Category Archives: Color Grading

Mozart in the Jungle

The colorful dimensions of Amazon’s Mozart in the Jungle

By Randi Altman

How do you describe Amazon’s Mozart in the Jungle? Well, in its most basic form it’s a comedy about the changing of the guard — or maestro — at the New York Philharmonic, and the musicians that make up that orchestra. When you dig deeper you get a behind-the-scenes look at the back-biting and crazy that goes on in the lives and heads of these gifted artists.

Timothy Vincent

Timothy Vincent

Based on the novel Mozart in the Jungle: Sex, Drugs, and Classical Music by oboist Blair Tindall, the series — which won the Golden Globe last year and was nominated this year — has shot in a number of locations over its three seasons, including Mexico and Italy.

Since its inception, Mozart in the Jungle has been finishing in 4K and streaming in both SDR and HDR. We recently reached out to Technicolor’s senior color timer, Timothy Vincent, who has been on the show since the pilot to find out more about the show’s color workflow.

Did Technicolor have to gear up infrastructure-wise for the show’s HDR workflow?
We were doing UHD 4K already and were just getting our HDR workflows worked out.

What is the workflow from offline to online to color?
The dailies are done in New York based on the Alexa K1S1 709 LUT. (Technicolor On-Location Services handled dailies out of Italy, and Technicolor PostWorks in New York.) After the offline and online, I get the offline reference made with the dailies so I can look at if I have a question about what was intended.

If someone was unsure about watching in HDR versus SDR, what would you tell them?
The emotional feel of both the SDR and the HDR is the same. That is always the goal in the HDR pass for Mozart. One of the experiences that is enhanced in the HDR is the depth of field and the three-dimensional quality you gain in the image. This really plays nicely with the feel in the landscapes of Italy, the stage performances where you feel more like you are in the audience, and the long streets of New York just to name a few.

Mozart in the JungleWhen I’m grading the HDR version, I’m able to retain more highlight detail than I was in the SDR pass. For someone who has not yet been able to experience HDR, I would actually recommend that they watch an episode of the show in SDR first and then in HDR so they can see the difference between them. At that point they can choose what kind of viewing experience they want. I think that Mozart looks fantastic in both versions.

What about the “look” of the show. What kind of direction where you given?
We established the look of the show based on conversations and collaboration in my bay. It has always been a filmic look with soft blacks and yellow warm tones as the main palette for the show. Then we added in a fearlessness to take the story in and out of strong shadows. We shape the look of the show to guide the viewers to exactly the story that is being told and the emotions that we want them to feel. Color has always been used as one of the storytelling tools on the show. There is a realistic beauty to the show.

What was your creative partnership like with the show’s cinematographer, Tobias Datum?
I look forward to each episode and discovering what Tobias has given me as palette and mood for each scene. For Season 3 we picked up where we left off at the end of Season 2. We had established the look and feel of the show and only had to account for a large portion of Season 3 being shot in Italy. Making sure to feel the different quality of light and feel of the warmth and beauty of Italy. We did this by playing with natural warm skin tones and the contrast of light and shadow he was creating for the different moods and locations. The same can be said for the two episodes in Mexico in Season 2. I know now what Tobias likes and can make decisions I’m confident that he will like.

Mozart in the JungleFrom a director and cinematographer’s point of view, what kind of choices does HDR open up creatively?
It depends on if they want to maintain the same feel of the SDR or if they want to create a new feel. If they choose to go in a different direction, they can accentuate the contrast and color more with HDR. You can keep more low-light detail while being dark, and you can really create a separate feel to different parts of the show… like a dream sequence or something like that.

Any workflow tricks/tips/trouble spots within the workflow or is it a well-oiled machine at this point?
I have actually changed the way I grade my shows based on the evolution of this show. My end results are the same, but I learned how to build grades that translate to HDR much easier and consistently.

Do you have a color assistant?
I have a couple of assistants that I work with who help me with prepping the show, getting proxies generated, color tracing and some color support.

What tools do you use — monitor, software, computer, scope, etc.?
I am working on Autodesk Lustre 2017 on an HP Z840, while monitoring on both a Panasonic CZ950 and a Sony X300. I work on Omnitek scopes off the downconverter to 2K. The show is shot on both Alexa XT and Alexa Mini, framing for 16×9. All finishing is done in 4K UHD for both SDR and HDR.

Anything you would like to add?
I would only say that everyone should be open to experiencing both SDR and HDR and giving themselves that opportunity to choose which they want to watch and when.

Colorist Dan Hermelin joins Roundabout Entertainment

Roundabout Entertainment, which is growing its services for picture finishing and restoration, has hired colorist Dan Hermelin. He comes to Roundabout with more than 20 years of post experience and a resume spanning features, television and restoration projects, the latter including remasters of Jerry Maguire, Men in Black and The Deep. At Roundabout, his current project is the animated series Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles for Nickelodeon.

He uses a Blackmagic DaVinci Resolve, running version 12.5, using Resolve panels. His room is equipped with the new Sony X550 55-inch OLED monitors.

Hermelin spent the past five years at Deluxe, where he worked on restoration projects for Sony Pictures, MGM, Disney and other studios, as well as animation projects for Netflix and Nickelodeon. Prior to that, he spent 17 years at Ascent Media where his work spanned from commercials and music videos to episodic television, long-form television and features.

Notable credits include Disney’s Confessions of a Teenage Drama Queen and Raising Helen and restorations of the Little Rascals and Gene Autry Westerns. He began his career with Image Transform.

G-Tech 6-15

The Mill’s color team adds long-form work to offerings

The Mill, known for its work on spots, games and music videos, is broadening its offerings to include creative digital intermediate work for feature-length indie projects. This new initiative is being led by Mill colorist and director of DI, Damien Van Der Cruyssen at The Mill’s New York studio. Van Der Cruyssen has worked on features Clown (directed by Jon Watts), Blue Caprice (directed by Alexandre Moors) and the Mick Rock documentary Shot! The Psycho-Spiritual Mantra of Rock (directed by Barney Clay).

