Category Archives: Color Grading

Behind the Title: Carbon’s head of color grading, Maria Carretero

NAME: Maria Carretero

COMPANY: Carbon (@carbonvfx)

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
Carbon, which has locations in New York, Chicago and LA, is a boutique design and visual effects company that focuses on art, ideas, and talent. I am based in Chicago.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Head of color grading

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
I work with clients to find color palettes and looks that best tell their story.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
I’m still surprised with how much creativity is involved in the grading process. I especially love coming to solutions through mixing art and technique.

WHAT SYSTEM DO YOU WORK ON?
Blackmagic DaVinci Resolve

ARE YOU SOMETIMES ASKED TO DO MORE THAN JUST COLOR ON PROJECTS?
Sometimes I’m involved in projects from very early on, which usually entails creating tone and color palettes to be used during filming. I’ve also contributed reference images that help the creative team settle on an overall look or color, and have been present at camera tests to check light and exposure. I love being able to use my artistic background in painting and the fine arts to give projects their maximum creative potential.

Jeep “Two Words”

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
There are moments when I’m grading a piece and I have a strange connection with it as if I’m seeing it clearly for the first time. It’s like I suddenly know it’s going to be a wonderful grade. Moments like that are magical.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE TIME OF THE DAY?
Sunset, when all the lights in the city start turning on.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
Painting.

WHY DID YOU CHOOSE THIS PROFESSION?
Color grading chose me. Before I had officially started grading, I spent a lot of my time focusing on my painting, and while grading was something I could technically excel at, my art was the priority at the time. Then digital grading started gaining momentum in Spain and I gradually realized that color grading opportunities were more and more important to me. I feel extremely lucky. I’m self-taught and relied on my incredible network of supporters to give me chances to go further and further.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
I worked on the last five Jeep commercials with a talented group of people from DDB Chicago and the great director Tobias Granström. Some other projects included a huge campaign for Panama Tourism out of VML, the hilarious Liquid Plumbr spot from FBC Chicago and the newest Machine Gun Kelly music video, directed by Steven Caple Jr., which has more than four million views on YouTube.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
I’m proud of a lot of my recent work, but Recalculating for Jeep was an incredibly challenging and fulfilling project. We did a lot of research around the idea of sunsets, focusing on the sophistication of light and keeping it as natural feeling as possible.

Jeep “Recalculating”

WHERE DO YOU FIND INSPIRATION? ART? PHOTOGRAPHY?
Art, life, reading and my previous experiences.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
My cell, my Dolby monitor and Spotify.

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
I have Facebook, Twitter, Vimeo, Movidiam and Instagram, where I recently started @carretero.color to feature my color work.

DO YOU LISTEN TO MUSIC WHILE YOU WORK?
I always listen to music when I work. Music is great support — it can make you happy in a second! I listen to a lot of different bands, but Band of Horses, Tame Impala, Neil Young, Flaming Lips, Eels, Devendra, The Kills and Spanish music, like Niña Vintage, are some of my favorites!

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
I never let stress control me. Sometimes the challenges of the job are huge, but that’s our work and our industry — we know how to get it done. Challenges are wonderful because they point directly at our creativity. Being uncomfortable sometimes is a good thing. It makes you break down your limitations. Working with a great group of people helps a lot, too, so you can always have fun, even on the hardest days.

SAM names Eric Cooney president/CEO, replaces Tim Thorsteinson

Snell Advanced Media (SAM) has brought on former Tandberg Television president Eric Cooney as president and CEO. As CEO of Tandberg Television, Cooney led its merger with Ericsson Group in 2007. He subsequently resigned to accept the CEO role at NASDAQ-listed IT services provider Internap Corp.

The appointment will see Tim Thorsteinson step down as CEO after two years in the role for personal reasons, which, in the near to medium term, limit his ability to travel. Thorsteinson had led the rebranding of the group — which included Snell and Quantel — as Snell Advanced Media. He will continue to be involved in an advisory capacity to the board as part of a succession plan. He will also remain as a shareholder in SAM.

Headquartered in Newbury, Berkshire, SAM employs almost 600 people across offices in Europe, the Americas, the Middle East and Asia Pacific. The group, which recently reported 20 percent year-on-year growth, is backed by LDC, the private equity arm of Lloyds Banking Group.

Commenting on his appointment, Cooney said, “Snell Advanced Media has seen good growth in recent years, in what has been a challenging market impacted by the changing nature of end-user media consumption. This is testament to its commitment to innovation and integration, whilst keeping its customers front and center.”

SAM delivers a range of technology-led products and solutions across the media production ecosystem, including live production, news and sports editing, post, playout and delivery, modular infrastructure and image processing.

 

Dell 6.15

The long, strange trip of Amir Bar-Lev’s new Dead doc

Deadheads take note — Long Strange Trip, director Amir Bar-Lev’s four-hour documentary on rock’s original jam band, the Grateful Dead, is now available for viewing. While the film had a theatrical release in New York and Los Angeles on May 26, the doc was made available on Amazon Video as a six-episode series.

L-R: Jack Lewars and Keith Jenson.

Encompassing the band’s rise and decades-long career, the film, executive produced by Martin Scorsese, was itself 14 years in the making. That included three months of final post at Technicolor PostWorks New York, where colorist Jack Lewars and online editor Keith Jenson worked with Bar-Lev to finalize the film’s form and look.

