updates, specifically Raw Sony X-OCN (Venice), Canon Cinema Raw Light (C200) and Red IPP2.

After Effects CC has also been updated with Master Property controls. Adobe said it best during their announcement: “Add layer properties, such as position, color or text, in the Essential Graphics panel and control them in the parent composition’s timeline. Use Master Property to push individual values to all versions of the composition or pull selected changes back to the master.”

The Puppet Tool has been given some love with a new Advanced Puppet Engine, giving access to improving mesh and starch workflows to animate static objects. Beyond updates to Add Grain, Remove Grain and Match Grain effects, making them multi-threaded, enhanced disk caching and project management improvements have been added.

My favorite update for After Effects CC is the addition of data-driven graphics. You can drop a CSV or JSON data file and pick-whip data to layer properties to control them. In addition, you can drag and drop data right onto your comp to use the actual numerical value. Data-driven graphics is a definite game changer for After Effects.

Audition
While Adobe Audition is an audio mixing application, it has some updates that will directly help anyone looking to mix their edit in Audition. In the past, to get audio to a mixing program like Audition, Pro Tools or Fairlight you would have to export an AAF (or if you are old like me possibly an OMF). In the latest Audition update you can simply open your Premiere Pro projects directly into Audition, re-link video and audio and begin mixing.

I asked Adobe whether you could go back and forth between Audition and Premiere, but it seems like it is a one-way trip. They must be expecting you to export individual audio stems once done in Audition for final output. In the future, I would love to see back and forth capabilities between apps like Premiere Pro and Audition, much like the Fairlight tab in Blackmagic’s Resolve. There are some other updates like larger tracks and under-the-hood updates which you can find more info about on: https://theblog.adobe.com/creative-cloud/.

Adobe Character Animator has some cool updates like overall character building updates, but I am not too involved with Character Animator so you should definitely read about things like the Trigger Improvements on their blog.

Summing Up
In the end, it is great to see Adobe moving forward on updates to its Creative Cloud video offerings. Data-driven animation inside of After Effects is a game-changer. Shot color matching in Premiere Pro is a nice step toward a professional color correction application. Importing Premiere Pro projects directly into Audition is definitely a workflow improvement.

I do have a wishlist though: I would love for Premiere Pro to concentrate on tried-and-true solutions before adding fancy updates like audio ducking. For example, I often hear people complain about how hard it is to export a QuickTime out of Premiere with either stereo or mono/discrete tracks. You need to set up the sequence correctly from the jump, adjust the pan on the tracks, as well as adjust the audio settings and export settings. Doesn’t sound streamlined to me.

In addition, while shot color matching is great, let’s get an Adobe SpeedGrade-style view tab into Premiere Pro so it works like a professional color correction app… maybe Lumetri Pro? I know if the color correction setup was improved I would be way more apt to stay inside of Premiere Pro to finish something instead of going to an app like Resolve.

Finally, consolidating and transcoding used clips with handles is hit or miss inside of Premiere Pro. Can we get a rock-solid consolidate and transcode feature inside of Premiere Pro? Regardless of some of the few negatives, Premiere Pro is an industry staple and it works very well.

Check out Adobe’s NAB 2018 update video playlist for details on each and every update.


Brady Betzel is an Emmy-nominated online editor at Margarita Mix in Hollywood, working on Life Below Zero and Cutthroat Kitchen. You can email Brady at bradybetzel@gmail.com. Follow him on Twitter @allbetzroff.


B&H expands its NAB footprint to target multiple workflows

By Randi Altman

In a short time, many in our industry will be making the pilgrimage to Las Vegas for NAB. They will come (if they are smart) with their comfy shoes, Chapstick and the NAB Show app and plot a course for the most efficient way to see all they need to see.

NAB is a big show that spans a large footprint, and typically companies showing their wares need to pick a hall — Central, South Lower, South Upper or North. This year, however, The Studio-B&H made some pros’ lives a bit easier by adding a booth in South Lower in addition to their usual presence in Central Hall.

B&H’s business and services have grown, so it made perfect sense to Michel Suissa, managing director at The Studio-B&H, to grow their NAB presence to include many of the digital workflows the company has been servicing.

We reached out to Suissa to find out more.