“Our passion is for the artistic side of the DI process,” says Van Der Cruyssen. “Being able to work on both commercials and movies is wonderful for a colorist. The variety helps you approach all different kinds of work, with each one giving you new creative skills that you can apply to the other.”

And how does the work differ from spots to long-form? “In commercials, I finesse every shot and push the boundaries to create the desired emotion and have an impact,” says Van Der Cruyssen. “For features, it’s more about letting the grade develop over time and building it around the arc of the story.”

L-R: Damien Van Der Cruyssen and Dee Allen.

Dee Allen, who was promoted to global color director back in July, calls this expansion of services a natural progression. “Our team collaborates with world class directors and DPs, and this allows us to extend the collaboration into features. In New York, we are also supported by our relationship with Technicolor PostWorks, providing an end-to-end solution to clients across all aspects of DI workflow and final deliverables. Of course, we’ll continue to grow our commercial and music video work, finding creative opportunities across all media.”

DI color work will be also available at other Mill studios in the moviemaking hubs of London and Los Angeles, as well as the burgeoning industry in Chicago. Additionally, filmmakers can work from any Technicolor location across the globe, either using The Mill’s remote network or by flying the talent into, for example, Montreal, Toronto or Vancouver.

Mill Color’s latest feature work can be seen in Barry (our main image), a biopic of outgoing US President Barack Obama set during his time as a college student in New York City. Released mid-December on Netflix, the film was directed by Vikram Gandhi and colored by Van Der Cruyssen.

Mill colorists already have experience working on features. Recently, head of color in NYC Fergus McCall graded The Greasy Strangler (directed by Jim Hosking) and colorist Mikey Rossiter completed work on Burn Country (directed by Ian Olds). In Chicago, head of color Luke Morrison graded Among Wolves (directed by Shawn Convey). In London, colorist Mick Vincent has done work for leading long-form TV shows including Dr. Who and Merlin. The team also has a successful history working with feature directors and DPs on commercials, including Guy Ritchie, Rupert Sanders, Tom Hopper, Peter Berg and Wally Pfister.

 


Behind the Title: AlphaDogs colorist Sean Stack

NAME: Sean Stack

COMPANY: Burbank’s AlphaDogs

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
We are a post production facility focused on online finishing, including color correction and audio mixing. We also have graphic artists and complete duplication, format conversion and tape output capabilities.

AS A COLORIST, WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
Probably the most surprising thing to the layman would be how much control I can have over the image and what that means for the production.

WHAT SYSTEM DO YOU WORK ON?
Primarily, I work in DaVinci Resolve for color grading, and we have both Mac and PC systems capable of the same work. I also color correct in Avid Symphony. The choice of system is guided by the requirements of the project.

For example, if I am working on a documentary or feature I would most likely be using Resolve to re-link and conform the sequence to the camera source files for grading, allowing access to the full quality and resolution of the source file. In the event I am finishing an unscripted reality-style television series, the sequence in Avid would be upres’d to a high-resolution format (such as DNxHD175) and graded using the Avid Symphony color correction tools.

Sunset Strip

‘Sunset Strip’ is just one of many projects Sean Stack has worked on.

ARE YOU SOMETIMES ASKED TO DO MORE THAN JUST COLOR ON PROJECTS?
Nearly every project I work on has additional work other than color correction. It ranges — some are simple edit tasks that are required to create delivery files, such as adding the final audio mix stems and exporting them with picture in the correct layout following the delivery specifications.

For a more complicated project I may be exporting DPX image sequences from Resolve of pre-graded scenes that will go to graphic artists for visual effects work. Then, once the VFX are complete, I will be cutting the final effect shots back into the final graded sequence. I’ve never been asked to do a hula dance and I am thankful for that, however I have been asked for my critical review of the project and that can be very tricky terrain to tread on. I always try to find something in every project that I like, because filmmakers need emotional support.

ARE YOU BEING ASKED TO DO MINOR VFX WORK TOO?
I do a ton of minor VFX work. My favorite fix is when you can just push-in to remove a problem, such as a boom mic dropping into the frame. Arguably, that instance may not be VFX but if you are talking about painting it out and I fix it, then it’s fixed. Minor perhaps, but I just saved the client major time and money. Other minor VFX work may include stabilizing shots, blurring objects and compositing several images together. A compositing example for a recent project involved adding footage inside a cell phone that was making a FaceTime call and also adding computer desktop images to laptop screens that were not powered up.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
When the clients and I get on the same wavelength and we are seeing the color working the same way. It means I get it and I can go forward with confidence, and once that trust is built the project will sail.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
Unlocking the cut. Do everything to avoid unlocking the cut once you are in color and sound mix.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
Good question. Making ice cream or maybe a landscape designer.

WHY DID YOU CHOOSE THIS PROFESSION? HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
I’ve always wanted to be part of filmmaking and spent some years acting in professional non-equity theatre before discovering editing was what really made me happy.

Tom Petty

‘Running Down a Dream’

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
The most well-known project may be the Tom Petty documentary called Running Down a Dream, directed by Peter Bogdanovich. Other projects of note would be Sunset Strip, a documentary on the history of the famous boulevard in Los Angeles.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
I would have to say a documentary called Dying to Know about Timothy Leary and Ram Das. I’m proud of the work on that film because the filmmakers set a very high bar for me to achieve, and I feel like I met the expectation, and in some cases, exceeded it. In that feature length documentary, there was nearly every possible video format used, from archival film transfers of a Congressional inquiry to standard definition video captured in the early 1980s. The director has a fantastic eye for color and the producer is a talented photographer, so the color grading was highly scrutinized by experienced people, and that pushed me into learning new solutions.

Timothy Leary

‘Dying to Know’

This was one of the few projects where every stone was turned over to get the best out of every shot — if it meant going to the Teranex to convert footage to the proper frame-rate then it was done. There was a long interview section where camera A was an analog video format, Betacam, and footage from camera B was Digi Beta, so the sources looked very different. I was able to balance the sources to look very similar and the distraction of varied formats was removed. Do average viewers notice? I have to say, subconsciously they probably do, and there’s a value added to a program when there’s no distraction from the story. Editing, color correction, VFX and even audio mix should not be something the viewer is thinking about or even aware of, so my best work probably goes completely unnoticed and that’s the best possible scenario for the audience. Enjoy the show.