The documentary features scores of interviews conducted by Bar-Lev with band members and their associates, as well as a mountain of concert footage and other archival media. All that made editorial conforming complex as Jenson (using Autodesk Flame) had to keep the diverse source material organized and make it fit properly into a single timeline. “We had conversions that were made from old analog tapes, archival band footage, DPX scans from film and everything in between,” he recalls. “There was a lot of cool stuff, which was great, but it required attention to detail to ensure it came out nice and smooth.”

The process was further complicated as creative editorial was ongoing throughout post. New material was arriving constantly. “We do a lot of documentary work here, so that’s something we’re used to,” Jenson says. “We have workflows and failsafes in place for all formats and know how to translate them for the Lustre platform Jack uses. Other than the sheer amount, nothing took us by surprise.”

Lewars faced a similar challenge during grading as he was tasked with bringing consistency to material produced over a long period of time by varying means. The overall visual style, he says, recalls the band’s origins in the psychedelic culture of the 1960s. “It’s a Grateful Dead movie, so there are a lot of references to their experiments with drugs,” he explains. “Some sections have a trippy feel where the visuals go in and out of different formats. It almost gives the viewer the sense of being on acid.”

The color palette, too, has a psychedelic feel, reflecting the free-spirited essence of the band and its co-founder. “Jerry Garcia’s life, his intention and his outlook, was to have fun,” Lewars observes. “And that’s the look we embraced. It’s very saturated, very colorful and very bright. We tried to make the movie as fun as possible.”

The narrative is frequently punctuated by animated sequences where still photographs, archival media and other elements are blended together in kaleidoscopic patterns. Finalizing those sequences required a few extra steps. “For the animation sequences, we had to cut in the plates and get them to Jack to grade,” explains Jenson. “We’d then send the color-corrected plates to the VFX and animation department for treatment. They’d come back as completed elements that we’d cut into the conform.”

The documentary climaxes with the death of Garcia and its aftermath. The guitarist suffered a heart attack in 1995 after years of struggling with diabetes and drug addiction. As those events unfold, the story undergoes a mood change that is mirrored in shifts in the color treatment. “There is a four-minute animated sequence in the last reel where Jerry has just passed and they are recapping the film,” Lewars says. “Images are overlaid on top of images. We colored those plates in hyper saturation, pushing it almost to the breaking point.

“It’s a very emotional moment,” he adds. “The earlier animated sequences introduced characters and were funny. But it’s tied together at the end in a way that’s sad. It’s a whiplash effect.”

Despite the length of the project and the complexity of its parts, it came together with few bumps. “Supervising producer Stuart Macphee and his team were amazing,” says Jenson. “They were very well organized, incredibly so. With so many formats and conversions coming from various sources, it could have snowballed quickly, but with this team it was a breeze.”

Lewars concurs. Long Strange Trip is an unusual documentary both in its narrative style and its looks, and that’s what makes it fascinating for Deadheads and non-fans alike. “It’s not a typical history doc,” Lewars notes. “A lot of documentaries go with a cold, bleach by-pass look and gritty feel. This was the opposite. We were bumping the saturation in parts where it felt unnatural, but, in the end, it was completely the right thing to do. It’s like candy.”

You can binge it now on Amazon Video.


Review: Red Giant Magic Bullet Suite 13, Part 2

By Brady Betzel

In Part 1 of my review of Red Giant’s Magic Bullet Suite 13, I went through Magic Bullet Looks 4 as well as Colorista IV. Both are color correction and grading plug-ins that are compatible with Adobe’s After Effects and Premiere Pro and Apple’s Final Cut Pro X and Motion.

For this review, I will cover the rest of the Magic Bullet Suite 13, including Denoiser III, Mojo II, Cosmo II, Renoiser and Magic Bullet Film. Denoiser III is my definite favorite, by the way.

Denoiser III
In my opinion, Denoiser III is one of the standouts in the Magic Bullet Suite 13 plug-in package because of its magical ability to remove noise quickly and easily. Noise reduction is typically a very long render because of the sheer complexity that is involved in the process. Denoiser III has been rewritten and now adds near realtime playback in most cases; the better the discrete graphics card you have, the better your playback will be. You can check out graphics card compatibility here.

Denoiser 3 – Looks and Denoiser applied.

The options are limited and I believe we are better off for it. A lot of denoise plug-ins have an abundance of options when, in reality, unless you are an online editor nerd like me or a colorist, you probably don’t have time to mess around with the different noise removal options and render each time. Denoiser III has five options: Reduce Noise, Smooth Colors, Preserve Detail, Sharpen Amount and Sharpen Radius.

When removing noise from footage, remember that the more you crank up your noise reduction the longer your render time will be, and you will also start to lose detail in your image. Occasionally, you will remove and sharpen an image and think that it looks a little too cleaned up. This is when you will want to jump into Magic Bullet Renoiser or apply your own film grain or noise to the footage. Another tip is to always place Denoiser III first in your effects chain. You can even put Magic Bullet Looks 4 after Denoiser III, apply your look in Looks and jump back into Denoiser III to adjust your noise after corrected.