This year B&H and its Studio division are in the South Lower. Why was it important for you guys to have a presence in both the Central and South Halls this year?
The Central Hall has been our home for a long time and it remains our home with our largest footprint, but we felt we needed to have a presence in South Hall as well.

Production and post workflows merge and converge constantly and we need to be knowledgeable in both. The simple fact is that we serve all segments of our industry, not just image acquisition and camera equipment. Our presence in image and data centric workflows has grown leaps and bounds.

This world is a familiar one for you personally.
That’s true. The post and VFX worlds are very dear to me. I was an editor, Flame artist and colorist for 25 years. This background certainly plays a role in expanding our reach and services to these communities. The Studio-B&H team is part of a company-wide effort to grow our presence in these markets. From a business standpoint, the South Hall attendees are also our customers, and we needed to show we are here to assist and support them.

What kind of workflows should people expect to see at both your NAB locations?
At the South Hall, we will show a whole range of solutions to show the breadth and diversity of what we have to offer. That includes VR post workflow, color grading, animation and VFX, editing and high-performance Flash storage.

In addition to the new booth in South Hall, we have two in Central. One is for B&H’s main product offerings, including our camera shootout, which is a pillar of our NAB presence.

This Studio-B&H booth features a digital cinema and broadcast acquisition technology showcase, including hybrid SDI/IP switching, 4K studio cameras, a gyro-stabilized camera car, the most recent full-frame cinema cameras, and our lightweight cable cam, the DynamiCam.

Our other Central Hall location is where our corporate team can discuss all business opportunities with new and existing B2B customers

How has The Studio-B&H changed along with the industry over the past year or two?
We have changed quite a bit. With our services and tools, we have re-invented our image from equipment providers to solution providers.

Our services now range from system design to installation and deployment. One of the more notable recent examples is our recent collaboration with HBO Sports on World Championship Boxing. The Studio-B&H team was instrumental in deploying our DynamiCam system to cover several live fights in different venues and integrating with NEP’s mobile production team. This is part of an entirely new type of service —  something the company had never offered its customers before. It is a true game-changer for our presence in the media and entertainment industry.

What do you expect the “big thing” to be at NAB this year?
That’s hard to say. Markets are in transition with a number of new technology advancements: machine learning and AI, cloud-based environments, momentum for the IP transition, AR/VR, etc.

On the acquisition side, full frame/large sensor cameras have captured a lot of attention. And, of course, HDR will be everywhere. It’s almost not a novelty anymore. If you’re not taking advantage of HDR, you are living in the past.


Color plays key role in Ava DuVernay’s A Wrinkle in Time

Color itself plays a significant role in the fantasy feature A Wrinkle in Time. To help get the look she wanted, director Ava DuVernay chose Mitch Paulson of Hollywood’s Efilm to handle final color grading — the two worked together on the Oscar-nominated film Selma. Wrinkle, which was shot by Tobias Schliessler, captures the magical feel of lead character Meg’s (Storm Reid) journey through time and space.

The film has several different looks. The rather gloomy appearance of the Meg’s difficult life on earth is contrasted by the incredibly vibrant appearance of the far-off planets she’s taken to by a trio of magical women — played by Oprah Winfrey, Reese Witherspoon and Mindy Kaling.

Paulson recalls DuVernay’s thinking. “Ava talked a bit about The Wizard of Oz, where the early scenes are in black and white and then it goes into color. She didn’t want to take things that far but that informed the overall approach. The parts on Earth at the beginning are somewhat desaturated and depressed looking. Meg lives with her mom because her dad has mysteriously disappeared. She has issues at school and is constantly bullied.”

To fine-tune this idea, Paulson built curves inside of Autodesk Lustre 2017. These were designed to desaturate many colors, particularly blues and greens, without significantly altering skin tones. Then he went through shot-by-shot to refine this even further using Lustre’s Diamond Keyer function to isolate certain colors (such as the blue in a row of school lockers) and further pull out some saturation. “I keyed almost everything,” he says, “grass, skies, water. I’d have at least three to four keys per shot.”

Then, as Meg and friends travel to the other planets, Paulson says, “We did the opposite and used curves and keying to make things brighter and more saturated. As soon as they jump to the first planet, you feel the difference.” He also points out that the time travelers find themselves in a large grassy field — a scene for which he isolated the real green of the New Zealand location and brought the saturation beyond anything we’d be used to seeing in real life.