WHERE DO YOU FIND INSPIRATION? ART? PHOTOGRAPHY?
I first try to find it within the project and footage I’m working on. I get on board with the story and, if the director has ideas, listen to those as well. If that still doesn’t get me involved, I might look at some clips from movies that have a similar feel to what I’m working on. Then I choose some music to listen to and usually stick with the genre through the project to keep my head in that space.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
Graphics tablet, external video scopes and fast Internet.

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
Instagram and Facebook, but really only for personal stuff. I have a LinkedIn account as well but I’m not very active. I’m not suggesting this is the wisest choice. I also have listings on IMDB, of course.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
I golf and work on restoring my vintage VW bus, then go camping or hit the beach and just relax.


TrumpLand

TrumpLand gets quick turnaround via Technicolor Postworks

Michael Moore in TrumpLand is a 73-minute film that documents a one-man show performed by Moore over two nights in October to a mostly Republican crowd at a theater in Ohio. It made its premiere just 11 days later at New York’s IFC Center.

The very short timeframe between live show and theatrical debut included a brisk five days at Technicolor PostWorks New York, where sound and picture were finalized. [Editor’s note: The following isn’t any sort of political statement. It’s just a story about a very quick post turnaround and the workflow involved. Enjoy!]

TrumplandMichael Kurihara was supervising sound editor and re-recording mixer on the project. He was provided with the live feeds from more than a dozen microphones used to record the event. “Michael had a hand-held mic and a podium mic, and there were boom mics throughout the crowd,” Kurihara recalls. “They set it up like they were recording an orchestra with mics everywhere. I was able to use those boom mics and some on stage to push sound into the surrounds to really give you the feeling that you are sitting in the theater.”

Kurihara’s main objectives, naturally, were to ensure that the dialogue was clear and that the soundtrack, which included elements from both nights, was consistent, but he also worked to capture the flavor of the event. He notes, for example, that Moore wanted to preserve the way that he used his microphone to produce comic effects. “He did a funny bit about the Clinton Foundation, and used the mic the way stand-up comics do, holding it closer or further a way to underscore the joke,” Kurihara says. “By holding the mic at different angles, he makes the sound warmer or punchier.”

Kurihara adds that the mix sessions did not follow a conventional, linear path as creative editorial was still ongoing. “That made it a particularly exciting project,” he notes. “We were never just mixing. Editorial changes continued to arrive right up to the point of print.”

Focusing on Picture
Colorist Allie Ames handled the film’s picture finishing. Similar to Kurihara, her task was to cement visual consistency while maintaining the immediacy of the live event. She worked from a conformed version of the film, supplied by the editing team.

According to Ames, “It already had a beautiful look from the way it was staged and shot, therefore, my goal was to embrace and enhance the intimacy of the location and create a consistent look that would draw the film audience into the world of the theatrical audience without distracting from Michael’s stage performance.”

Moore and his producers attended most of the sound mixing and picture grading sessions. “It was an unusual and exciting process,” says Ames. “Usually, you have weeks to finish a film, but in this case we had to get it out quickly. It was an honor to contribute to this project.”

Technicolor PostWorks has provided post services for several of Moore’s documentaries, including Where to Invade Next, which debuted earlier this year. For TrumpLand the facility created deliverables for the premiere at IFC, and subsequent theatrical and Netflix releases.

Says Moore, “Simply put, there would have been no TrumpLand movie without Technicolor PostWorks. They have a dedicated team of artists who are passionate about filmmaking, and especially about documentaries. In this instance, they went above and beyond what was asked of them to ensure we were ready in record time for our premiere — and they did so without compromising quality or creativity. I did my previous film with them a year ago and in just 14 months they were already using technology so new it made our 2015 experience feel so… 2015.”

NAB 1/17

Review: NewBlueFX’s ColorFast 2 for editors

By Brady Betzel

Basic color correction is rapidly becoming a skill that is expected of an editor, or even an assistant editor. If you have had the luxury of using a colorist and/or an online editor, you have probably seen them use apps such as Blackmagic Resolve, Avid Symphony, FilmLight’s Baselight or other color grading tools. These systems have so many levels of intricacy that without years of experience in color correction, most editors’ knowledge starts at the beginning stage.

If you are an editor looking to do basic color correction, slight secondary correction and, maybe, even a creative grade, you probably want to stay inside of your NLE, whether it’s Adobe Premiere, Apple FCPX, Avid Media Composer, Magix Vegas, or even After Effects. This is where NewBlueFX’s latest color correction and grading plug-in comes into play.

Featuring over 60 different looks (sometimes referred to as creative LUTs or preset color grades), skin tone isolation and the ability to isolate regions of an image for the video scopes to analyze, New Blue ColorFast 2 is a modest color correction app without the overwhelming toolset of a full-fledged color correction application.

The Details
ColorFast 2 costs $99 and works in apps like Vegas Pro 10+, Resolve 11+, Premiere CS6/6.5/CC, After Effects 5+, FCPX, Media Composer/Symphony 6+ and Grass Valley Edius 7 and 8. If you are using apps like Resolve you probably would only use ColorFast 2 for its preset looks since you already have access to all of the color correction tools included in the plug-in — unless you like the region isolating feature for the video scopes, something I find really intriguing.

ColorFast2 RGB Scope and the Lumetri RGB scope.

Most people reading this review will probably want to know why they should buy ColorFast 2 when Premiere Pro has a lot of these features built into their Lumetri color correction tools. To be honest, there are only a few things that ColorFast 2 has that Premiere, or other apps for that matter, don’t have: region-controlled video scopes, skin color isolating and NewBlueFX’s color presets. You should really check out NewBlueFX’s product page for ColorFast 2 to see some more examples of the color presets and download a trial for yourself.

Right off the bat, I felt that stacking ColorFast 2 after the Lumetri color correction tools in the effects panel in Premiere is the proper order of operations. If you are familiar with LUTs and how the chain of command works, you probably have experimented with color correcting before and after the LUT is applied.