When testing in Premiere Pro, I imported some Sony A6300 S-Log3/S-Gamut3 footage lying around. I filmed a close-up of my wife sewing, with just the light of the sewing machine to light the scene. In addition, I shot it in slow motion at 1920×1080 at 23.98fps. I exported 15 seconds of the “raw” footage from Premiere Pro via Adobe Media Encoder as a 1920×1080, 50Mb/s H.264, which took 33 seconds. With Denoiser III applied, it took 46 seconds, about a 29% increase in time. With Denoiser III and Magic Bullet Looks 4 applied, the export took the same 46 seconds. After I was done exporting, I saw that all of the H.264 exports with Denoiser III applied to them were corrupt and unusable in a traditional sense. In another sense, they were pretty awesome. Either way, be sure to check out that link to graphics card compatibility that I have earlier in this review. That should be strictly adhered to. In my head, I thought “Yeah right, I know you say you need an Nvidia or AMD GPU, but I’m sure my Intel…. Nope. Didn’t work.” So check out the compatibility before jumping in head first like me. Aside from that one hiccup, the screen grabs I took will show you how well the Denoiser III works. I tried Denoiser III on a much higher-end system with a discrete Nvidia Quadro card, and Denoiser III worked just as described.

Denoiser III either comes bundled in the Magic Bullet Suite 13 for $899 or can be purchased separately for $199.

Renoiser
As you have read, I just pulled out a lot of noise with Denoiser III, but I definitely want to put back just a touch of texture and noise with Renoiser. A common problem when removing noise from footage is that you are left having an overly processed look from smoothing. Typically, you can somewhat fix that with a little sharpening and/or adding back in some sort of film grain.

Denoiser and Renoiser

Magic Bullet Renoiser will allow you to add GPU-accelerated film-style grain and/or digital style noise to your footage in Premiere Pro, After Effects, Final Cut Pro X, Motion, Blackmagic’s Resolve, Eduis and HitFilm. You can find specfic version compatibility info for these apps with Renoiser here.

Typically, to add noise or grain back to your footage you would purchase stock film grain from somewhere like www.rampantdesigntools.com or gorillagrain.com. Both companies have some great grain offerings, so you should check them out, but stock grain is applied over the footage with a blending mode, like overlay. What Renoiser does is apply the grain and noise as part of your moving image; it’s not an overlay. If you zoom into your image after applying one of the Renoiser presets you will see the actual picture being pseudo-recreated with the grain and/or noise.

Under the Renoiser plug-in you get some quick sharpening options that are handy, even though it’s not a sharpening plug-in. There are 16 presets, including 8mm and 16mm, as well as grain settings like size, color channels, monochrome options and even Tonal Range adjustments to dial in your highlight, midtone and shadow grain work. While this plug-in is GPU-accelerated, it does work with Intel GPUs, so it did not give the same errors on export that I got with Denoiser III.

For my tests, I liked the preset Big Kahuna for the sunset shot I had. This was shot on the Sony a6300 in S-Log3/S-Gamut3, but this time with a UHD 3840×2160 clip in a 1920×1080 timeline, lending itself to a good amount of noise in the shadows. First I added Denoiser III, then Colorista IV to do some balancing and add some saturation and then I finished it off with Renoiser.

I really cranked up the Renoiser to show off its work, but adding noise is usually a practice in subtly. Typically, adding noise is to give an overall cohesion to your film or, oppositely, a disruption. For my footage, while I cranked Renoiser way up it really didn’t overdo it, which is nice; it seems like Red Giant kind of allows you to go all out without destroying your footage with too much artificial grain or noise.

While watching Stu Maschwitz’s (@5tu) Renoiser tutorial I picked up a great tip that I had never thought about — when sending your project through a second compression service, like YouTube, you may notice some of your footage can get artifacting such as banding (rings in things like sunsets or gradients). Stu suggests that because your footage may be too smooth, the compressor can cheat a bit and not fully process your footage, leaving certain areas with banding. A workaround can be to add a light amount of noise to your footage to ensure that the compressor processes your footage completely. In Renoiser, there are a couple of presets like Light Noise, Image Vitamins, and Compression Proofing that might help in getting past those issues.

To test the rendering/exporting power of Renoiser I made a 30-second 50Mb/s H.264 QuickTime from my UHD media, downscaled to HD through Media Encoder. With Magic Bullet Colorista IV and Renoiser applied to the 30-second clip, it took three minutes and four seconds to export. Without Renoiser but with Colorista IV, it took one minute and 30 seconds — roughly 100% speed decrease when using Renoiser. Keep in mind I am on a slower Intel-based GPU, so if you have something like an Nvidia GTX 1080, your results will probably be significantly improved. However, adding and removing noise is an intensive process so that is definitely something to remember.

At first I wasn’t sure if I would be pumped on using Renoiser, since there are so many options out there for adding noise to footage, but I have been convinced. The quality of noise generation and options to personalize it are outstanding. Using Denoiser III, Looks 4 or Colorista IV and Renoiser seems to be a great combo when finishing your project. In the future, I would like to see some more options in the preset category, but with the 16 presets there now, and even an option for a custom preset of your own, you have plenty to choose from.