“By manipulating the chrominance softness and tolerance diamonds of the keyer, you can quickly and easily isolate the color for a key. I find it more effective than an HSL tracker,” he explains. The colorist also finds system’s shapes tool to be very effective. “I use it all the time to isolate a portion of an actor’s face or hair to create a subtle idea of light there that sometimes really help as a final step to making a VFX shot blend perfectly with the background.”

Not all the planets the characters travel to are happy places, and Paulson worked with the filmmakers to create some variations on the color themes. The planet, Camazotz is an evil place, he says. “That’s not obvious at first but we sort of queue it right away by making it look just a bit off. For example, we took almost all the green out of the plants.”

Besides the standard d-cinema version, Paulson also did trim passes for Dolby Cinema 2D, Dolby Cinema 3D (14 foot-lamberts) and standard 3D (3.5 foot-lamberts), each of which requires additional refinement. “Tobias likes the really deep blacks you can get in the Dolby Cinema version, but we didn’t want to push things too far. It’s already so colorful and saturated that when we’d open the files in PQ (Dolby’s Perceptual Quantizer) we pulled a lot of it back so that it has an extra pop, but it still is very similar to the way the P3 version looks.”

Dailies were colored at Efilm by Adrian DeLude on Colorfront OSD. Files were conformed in Autodesk Flame. Deluxe’s Portal service was the tool used by VFX vendors to locate and download camera-original material and upload iterations of shots, which were then integrated onto Paulson’s Lustre timeline as the final grade proceeded.


MPC DI colorist Jean-Clément Soret adds Technicolor London role

Technicolor London has grown with the addition of colorist Jean-Clément Soret to its DI team. He will take on the role of supervising DI colorist, which is a new role in addition to his current duties at MPC as global creative director of color grading, where he will continue his contribution to advertising campaigns. Soret’s tool of choice is FilmLight Baselight.

Soret is already well known as a DI colorist in the industry, having worked on on films such as 28 Days Later, Hard Candy, The Twilight Saga: Eclipse, Trainspotting 2, In the Heart of the Sea and Steve Jobs. TV series work includes Babylon, Midnight Sun and Black Mirror.

“I’m looking forward to forging new relationships with filmmakers and to continue working with both colorist teams at Technicolor and MPC, as I continue working on both long-form and advertising projects,” says Soret.


Video: Red Sparrow colorist David Hussey talks workflow

After film school, and working as an assistant editor, David Hussey found himself drawn to color grading. He then became an assistant to a colorist and his path was set.

In a recent video interview with the now senior colorist at LA’s Company 3, Hussey talks about the differences of coloring a short-form project versus a long-form film and walks us through his workflow on Red Sparrow, which stars Jennifer Lawrence as a Russian ballerina-turned-spy.

Please watch…


Light Iron opens in Atlanta, targets local film community

In order to support the thriving Georgia production community, post studio Light Iron has opened a new facility in Atlanta. The expansion is the fourth since Panavision acquired Light Iron in 2015, bringing Light Iron’s US locations to six total, including Los Angeles, New York, New Orleans, Albuquerque and Chicago.

“Light Iron has been supporting Georgia productions for years through our mobile dailies services,” explains CFO Peter Cioni. “Now with a team on the ground, productions can take advantage of our facility-based dailies with talent that brings the finishing perspective into the process.”

Clark Cofer

The company’s Atlanta staff recently provided dailies services to season one of Kevin (Probably) Saves the World, season three of Greenleaf and the features Uncle Drew and Superfly.

With a calibrated theater, the Light Iron Atlanta facility has hosted virtual DI sessions from its LA facility for cinematographers working in Atlanta. The theater is also available for projecting camera and lens tests, as well as private screenings for up to 45 guests.

The theater is outfitted with a TVIPS Nevion TBG480, which allows for a full bandwidth 2K signal from either their LA or NY facility for virtual DI sessions. For example, if a cinematographer is working another show in Atlanta, they can still connect with the colorist for the final look of their previous show.

The Light Iron Atlanta dailies team uses Colorfront Express Dailies, which is standard across their facility-based and mobile dailies services worldwide.