Typically, a LUT gives the colorist a good starting point to grade from, but these days you may see creative LUTs. If the creative LUT doesn’t quite look right you will want add color correction first in the chain of command and then the LUT. This is how I would work with ColorFast 2 and Lumetri color correction tools. You will be correcting the footage to work with your creative LUT instead of correcting the LUT, which most of the time will give you inadequate results. Long story short: stack your ColorFast 2 effect after Lumetri tools in the effects window and then fine-tune the Basic Correction settings with your ColorFast 2 preset to get a great color grade.

The ColorFast2 waveform with isolated scope region.

Video Scopes
I was excited to check out the video scopes inside of ColorFast 2, so I jumped to the bottom where the Region Scopes twirl-down menu is. Under that is the Video Scopes menu, which contains Vectorscope (Classic), Vectorscope (Color), Vectorscope (Sat, RGB Parade), Waveform and Histogram. The real beauty is that NewBlueFX gives you the ability to isolate a square region of your footage to be output through the video scope. This allows you to pinpoint your correction a little easier, and I really love this feature… but I also noticed that when you have both the Lumetri video scopes, as well as the ColorFast 2 scopes there is a discrepancy in values. I tended to like the Lumetri video scopes a little better. In fact, they go all the way up to 100, where the ColorFast 2 scopes only go up to 80 — this could very well be a bug in the compatibility between ColorFast 2 and the new Adobe Premiere CC 2015.4.

One issue I found with the ColorFast 2 scopes was that I couldn’t move the actual scope around or have more than one on at a time. While the region selection is an awesome feature, being able to see your full image is sometimes more important, so that is why I would probably stick to the NLEs built-in scopes.

Primary, Secondary, Output Correction Menus
Going back to the top of the ColorFast 2 Effect Editor menus, up first is the Primary Correction twirl-down menu. Here you can quickly white-balance your footage with an eyedropper, even keyframe it. In addition, you can adjust the White Strength, White Tweak (fine-tune control of the white color), Hue, Saturation, Exposure, Brightness and Film Gamma. A problem I encountered was that if you do a primary color correct on your image and then choose a color preset, all of your primary work gets reset, which is a real bummer if you want to correct and then grade your footage. So, if you want to work in ColorFast 2 in a more traditional way, where you color correct then color grade, you may want to do it in two separate effects. Moreover, you may want to primary color correct inside of the Lumetri tools then stack the ColorFast 2 on top.

Secondaries menu.

Next up is the Secondary Correction twirl-down menu, which gets you into the real meat and potatoes of the plug-in. There is a helpful “Show Mask” drop down that will allow you to isolate and view Highlights, Midtones, Shadows, Skin Color Mask and a Shape Mask. Inside each of these you can adjust Tint, Saturation, overall Level, and even enable and disable this secondary if you want. Further down in the secondary menu you can adjust the High, Mid and Shadow thresholds (basically transitions from high to mid or mid to shadow), and even the blending and spread.

While still in the secondary twirl-down menu you can jump into the Skin Mask, which will quickly help you identify skin color, soften imperfections and even help keep skin color fidelity while adjusting the rest of your image.

The last menu is the Output Correction twirl-down. Here you can do a widespread correction that lands after the fine-tuning. You can adjust overall Saturation, Exposure and Brightness.

Summing Up
In the end, I think ColorFast 2 is best suited for people who want a quick color grade by applying a preset look but who also want a little ability to fine-tune that look. ColorFast 2 has some pretty good-looking presets like Vintage, Fallout, Gotham and even some black and white presets like B&W Ink. It’s even more fun to go and purposely change your white balance to something crazy, like a deep purple, for interesting grades. You should definitely try NewBlueFX’s ColorFast 2 if you are looking for some additional creative grade looks while still being able to individually tweak the output.

Brady Betzel is an Emmy-nominated online editor at Margarita Mix in Hollywood, working on Life Below Zero and Cutthroat Kitchen. You can email Brady at bradybetzel@gmail.com. Follow him on Twitter @allbetzroff.

NAB 1/17

2016 HPA Award winners

The Hollywood Professional Association (HPA) held its annual awards this week at the Skirball Cultural Center in Los Angeles. The HPA Awards recognize individuals and companies for outstanding contributions made in the creation of feature films, television, commercials, and entertainment content enjoyed around the world.

Awards were bestowed in creative craft categories honoring behind-the-scenes artistry, and a host of special awards were also presented.

The winners of the 2016 HPA Awards are:

Outstanding Color Grading – Feature Film

Carol
John Dowdell // Goldcrest Post Productions Ltd

WINNER – The Revenant
Steven J. Scott // Technicolor Production Services

Brooklyn
Asa Shoul // Molinare

The Martian
Stephen Nakamura // Company 3

The Jungle Book
Steven J. Scott // Technicolor Production Services

Outstanding Color Grading – Television

Vinyl – E.A.B
Steven Bodner // Deluxe/Encore NY

Fargo – The Myth of Sysiphus
Mark Kueper // Technicolor

Outlander – Faith
Steven Porter // MTI Film

WINNER – Gotham – By Fire
Paul Westerbeck // Encore Hollywood

Show Me A Hero – Part 1
Sam Daley // Technicolor PostWorks NY

Outstanding Color Grading – Commercial
Fallout 4The Wanderer
Siggy Ferstl / Company 3

Toyota Prius – Poncho
Sofie Borup // Company 3

NASCAR – Team
Lez Rudge // Nice Shoes

Audi R8 – Commander
Stefan Sonnenfeld // Company 3

Apple Music – History of Sound
Gregory Reese // The Mill

Pennzoil – Joyride Circuit
Dave Hussey // Company 3

WINNER – Hennessy – Odyssey
Tom Poole // Company 3

Outstanding Editing – Feature Film

The Martian
Pietro Scalia, ACE

The Big Short

The Revenant
Stephen Mirrione, ACE

WINNER – The Big Short
Hank Corwin, ACE

Sicario
Joe Walker, ACE

Spotlight
Tom McArdle, ACE

Outstanding Editing – Television (TIE)