Mojo II
Out of all the Magic Bullet Suite 13 plug-ins. Mojo II is the one that will provide an instantly recognizable look with one click. Mojo II will basically pull the orange and blue trick while adding a nice contrast curve. A common trend in color correction is to cool off the shadows with blue and warm up the skin tones/mid tones with orange; this is a very popular look from Michael Bay films, hence the preset “Optimus” inside of the Mojo II presets.

Mojo II

To begin, you need to specify whether you have footage that is video, flat, Log or Log Pro. Essentially, Log Pro is footage shot with high-end cameras like the Alexa. But you’ll need to experiment because these are essentially a starting LUT and you have control over what looks the best. For instance, I brought in some more Sony s6300 S-Log3/S-Gamut3 footage, and at first I thought regular old Log would do it, but Log Pro was actually the right fit. There are 15 presets in Mojo II, including Optimus, Light, Mojo and War. Applying a preset really seems like the best way to start in Mojo II.

Since you probably aren’t going to dive too heavily into color correction, adding a preset is the best way to start. There are 13 options in Mojo. A few important ones are: Mojo, which essentially lets you customize the amount of orange and blue that goes into a shot; Punch It, which is contrast; Bleach It; Fade it; and Corrections, which allows for exposure adjustments and other important footage correcting options.

To test my export speed, I used my handy YouTube-friendly preset: 1920×1080 50Mb/s H.264. Exporting a 30-second clip took 30 seconds without Mojo II and one minute and one second with Mojo II applied. So, like the other plug-ins, Mojo II took me about double realtime for the render. At $99, Mojo II is the fastest way to take your footage and give it that orange and blue Hollywood-style look. I was pleasantly surprised at how well the plug-in worked. Immediately, I thought of how someone not familiar with color correction could apply Magic Bullet Suite Mojo II and have a great color grade without the hassle of diving deep into color correction tools. Even if you need to do a little cleanup, there are options like the Skin Tone overlay to get your skin colors right.

Cosmo II
One of the most underused color correction methods is skin correction. A lot of people will color correct for a wrong skin tone, or color cast in a shot, but most will not do beauty work. Why? Because it’s not so easy. A lot of times you have to pull a color key of the skin you want to correct, do a light blur, re-sharpen, re-noise and hope the talent doesn’t move their head too much or you will be tracking as well. With Red Giant’s Cosmo II you can easily select a skin tone to balance, remove lines or even attempt to remove blemishes. Skin correction is a very tough skill to master; there is a delicate balance between overly corrected and not corrected enough.

Cosmo II

With Cosmo II, you can select the skin tone of the subject you want to correct with the eyedropper and adjust how far outside of your color selection you want Cosmo to go with tolerance and offset. Further down the effects menu are two other categories of options: Skin Smoothing and Skin Color. Typically, in skin correction you might see someone go overboard with the softening (or blurring). One way that Red Giant is combatting bad skin correction is with adjustments like Preserve Detail, Preserve Contrast and even Restore Noise. When used in concert you can achieve some great wrinkle removal, but allow some of the authentic contours of the skin to stay intact with Preserving Detail.

Under the Skin Color menu you can fix things like blotchy colors with Skin Yellow/Pink and Skin Color Unify. Much like the other Red Giant Magic Bullet Suite 13 plugins, you can also enable the “Show Skin Overlay,” which throws an orange grid over your skin tone selection to help guide you towards a proper skin color. Nothing is better, however, than the human eye when using a properly calibrated monitor, so don’t forget to take a step back and actually digest the adjustments you are making.

Magic Bullet Film
Last in the Magic Bullet Suite 13 package is Magic Bullet Film — a set of negative stocks and print stocks that help you emulate the look of actual film. First you choose your type of video: Video, Flat, or Log. Then you can choose a Negative Stock and Print Stock. While I am a post nerd, I definitely do not have every print and negative stock committed to memory, so cycling through the options is helpful. I had some footage I shot at Disneyland California Adventure that was captured inside of a room with tons of crazy lights and screens, but it seemed to be a great shot to test Magic Bullet Film on. I applied the negative stock Prolochrome P4400 and the print stock Fujifilm 3521XD. My shot had some nice greens and blues in it and these seemed to complement it well. I was really impressed with how the footage looked with Magic Bullet Film applied; it gave a really over-the-top teal look. After you apply the look you can dial-in some specifics like color temperature, exposure, contrast, skin tone, grain and even a vignette.

Magic Bullet Film

Another interesting adjustment is the Vintage/Modern slider, which, when boosted, adds a contrasty blue and yellow look. When lowered, it adds a brown, washed-out look.

Summing Up
When I finally finished this two-part extra-long review, my appreciation for “set-it-and-forget-it” plug-ins. Magic Bullet Suite 13 is a phenomenal set of color correction plug-ins that allow you to do as much or as little as you want to your footage while always having a great end product.

You really can’t put a value on a truly great colorist — they put a certain shine on video that sometimes can’t even be put into words. But with that responsibility and skill comes a heavy price tag — for the rest of us you can still get a great look with Magic Bullet Suite 13. Find out more on Red Giant’s website — the entire suite runs $899, but you can purchase each plug-in separately.