Cioni notes that the new location is led by director of business development Clark Cofer, a member of Atlanta’s production and post industry. “Clark brings years of local and state-wide relationships to Light Iron, and we are pleased to have him on our growing team.”

Cofer most recently represented Crawford Media Services, where he drove sales for their renowned content services to companies like Lionsgate, Fox and Marvel. He currently serves as co-president of the Georgia Production Partnership, and is on the board of directors for the DeKalb County Film and Entertainment Advisory Board.

Behind the Title: Encore Senior Colorist Bob Festa

NAME: Bob Festa

COMPANY: Encore

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
Situated in sunny Hollywood, Encore Hollywood offers file-based post services, including HDR Dolby Vision mastering, 4K workflows, near-set dailies and visual effects.

AS A COLORIST, WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
Modern color in the episodic television world means being prepared to contribute on any issue, none more important than beauty fixes. All of the contemporary color tools that we use today have handles for eye sharpening, skin softening, crow’s feet, baggage and mid-tone detail augmentation. Beauty work today can take 50% of the color session time. We help ensure that the actors look their best.

WHAT SYSTEM DO YOU WORK ON?
Primarily DaVinci Resolve and FilmLight Baselight.

Runaways

ARE YOU ASKED TO DO MORE THAN JUST COLOR ON PROJECTS?
Almost all projects are conformed or assembled before color even begins. That means all camera RAW shots are assembled on a timeline, in cut order, with transitions and effects. Beyond grading the color of a piece… things like composition, speed, and textural changes like “film grain” or softness are all routine on a daily basis.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
I never thought I’d say this, but people. Collaborating with people can be really rewarding and fun. They can really make your day. I’ve had days where 1,000 shots just seem to fly by because of the air in the room.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
People. Collaborating with people. Not everyone has a good day every day, and many times whatever attitude or phone call that enters the studio becomes my challenge for the day. Those are the days where it feels like you have been on a single shot all day long.

WHY DID YOU CHOOSE THIS PROFESSION, WHAT WAS YOUR PATH?
After realizing that online editing was not for me, supervising feature film telecine sessions made me realize that I could do this. Not only was it highly creative, but it was a black art that had limitless areas where I could contribute. Many of the tools that I used back then, Topsy, Dubner, Prism and EPR were all highly customized, and no two were alike. Romancing color out of a Rank IIIC and threading a magna tech dubber was like wrestling an alligator; it was very physical and fun. It took about six months before I developed confidence and a reasonable eye for good color.

The Last Ship

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
Yes, executive producer Michael Bay’s The Last Ship (TNT) and Marvel’s Runaways (Hulu), for which I also handle the HDR grade.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
It might not be the one I’m most proud of, but it’s one that had my jaw hit the floor in the ‘90s —Joe Pytka’s “Perrier… it’s perfect” commercial. Shot on Aaton 35mm in France, there was just something exceptional about the exposures, even in standard def. Many believe it was the light in Provence, or the quaint French villages or the quality of the water at the lab or Pytka’s genius. Whatever it was it all just worked. It’s still my guilty pleasure to this day. Ironically enough, I worked on this commercial the first time I worked at Encore Hollywood.

WHERE DO YOU FIND INSPIRATION? ART? PHOTOGRAPHY?
I have an expression: “I steal from the best.” I have been so lucky to work with the top creatives again and again. After working with so many talented people in a dark studio for so many years, it’s only natural to liberate some of these great techniques that have worked so well for others. It’s my job to recognize the opportunities to contribute some of those ideas and improvise and combine them for a given shot today.

I have an exercise that I share with young aspiring colorists where I ask them to look at a camera RAW shot and tell me what they see, and how they can contribute color wise. Invariably, they bring something from their past to their color approach. We all use our fields of experience when grading.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
Acrylic contemporary art, environmental conservancy or upright jazz bass.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
Personally, I’d say digital audio reproduction for home HiFi. German cars for the hours of driving in Los Angeles and cellphones to stay in touch with my loved ones.

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
Instagram is a great source of color and composition. Existing rules are broken there every day. Larry Bridges a famous editor and owner of Red Car editorial used to say, “Today’s mistakes are tomorrows techniques.”

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
For a guy who really loves the outdoors, working in a dark studio makes me believe I need to be outside often. Mountain biking… the fun starts when you leave your comfort zone behind.