Body Team 12
David Darg // RYOT Films

Underground – The Macon 7
Zack Arnold, Ian Tan // Sony Pictures Television

Vinyl – Pilot
David Tedeschi

martin-nicholson-ace-greg-babor-editing-for-tv-winners-at-2016-hpa-awards

Roots winners for editing, Martin Nicholson, ACE, Greg Babor

WINNER – Roots – Night One
Martin Nicholson, ACE, Greg Babor

WINNER – Game of Thrones – Battle of the Bastards
Tim Porter, ACE

Outstanding Editing – Commercial

WINNER – Wilson – Nothing Without It
Doobie White // Therapy Studios

Nespresso – Training Day
Chris Franklin // Big Sky Edit

Saucony – Be A Seeker
Lenny Mesina // Therapy Studios

Samsung – Teresa
Kristin McCasey // Therapy Studios

Outstanding Sound – Feature Film

Room
Steve Fanagan, Niall Brady, Ken Galvin // Ardmore Sound

Eye In The Sky
Craig Mann, Adam Jenkins, Bill R. Dean, Chase Keehn // Technicolor Creative Services

Batman Vs Superman: Dawn of Justice
Scott Hecker // Formosa Group
Chris Jenkins, Michael Keller // Warner Bros. Post Production Services

Zootopia
David Fluhr, CAS, Gabriel Guy, CAS, Addison Teague // Walt Disney Company

WINNER – Sicario
Alan Murray, Tom Ozanich, John Reitz // Warner Bros. Post Production Services

Outstanding Sound – Television

WINNER – Outlander – Prestonpans
Nello Torri, Alan Decker, Brian Milliken, Vince Balunas  // NBCUniversal Post Sound

Game of Thrones – Battle of the Bastards
Tim Kimmel, MPSE, Paula Fairfield, Mathew Waters, CAS, Onnalee Blank, CAS, Bradley C. Katona, Paul Bercovitch // Formosa Group

Preacher – See
Richard Yawn, Mark Linden, Tara Paul // Sony Sound

Marco Polo – One Hundred Eyes
David Paterson, Roberto Fernandez, Alexa Zimmerman, Glenfield Payne, Rachel Chancey // Harbor Picture Company

House of Cards – Chapter 45
Jeremy Molod, Ren Klyce, Nathan Nance, Scott R. Lewis, Jonathan Stevens // Skywalker Sound

Outstanding Sound – Commercial

WINNER – Sainsbury’s – ­Mog’s Christmas Calamity
Anthony Moore, Neil Johnson // Factory

Save the Children UK – Still The Most Shocking Second A Day
Jon Clarke // Factory

Wilson – Nothing Without It
Doobie White // Therapy Studios

Honda – Paper
Phil Bolland // Factory

Honda – Ignition
Anthony Moore // Factory

Outstanding Visual Effects – Feature Film

Star Wars: The Force Awakens
Jay Cooper, Yanick Dusseault, Rick Hankins, Carlos Munoz, Polly Ing // Industrial Light & Magic

WINNER – The Jungle Book
Robert Legato, Andrew R. Jones
Adam Valdez, Charley Henley // MPC
Keith Miller // Weta Digital

Captain America: Civil War
Russell Earl, Steve Rawlins, Francois Lambert, Pat Conran, Rhys Claringbull // Industrial Light & Magic

The Martian
Chris Lawrence, Neil Weatherley, Bronwyn Edwards, Dale Newton // Framestore

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Out of the Shadows
Pablo Helman, Robert Weaver, Kevin Martel, Shawn Kelly, Nelson Sepulveda // Industrial Light & Magic

Outstanding Visual Effects – Television

Supergirl – Pilot
Armen V. Kevorkian, Andranik Taranyan, Gevork Babityan, Elaina Scott, Art Sayan // Encore VFX

Ripper Street – The Strangers’ Home
Ed Bruce, Nicholas Murphy, Denny Cahill, John O’Connell // Screen Scene

Black Sails – XXI
Erik Henry // Starz
Matt Dougan // Digital Domain
Martin Ogren, Jens Tenland, Nicklas Andersson // ILP

The Flash – Guerilla Warfare
Armen V. Kevorkian, Thomas J. Conners, Andranik Taranyan, Gevork Babityan, Jason Shulman // Encore VFX

Holly Shiffman and Mike Chapman with VFX winner for Game of Thrones, Matthew Rouleau.

WINNER – Game of Thrones – Battle of the Bastards
Joe Bauer, Eric Carney // Fire & Blood Productions
Derek Spears // Rhythm & Hues 
Glenn Melenhorst // Iloura
Matthew Rouleau // Rodeo FX

Outstanding Visual Effects – Commercial

Sainsbury’s – Mog’s Christmas Calamity
Ben Cronin, Grant Walker, Rafael Camacho // Framestore

WINNER – Microsoft Xbox – Halo 5: The Hunt Begins
Ben Walsh, Ian Holland, Brian Delmonico, Brian Burke // Method

AT&T – Power of &amp
James Dick, Corrina Wilson, Euna Kho, Callum McKeveny // Framestore

Kohler – Never Too Next
Andy Boyd, Jake Montgomery, Zachary DiMaria, David Hernandez // JAMM

Gatorade – Sports Fuel
JD Yepes, Richard Shallcross // Framestore

Emerging Leader Award

2016 Winners- Jesse Korosi, Jennifer Zeidan

The following special awards, which were previously announced, were also presented this evening:

HPA Engineering Excellence Award

Sponsored by NAB Show

The HPA Engineering Excellence Award is recognized as one of the most important technology honors in the industry, spotlighting companies and individuals who draw upon technical and creative ingenuity to develop breakthrough technologies.  Submissions for this peer-judged award may include products or processes, and must represent a step forward for its industry beneficiaries.

2016 Winners 

Aspera: FASPStream

Grass Valley: GV Node Real Time IP Processing and Edge Routing Platform

RealD: Ultimate Screen

SGO: Mistika

Honorable mentions:
Grass Valley: LDX 86N Native 4K Series Camera

Canon USA, Inc.: 4K / UHD / 2K / HD display

HPA Judges Award for Creativity and Innovation

The HPA Judges Award for Creativity and Innovation recognizes companies and individuals who have demonstrated excellence, whether in the development of workflow and process to support creative storytelling or in technical innovation. The Judges Award for Creativity and Innovation is conferred by a jury of industry experts.