Brady Betzel is an Emmy-nominated online editor at Margarita Mix in Hollywood, working on Life Below Zero and Cutthroat Kitchen. You can email Brady at bradybetzel@gmail.com. Follow him on Twitter @allbetzroff.


A glimpse at what was new at NAB

By Lance Holte

I made the trek out to Las Vegas last week for the annual NAB show to take in the latest in post production technology, discuss new trends and products and get lost in a sea of exhibits. With over 1,700 exhibitors, it’s impossible to see everything (especially in the two days I was there), but here are a handful of notable things that caught my eye.

Blackmagic DaVinci Resolve Studio 14: While the “non-studio” version is still free, it’s hard to beat the $299 license for the full version of Resolve. As 4K and 3D media becomes increasingly prevalent, and with the release of their micro and mini panels, Resolve can be a very affordable solution for editors, mobile colorists and DITs.

The new editorial and audio tools are particularly appealing to someone like me, who is often more hands-on on the editorial side than the grading side of post. To that regard, the new tracking features look to provide extra ease of use for quick and simple grades. I also love that Blackmagic has gotten rid of the dongles, which removes the hassle of tracking numerous dongles in a post environment where systems and rooms are swapped regularly. Oh, and there’s bin, clip and timeline locking for collaborative workflows, which easily pushes Resolve into the competition for an end-to-end post solution.

Adobe Premiere CC 2017 with After Effects and Audition Adobe Premiere is typically my editorial application of choice, and the increased integration of AE and Audition promise to make an end-to-end Creative Cloud workflow even smoother. I’ve been hoping for a revamp of Premiere’s title tool for a while, and the Essential Graphics panel/new Title Tool appears to greatly increase and streamline Premiere’s motion graphics capabilities — especially as someone who does almost all my graphics work in After Effects and Photoshop. The more integrated the various applications can be, the better; and Adobe has been pushing that aspect for some time now.

On the audio side, Premiere’s Essential Sound Panel tools for volume matching, organization, cleanup and other effects without going directly into Audition (or exporting for ProTools, etc.) will be really helpful, especially for smaller projects and offline mixes. And as a last note, the new Camera Shake Deblur effect in After Effects is fantastic.

Dell UltraSharp 4K HDR Monitor — There were a lot of great looking HDR monitors at the show, but I liked that this one fell in the middle of the pack in terms of price point ($2K), with solid specs (1000 nits, 97.7% of P3, and 76.9% of Rec. 2020) and a reasonable size (27 inches). Seems like a good editorial or VFX display solution, though the price might be pushing budgetary constraints for smaller post houses. I wish it was DCI 4K instead of UHD and a little more affordable, but that will hopefully come with time.

On that note, I really like HP’s DreamColor Z31x Studio Display. It’s not HDR, but it’s 99% of the P3 colorspace, and it’s DCI 4K — as well as 2K, by multiplying every pixel at 2K resolution into exactly 4 pixels — so there’s no odd-numbered scaling and sharpening required. Also, I like working with large monitors, especially at high resolutions. It offers automated (and schedulable) color calibration, though I’d love to see a non-automated display in the future if it could bring the price down. I could see the HP monitor as a great alternative to using more expensive HDR displays for the majority of workstations at many post houses.

As another side note, Flanders Scientific’s OLED 55-inch HDR display was among the most beautiful I’ve ever seen, but with numerous built-in interfaces and scaling capabilities, it’s likely to come at a higher price.

Canon 4K600STZ 4K HDR laser projector — This looks to be a great projection solution for small screening rooms or large editorial bays. It offers huge 4096×2400 resolution, is fairly small and compact, and apparently has very few restraints when it comes to projection angle, which would be nice for a theatrical edit bay (or a really nice home theater). The laser light source is also attractive because it will be low maintenance. At $63K, it’s at the more affordable end of 4K projector pricing.

Mettle 360 Degree/VR Depth plug-ins: I haven’t worked with a ton of 360-degree media, but I have dealt with the challenges of doing depth-related effects in a traditional single-camera space, so the fact that Mettle is doing depth-of-field effects, dolly effects and depth volumetric effects with 360-degree/VR content is pretty incredible. Plus, their plug-ins are designed to integrate with Premiere and After Effects, which is good news for an Adobe power user. I believe they’re still going to be in beta for a while, but I’m very curious to see how their plug-ins play out.

Finally, in terms of purely interesting tech, Sony’s Bravia 4K acoustic surface TVs are pretty wild. Their displays are OLED, so they look great, and the fact that the screen vibrates to create sound instead of having separate speakers or an attached speaker bar is awfully cool. Even at very close viewing, the screen doesn’t appear to move, though it can clearly be felt vibrating when touched. A vibrating acoustic surface raises some questions about mounting, so it may not be perfect for every environment, but interesting nonetheless.


Lance Holte is an LA-based post production supervisor and producer. He has spoken and taught at such events as NAB, SMPTE, SIGGRAPH and Createasphere. You can email him at lance@lanceholte.com.


My NAB 2017 top five

By Brady Betzel

So once again, I didn’t go to NAB. I know, I should go, but to be honest I get caught up in my day job and my family, so usually I forget about NAB until the week before and by that time it’s too late to pull off. I’m hoping to go next year, like really hoping I make plans.