2016 Winner- The Mill: Blackbird

HPA Lifetime Achievement Award

The HPA Lifetime Achievement Award is given to an individual who is recognized for his or her service and commitment to the professional media content industry. The mission of the award is to give recognition to individuals who have, with great service, dedicated their careers to the betterment of the industry. The Lifetime Achievement Award is given at the discretion of the HPA Board of Directors and the HPA Awards Committee. It is not bestowed every year.

herb-dow

Herb Dow

2016 Honoree- Herb Dow, ACE

The Charles S. Swartz Award

The Charles S. Swartz Award is conferred on a person, group, or company that has made significant artistic, technological, business or educational impact across diverse aspects of the media industry. The award was named in honor of the late Charles S. Swartz, who led the Entertainment Technology Center at the University of Southern California from 2002 until 2006, building it into the industry’s premiere testing bed for new digital cinema technologies.

2016 Honoree – Michelle Munson, Founder and CEO of Aspera


Nice Shoes opens Toronto studio

A New York City post production mainstay for the past 20 years, Nice Shoes has gone international with the opening of Nice Shoes Toronto. The new studio is made up of creative directors Gary Thomas and Matt Greenwood, design director Stefan Woronko, senior colorist Roslyn Di Sisto and executive producer Kristen Van Fleet.

Prior to joining Nice Shoes, the team (who come from the now defunct post house Smith) delivered a series of vibrant animations and short films for the Cannes Lions Festival, working closely with Leo Burnett Chicago executive producer Juan Woodbury. Van Fleet and Di Sisto also graded Drake’s hit “Hotline Bling,” working with Director X on the color-driven music video.

Thomas, Greenwood and Woronko will also be added to the now-international Nice Shoes Creative Studio roster, which recently showed off the studio’s animation and virtual reality capabilities by designing and editing the opening titles of the 2016 ANA Masters of Marketing Conference.

Di Sisto joins the color and finishing team, who have delivered work for brands such as Volvo, Samsung, Jeep, McDonald’s and MasterCard as well as performers BeyoncéKanye WestLady Gaga and Pink. As executive producer, Van Fleet unites the divisions, working closely with creative studio EP Angela Bowen and color and finishing EP Tara Holmes.

“Toronto is one of the top hubs for advertising in the world, and we’ve assembled a team that reflects the high quality of creative content being produced in this market,” says managing director Justin Pandolfino.

The newly launched location will offer directors and clients in the US planning shoots in Canada a convenient and competitive production partner. Nice Shoes Toronto will be integrated with the studio’s Remote Color Grading network, creating opportunities for Di Sisto to work with clients throughout North America and for clients in Toronto to connect with the company’s full roster of colorists. Di Sisto will be working with FilmLight’s Baselight and with monitors calibrated by Nice Shoes’ team of engineers.

“Our Toronto studio not only extends our physical reach, but it expands the combined resources and talents of all locations, allowing us to be a more versatile and nimble partner to our clients,” adds Nice Shoes Creative Studio EP Bowen.

Main Photo Caption: (Back Row, L-R) Gary Thomas and Matt Greenwood. (Front, L-R) Kristen Van Fleet, Stefan Woronko, Adrian Gluvakovich and Roslyn Di Sisto.


The A-List: Bleed for This director Ben Younger

By Iain Blair

Writer/director Ben Younger had been MIA for quite a while. Back in 2000 he made a splash with his acclaimed feature debut, Boiler Room. This tense crime drama, which starred Ben Affleck and Vin Diesel, was set in the high stakes, testosterone-fueled — and sometimes illegal — world of brokerage firms and investment banking.

Five years later, he directed his second film, the Meryl Streep/Uma Thurman romantic dramedy Prime, which grossed $67 million worldwide and cemented his reputation as someone to watch. Then Younger disappeared from sight.

Director Ben Younger and writer Iain Blair.

Over a decade later, he’s back with his third film, Bleed for This, a super-intense boxing drama and the true comeback story of Vinny Pazienza, the “Pazmanian Devil” (Miles Teller), whose boxing career should have ended when a terrible head-on car smash left him with a badly broken neck and few chances of ever walking again, let alone fighting in the ring. Yet he refused to throw in the towel and staged the sport’s most unlikely comeback so he could defend his middleweight world championship.

I spoke with Younger about his disappearance from the industry, making this film and his love-hate relationship with post.

It’s been 11 years since your last film. What the hell happened?
It’s been even longer — 12 years (laughs). I wanted to make this motorcycle racing film, Isle of Man, back in ’07, but no one would make it. I got a little disenchanted, a little upset. I tried to get another movie made, couldn’t get that off the ground either. I stepped back and decided to take five, six years off and go the experiential route instead.

I learned to fly, I became a cook in Costa Rica, went surfing and raced motorbikes for a year professionally. I did all the things my dad never got a chance to do because he died so young. He hated his job, was miserable, and I didn’t want to do that.

I heard you’re not even a boxing fan, so why make this film?
It’s not a boxing film like the usual ones. It’s this incredible comeback story about this guy who had a passion for boxing. I don’t feel that passionate about anything in my life where I would risk paralysis to do it, like he did. So by that measure, it didn’t matter what Vinny did. I would have told the same story whatever his profession. That’s what drew me in.

What did you hope for the film?
Because it’s set in the world of boxing, you can’t avoid comparisons with other films in the genre, so it was important not to fall into cliché and the tired old tropes of every boxing movie. I just wanted to differentiate myself. There’s a lot of humor, which is always a big part of my movies, and I like humor in very dramatic settings.

Martin Scorsese executive produced. Did you ask him for any advice, considering he made Raging Bull?
No, and he didn’t really offer any. He got involved after he showed Boiler Room to his Wolf of Wall Street crew, and then he called me to meet up after reading this script. I was in Costa Rica, cooking, and he said, ‘You’ve got to get back here. I’m going to help you make this movie.’ And he did.