So there or not, I was paying close attention to the announcements that came out of new products, and even updates to older products. Let’s be real, other than doing some face-to-face networking, you can really get the same if not more info by lurking online. Below are five announcements that really got my attention.

Blackmagic’s DaVinci Resolve 14
Blackmagic saw that this year’s Resolve update from 12.5.5 to 14 is so good they skipped 13. There was a significant drop in the DaVinci Resolve Studio price from $999 to $299, while adding features that many of the top NLE/color correction software dogs are lacking.

The beauty of Resolve is that it is first and foremost an industry-proven color correction powerhouse, one that is used on many of the top movies and television shows in the industry.

They are also expanding their footprint laterally to encompass professional audio as well as professional video. In Resolve 14, Blackmagic has added a Fairlight audio page to allow for a much more Pro Tools-like editing experience within the same Resolve app we have all grown to become extremely excited about. In my mind that means that at a professional facility, or your own garage, you can have a editor/colorist sitting with a re-recording engineer to review a movie or a show with the client at the same time.

The Fairlight page within Resolve 14.

As long as you have two separate workstations, the colorist and audio mixer can be addressing notes on the same sequence inside of Resolve 14 because of the newly updated collaboration enhancements. The Audio mixer or colorist could then refresh their sequence to update it with any changes the other had made and see them immediately reflected.

I haven’t gotten my hands on this update in a proper environment to test out the collaboration functionality, but the timeline comparison and review features seem like a godsend to anyone who does any sort of conform work. It is the beginning of Blackmagic’s path toward Avid Media Composer’s lock on the industry with their sequence and project sharing.

On Twitter, Blackmagic’s director of DaVinci software engineering, Rohit Gupta answered my question about whether EDLs and AAFs will fall in line with the timeline review. He said it will work “irrespective of how you create the timeline. So it will work with EDL/AAF too.”

Clip, sequence and bin locking are the future for collaborative workflow inside of Resolve. I would love to see how someone uses these features in a large collaborative environment of 10 or more editors, sound editors and colorists. How does Resolve 14 handle multiple sequence updates and multiple people knocking on a bin? How does Resolve work on something like an Avid Nexis?

Moving on, while I’m not an audio guy I do realize that Fairlight is a big player in the pro audio industry, maybe not as sizable a footprint as Avid Pro Tools in the United States, but it still has its place. So Blackmagic inserting Fairlight technology, including hardware compatibility, into Resolve 14 is remarkable.

The Resolve 14 update seems to have been focused on everything but the color correction tools. Except for the supposed major speed boost and options like face tracking, Blackmagic is putting all its eggs into the general NLE basket. It doesn’t bother me that much to be honest, and I think Blackmagic is picking up where a few other NLE players are leaving off. I just hope they don’t spread Resolve so thin that it loses its core audience. But again, with the price of Resolve 14 Studio coming in at $299 it’s becoming the major player in the post nonlinear editor, color correction, and now audio finishing market.

Keep in mind, Resolve 14 is technically still in beta so you will most likely run into bugs, probably mostly under the Fairlight tab, so be careful if you plan on using this version in time-critical environments.

You can find all of Blackmagic’s NAB 2017 updates at www.blackmagicdesign.com, including a new ATEM Studio Pro HD switcher, UltraStudio HD Mini with Thunderbolt 3 and even a remote Bluetooth camera control app for the Ursa Mini Pro.

SmallHD Focus
There was a lot of buzz online about SmallHD’s Focus monitor. It’s an HDMI-based external touchscreen monitor that is supposedly two to three times brighter than your DSLR’s monitor. People online were commenting about how bright the monitor actually was and about the $499 price tag. It looks like it will be released in June, and I can’t wait to see it.

In addition to being a bright external monitor it has a built-in waveform, false color, focus assist, 3D LUTs, Pixel Zoom and many more features. I really like the feature that offers auxiliary power out to power your camera with the Focus’ Sony L Series battery. You can check it out here.

Atomos Sumo
Another external monitor that was being talked about was the 1,200-nit Atomos 19-inch Sumo, a self-proclaimed “on-set and in-studio 4Kp60 HDR 19-inch monitor-recorder.” It boasts some heavy specs, like the ability to record 4K 12bit Raw and 10-bit ProRes/DNxHR — plus it’s 19 inches!

What’s really smart is that it can double as an HDR grading monitor back in the edit suite. It will map color formats Log, PQ and HLG with its AtomHDR engine. Technically, it supports Sony SLog2/SLog3, Canon CLog/CLog 2, Arri Log C, Panasonic Vlog, JVC JLog, Red LogFilm Log formats and Sony SGamut/SGamut3/SGamut3.cine, Canon Cinema, BT2020, DCI P3, DCI P3+, Panasonic V Gamut and Arri Alexa Wide Gamut color gamuts. While the Sumo will record in 4K, it’s important to note that the monitor is actually a 10-bit, 1920×1080 resolution monitor with SDI and HDMI inputs and outputs.

The Atomos Sumo is available for pre-order now for $2,495. Get the complete list of specs here.

Avid Everywhere
This year, Avid Media Composer editors saw a roadmap for future updates like an updated Title Tool that is higher than HD compatible (finally!), an advanced color correction mode and Avid Everywhere based on the MediaCentral platform.

If you’ve ever seen an app like Avid Media Composer work through the cloud, you will probably agree how amazing it is. If you haven’t, essentially you will log in to Media Composer via a web browser or a light on machine app that runs all of the hard processing on the server that you are logging in to. The beauty of this is that you can essentially log in wherever you want and edit. Since the hard work is being done on the other end you can log in using a laptop or even a tablet that has decent Internet speed and edit high-resolution media. Here comes that editing on the beach job I was wanting. You can check out all of the Avid Everywhere updates here.

In addition Avid announced Media Composer First — a free version of Media Composer. They also released an updated IO – DNxIQ, essentially with the Thunderbolt 3 update along with a live cross-convert .

Sony a9
With all eyes on Sony to reveal the most anticipated full frame cameras in prosumer history — a7RIII and a7SIII — we are all surprised when they unveiled the 24.4MP a9. The a9 is Sony’s answer to heavy weights Canon and Nikon professional full-frame cameras that have run the markets for years.

With a pretty amazing blackout-free continuous shooting ability alongside an Ethernet port and dual SD card slots, the a9 is a beauty. While I am not a huge fan of Sony’s menu setup, I am really interested to see the footage and images come out on the web; there is something great about Sony’s images and video in my eyes. Besides my personal thoughts, there is also a five-axis in-body stabilization, UHD (3840×2160) video recording across the entire width of the sensor and even Super 35 recording. Check out more info here .

In the end, NAB 2017 was a little lackluster in terms of barn-burner hardware and software releases, however I feel that Blackmagic has taken the cake with the DaVinci Resolve 14 release. Keep in mind Blackmagic is also releasing updates to products like the Ursa Mini Pro, new Hyperdeck Studio Mini and updates to the ultra-competitive Blackmagic Video Assist, adding ever-valuable scopes.


Brady Betzel is an Emmy-nominated online editor at Margarita Mix in Hollywood, working on Life Below Zero and Cutthroat Kitchen. You can email Brady at bradybetzel@gmail.com. Follow him on Twitter @allbetzroff.


MTI Film updates Cortex for V.4, includes Dolby Vision HDR metadata editing

MTI Film is updating its family of Cortex applications and tools, highlighted by Cortex V.4. In addition to legacy features such as a dailies toolset, IMF and AS-02 packaging and up-res algorithms, Cortex V.4 adds DCP packaging (with integrated ACES color support), an extended edit tool and officially certified Dolby Vision metadata editing capabilities.

“We allow users to manipulate Dolby Vision HDR metadata in the same way that they edit segments of video,” says Randy Reck, MTI Film’s director of development. “In the edit tool, they can graphically trim, cut and paste, add metadata to video, analyze new segments that need metadata and adjust parameters within the Dolby Vision metadata on a shot-by-shot basis.”

With the integration of the Dolby Vision ecosystem, Cortex V.4 provides a method for simultaneously QC-ing HDR and SDR versions of a shot with Dolby Vision metadata. For delivery, the inclusion of the Dolby Vision “IMF-like” output format allows for the rendering and delivery of edited Dolby Vision metadata alongside HDR media in one convenient package.

Cortex V.4’s Edit Tool has been updated to include industry-standard trimming and repositioning of edited segments within the timeline through a drag-and-drop function. The entire look of the Edit Tool (available in the Dailies and Enterprise editions of Cortex) has also been updated to accommodate a new dual-monitor layout, making it easier for users to scrub through media in the source monitor while keeping the composition in context in the record monitor.

MTI Film is also offering a new subscription-based DIT+ edition of Cortex. “It doesn’t make sense for productions to purchase a full software package if their schedule includes a hiatus when it won’t be used,” explains Reck.

DIT+ contains all aspects of the free DIT version of Cortex with the added ability to render HD ProRes, DNx and H.264 files for delivery. A DIT+ subscription starts at $95 per month, and MTI Film is offering a special NAB price of $595 for the first year.


FilmLight shows new versions of color tools at NAB

FilmLight was at NAB demo-ing Version 5.0 of its color tools. The upgraded toolkit maintains a consistent user experience across the Baselight color grading and finishing system, Baselight Editions, Daylight and FilmLight’s new on-set application, Prelight.

“We are delivering 5.0 everywhere, bringing a new level of color control and creative possibilities from the very start of a production right to the final deliverables,” says Wolfgang Lempp, CEO of FilmLight. “And, importantly, color and artistic intent are accompanying all deliverables precisely and with minimum effort, be it for HDR and SDR or even 360 VR grading.”

Version 5.0 introduces Base Grade, which mimics the way the eye sees color to yield a more natural feel. Version 5.0 also includes some new VFX features, such as paint, perspective tracking, warping, depth keying and relighting.

FilmLight’s new Prelight On-Set, a Mac OS app for preview and grading, brings color control and the FilmLight BLG (Baselight Linked Grade) metadata system to shoots.

With Version 5.0, Baselight Editions, the plug-ins for Avid and Nuke 5.0, now include Base Grade functionality as well as color tools, such as midtone contrast and filters for denoise and deflicker. In addition, Baselight for Nuke includes boosted functionality in the Version 5.0 BLG that enables the tool to act as a multi-input node in Nuke. In this manner, BLG files can refer to multiple input images and OpenEXR channels.