What did Miles Teller bring to the role?
Preparation. He’s a monster. Eight months of training and he knew his boxing. We shot for just 24 days, on a $6 million budget — not enough time or money — so I knew I couldn’t be on set worrying about the boxing itself, or we’d have been in big trouble. So he took all that off the table for me.

Do you like the post process?
I have a love-hate relationship with it. Every movie, inarguably, gets made in post. There’s no question. Same with my other two films. This was written in post, re-imagined in post, reconfigured in post. But there’s something I hate about sitting in a dark room for 12 hours a day. It fucking kills me. It’s a very depressing work environment. You have to do it, but it doesn’t mean you have to like it.

You edited the film with Zac Stuart-Pontier who cut Martha Marcy May Marlene and won two Emmys for HBO’s The Jinx. Tell us about that relationship and how it worked.
He was a PA on Prime, his first job in the industry. He was at NYU and took a semester off to work on the movie, and then his career took off. He wasn’t on set at all as he was still on The Jinx, so we had an assistant editor log it all and he started after the shoot.

We did it all at Harbor Post — everything. It took a good six months. The big problem was I made a mistake in the script, putting the car crash in the middle, and it didn’t work. So we had to ruthlessly cut the first half down so it happened more like a first act, and we lost a lot of stuff. It was a shock to me, but now I’m like, ‘What were you thinking?’

We did some test screenings, and people loved watching all the gambling, the women and so on, but then after the crash scene, retroactively they hated it. They were like, ‘Why take us on the hour-long detour?’ Because of The Jinx, Zac was very used to working in a docu-drama environment, and we had all this great archival footage of Vinny, and I thought maybe we would use some of it at the end credits. But we ended up putting it in the middle of the movie. We break the fourth wall so many times in the editing, and no one seems to mind. We cut from Vinny to Miles to Vinny, and it just works.

Can you talk about the importance of music and sound in the film?
It’s over half the film, and when you don’t have the budget it’s the cheapest thing you can do to radically improve your film. A good score and mix can improve it by 25 percent, easily.

Where did you mix the sound?
All at Harbor on their huge new Atmos stage, but my supervising sound editor Coll Anderson has his own studio in Woodstock where we did the pre-mixes.

This is obviously not a VFX-driven film, but I’m assuming there was some in the crash scene?
And crowd replacement stuff at the fights, some compositing. It was all done by Eyeball in LA. They did a great job on the crash, and they’d never done that sort of thing before.

How important was the DI on this, and where did you do it?
Hugely important. I worked closely with DP Larkin Seiple and colorist Andrew Francis at Sixteen19 in New York, who has an amazing eye. I think I was able to give them a fresh set of eyes after they had been at it for 10 hours. I would take a look and ask, ‘Why is this so blue? Why is this so warm?’ And they would go, ‘You’re right,’ and adjust it a little.

Did it turn out how you originally envisioned it?
From a macro perspective, definitely. It was more the little things — the crash, the archival footage — that changed.

What’s next?
No more long breaks. I’m making Isle of Man next year. It’s funded and happening.

Industry insider Iain Blair has been interviewing the biggest directors in Hollywood and around the world for years. He is a regular contributor to Variety and has written for such outlets as Reuters, The Chicago Tribune, The Los Angeles Times and the Boston Globe.

Review: The HP Z1G3 All-in-One workstation

By Brady Betzel

I’ll admit it. I’ve always been impressed with HP’s All-in-One workstations — from their z840 to their zBook mobile workstation and now their HP Z1G3. Yes, I know, the HP line of workstations are not cheap. In fact, you can save quite a bit of money building your own system, but you will probably have tons of headaches unless you are very confident in your computer-building skills. And if you don’t mind standing in the return line at the Fry’s Electronics.

HP spends tons of time and money on ISV certifications for their workstations. ISV certification stands for Independent Software Vendor certification. In plain English it means that HP spends a lot of time and money making sure the hardware inside of your workstation works with the software you use. For an industry pro that means apps like Adobe’s Premiere Pro and After Effects, Avid Media Composer, Autodesk products like 3DS Max and many others.

For this review,  I tested apps like Avid Media Composer, FilmLight’s Baselight for Media Composer color correction plug-in, Adobe Premiere Pro, Adobe Media Encoder and Adobe After Effects, as well as Blackmagic’s Resolve 12.5.2, which chewed through basic color correction. In terms of testing time, I typically keep a review computer system for a couple of months, but with this workstation I really wanted to test it as thoroughly as possible — I’ve had the workstation for three months and counting, and I’ve been running the system through all the appropriate paces.

I always love to review workstations like the HP Z1G3 because of the raw power they possess. While HP sent me one of the top-of-the-line Z1G3 configurations, which retails for a list price of $3,486, they have a pretty reasonable starting price at $1,349. From Intel i3, i5 and i7 configurations all the way up to the all mighty Intel Xeon — the HP Z1G3 can be customized to fit into your workflow whether you just need to check your email or color correct video from your GoPro.

Here are the specs that make up the HP Z1G3 All-in-One workstation I received:

● 23.6-inch UHD/4K non-glare and non-touch display (3840×2160)
● Intel Xeon E3-1270 v5 CPU, 3.6GHz (4 Cores / 8 Threads)
● 64GB DDR4 SODIMM 2133 GHz (4 x 16GB)
● Nvidia Quadro M2000M graphics (4GB)
● Two Z Turbo drives (512GB, PCIe M.2)
● Wireless keyboard and mouse
● Two Thunderbolt 3/USB 3.1 ports
● USB charging port
● Media card reader
● DisplayPort out

As I mentioned earlier, I tested the Z1G3 with many different apps, but recently I’ve been diving deeper into color correction, and luckily for my testing this fits right in. A few of the most strenuous real-world tests for computer systems is running 3D modeling apps like Maxon Cinema 4D and color correction suites like Resolve. Of course, apps like After Effects are great tests as well, but adding nodes on nodes on nodes in Resolve will really tax your CPU, as well as your GPU.

One thing that can really set apart high-end systems like the Z1G3 is the delay when using a precision color correction panel like Tangent’s Elements or Ripple. Sometimes you will move one of the color wheel balls and a half a second later the color wheel moves on screen. I tried adding a few clips and nodes on the timeline and when using the panels, I noticed no discernible delay (at least more than what I would expect). While this isn’t a scientific test, it is crucial for folks looking to plug in external devices.

For more scientific tests I stuck to apps like Cinebench from Maxon, AJA’s System Test and Blackmagic’s Disk Speed Test. In Cinebench, the Z1G3 ranked at the top of the list when compared to similar systems. In AJA’s System Test I tested the read/write speed of the hp-z1g3-aja-system-test-copynon-OS drive (basically the editing or cache drive). It sustained around 1520MB/s read and 1490MB/s write. I say around because I couldn’t get the AJA app to display the entire read/write numbers because of the high-resolution/zoom in Windows, I tried scaling it down to 1920×1080 but no luck. In Blackmagic’s Disk Speed Test, I was running at 1560MB/s read and 1497.3MB/s write. The drive that I ran this test on is HP’s version of the M.2 PCIe SSD powered by Samsung, more affectionately known by HP as a Z-Turbo drive. The only thing better at the moment would be a bunch of these drives arranged in a RAID-0 configuration. Luckily, you can do that through the Thunderbolt 3 port with some spare SSDs you have lying around.

Almost daily I ran Premiere Pro CC, Media Encoder and Resolve Studio 12.5.2. I was really happy with the performance in Premiere. When working with QuickTimes in inter-frame codecs like H.264 and AVC-HD (non-edit friendly codecs), I was able to work without too much stuttering in the timeline. When I used intra-frame codecs like ProRes HQ from a Blackmagic’s Pocket Cinema Camera, Premiere worked great. I even jumped into Adobe’s Lumetri color tools while using Tangent’s Ripple external color correction panel and it worked with little discernable delay. I did notice that Premiere had a little more delay when using the external color correction panel than Media Composer and Resolve, but that seemed to be more of a software problem rather than a workstation problem.

One of my favorite parts about using a system with an Nvidia graphics card, especially a Quadro card like the M2000M, is the ability to encode multiple versions of a file at once. Once I was done editing some timelapses in Premiere, I exported using Media Encoder. I would apply three presets I made: one square 600×600 H.264 for Instagram, one 3840×2160 H.264 for YouTube and an Animated GIF at 480×360 for Twitter. Once I told Media Encoder to encode, it ran all three exports concurrently — a really awesome feature. With the Nvidia Quadro card installed, it really sped along the export.

Media Composer
Another app I wanted to test was Media Composer 8.6.3. Overall Media Composer ran great except for the high-resolution display. As I’ve said in previous reviews, this isn’t really the fault of HP, but more of the software manufacturers who haven’t updated their interfaces to adapt to the latest UHD displays. I had filmed a little hike I took with my five-year-old. I gave him a GoPro while I had my own. Once we got the footage back home, I imported it into Media Composer, grouped the footage and edited it using the multi-cam edit workflow.

Simply put, the multi-camera split was on the left and the clip I had in the sequence was playing simultaneously on the right. Before I grouped the footage into a multi-group, I transcoded the H.264s into DNxHD 175 an intra-frame, edit-friendly codec. The transcode was nearly realtime, so it took 60 minutes to transcode a 60-minute H.264 — which is not bad. In the end, I was able to edit the two-camera multi-group at 1920×1080 resolution with only minor hiccups. Occasionally, I would get caught in fast forward for a few extra seconds when J-K-L editing, but nothing that made me want to throw my keyboard or mouse against the wall.

Once done editing, I installed the FilmLight color correction plug-in for Media Composer. I had a really awesome experience coloring using Baselight in Media Composer on the Z1G3. I didn’t have any slowdowns, and the relationship between using the color correction panel and Baselight was smooth.

Resolve
The last app I tested with HP’s Z1G3 All-in-One Workstation was Blackmagic’s Resolve 12.5.2. Much like my other tests, I concentrated on color correction with the Tangent Ripple and Element-Vs iOS app. I had four or five nodes going in the color correction page before I started to see a slow down. I was using the native H.264 and ProRes HQ files from the cameras, so I didn’t make it easy for Resolve, but it still worked. Once I added a little sharpening to my clips, the HP Z1G3 really started to kick into gear. I heard the faint hum of fans, which up until this point hadn’t kicked in. This is also where the system started to slow down and become sluggish.

Summing Up
The Z1G3 is one of my favorite workstations, period. A while ago, I reviewed the previous All-in-One workstation from HP, the Z1G2, and at the time it was my favorite. One of my few complaints was that, while it was easy to fix, it was very heavy and bulky. When I opened the Z1G3 box, I immediately noticed how much lighter and streamlined the design was. It almost felt like they took away 50 percent of the bulk, which is something I really appreciate. I can tell that one of the main focuses with the Z1G3 was minimizing its footprint and weight, while increasing the power. HP really knocked it out of the park.

One of the only things that I wish was different on the Z1G3 I tested was the graphics card. While the Nvidia Quadro M2000M is a great graphics card, it is a “mobile” version of a Quadro, which has 128 fewer CUDA cores and 26GB/s less bandwidth than its desktop equivalent the M2000. I would love the option of a full-sized Quadro and instead of the mobile version but I also understand the power consumption will go up as well as the form factor, so maybe I give HP a pass here.

In the end, I know everyone reading this review is saying to themselves, “I love my iMac so why would I want the HP Z1G3?” If you are a die-hard Apple user, or you just saw the new Microsoft Surface Studio announcement, then it might be a hard sell, but I love both Windows- and Mac OS-based systems, and the Z1G3 is awesome. What’s even more awesome is that it is easily upgradeable. I took off the back cover, and with simple switch I could have added a 2.5-inch hard drive or two in under a minute. If you are looking for a new powerful workstation and want one that not only stands up to Resolve and Premiere Pro CC, the HP Z1G3 is for you.


Brady Betzel is an online editor at Margarita Mix in Hollywood, working on Life Below Zero and Cutthroat Kitchen. You can email Brady at bradybetzel@gmail.com. Earlier this year, Brady was nominated for an Emmy for his work on Disney’s Unforgettable Christmas Celebration.