Review: Red Giant Magic Bullet Suite: Looks 4 and Colorist IV

By Brady Betzel

Color grading is an art unto itself. A dedicated colorist can make your footage look so good, your response upon seeing it will likely be, “I had no idea it could look like this.”

Unfortunately, as an editor you don’t have the opportunity to spend 10 hours a day honing the craft of color correction. You don’t sit in front of high-end color correction panels while surrounded by thousands of dollars worth of equipment whose reason for being is taking everyday footage and pulling peoples’ minds inside out.

Even with Blackmagic’s free version of DaVinci Resolve out in the wild, color correction is a skill that takes a lot of time to hone. Don’t fool yourself, one, two or three years doesn’t really even scratch the surface of the dedication you need to dive into the dark art of color correction, and most color correction artists are more than willing to tell you that. Hopefully, that doesn’t discourage you on your journey to becoming a color master, because it is an awesome career in my opinion. I mean how many people get to play with what are essentially digital crayons all day and get paid to do it?

For those who don’t have hundreds of hours to learn the magic of apps like Resolve, Pablo Rio and Baselight, or even color correction inside of an NLE like Avid Symphony or Adobe Premiere for that matter — you still have the ability to create stunning footage with plug-ins like Red Giant’s Magic Bullet Suite.

The Magic Bullet Suite is a set of color correction and video finishing plug-ins that work in multiple multimedia apps like Adobe’s Premiere and After Effects, and some even work inside of Final Cut Pro X, Motion, Resolve and Avid Media Composer/Symphony.

If you’ve been around editing for a while, you’ve probably heard of Magic Bullet Looks; it’s one of the most common color correction plug-ins that people use to quickly and easily color correct and grade their footage. The full contents in Magic Bullet Suite 13 include Magic Bullet Looks, Magic Bullet Colorista IV, Magic Bullet Film, Magic Bullet Cosmo II, Magic Bullet Denoiser III, Magic Bullet Mojo II and Magic Bullet Denoiser. While all of these Magic Bullet plug-ins can be purchased separately, they are available as a suite for $899 as well as at an academic price of $449. There is also an upgrade price of $299 if you are a previous version user.

Magic Bullet Suite 13 has been overhauled, with one of the biggest additions being OpenGL and OpenCL support, allowing incredible speed gains. In this review, I am going to provide a plug-in-by-plug-in review, so you can see if $899 is an investment you should make. Up first is the heavy hitter of the suite: Magic Bullet Looks.

Magic Bullet Looks
At $399, Magic Bullet Looks 4 is just one piece of the Magic Bullet Suite 13 set, but it’s probably the most well known. Looks is a color correction plug-in that works with most major nonlinear editing apps, including Premiere Pro CC, After Effects CC, Final Cut Pro X 10.2.3 and up, Apple Motion 5.2.3 and up, Magix Vegas Pro 14, Avid Media Composer 8.5-8.7, Blackmagic DaVinci Resolve 12.5, Edius 8.2 and Hit Film Pro 2017.

Essentially, Magic Bullet Looks 4 is a color correction plug-in that you would typically start with a preset correction or grade that Looks has built in. Think of it like a set of over 200 color grading LUTs (Look-Up Tables) that can be finessed, changed and layered — from there you can add vignetting, video noise or even one of my favorites: chromatic aberration.

There are a few new updates in Looks 4 that make this version the one to purchase. Version 3 had GPU acceleration, but Version 4 includes OpenCL- and OpenGL-compatibility for better realtime playback with color graded footage; the Renoiser Tool which can help to add video noise or film grain back into denoised footage; and my favorite technical feature that I hope other apps include — the ability to resize the color scopes and even zoom into the Hue/Saturation scope.

While using Magic Bullet Looks, I discovered just how easy Red Giant made it to add a “look” to footage, add some grain and a vignette and then export. While the Lumetri Color tools in Premiere Pro CC were a great addition, they left some things to be desired, and in my opinion, Red Giant Magic Bullet Looks picks up where Premiere’s Lumetri Color tools left off. To apply Magic Bullet Looks 4, you can find it in the Effects drop-down under Video Effects > Magic Bullet > Looks, scrub over to the Effect Controls window and click on “Edit Look.” From there you will be launched into the Magic Bullet Looks plugin GUI. Before you get started it might be handy to open up the Magic Bullet Looks user guide, especially the keyboard shortcuts.

To try out Magic Bullet Looks, I had some Sony a6300 footage lying around waiting to be color corrected. Once inside of the Magic Bullet Looks’ GUI I saw another new feature called the Source tool, which quickly allows you to specify if you are working with Log, flat or video footage — basically, a quick LUT to get you to a starting point — nothing ground breaking, but definitely handy. From there you can open the “Looks” slideout and choose from the hundreds of preset looks. I immediately found “Color Play” and chose “Skydance,” a trippy, ultra-saturated preset with a couple of color gradients, a preset color grade using Colorista (which I will cover later in this space) and some curve adjustments.

If you want to check the values against a scope you can click on the “Scopes” slideout. If you are on a small monitor you may have to close the “Looks” slideout to see the scopes. From here you can check out your footage on a scalable RGB Parade, Slice Graph (displays color values from one line in your image), zoomable Hue/Saturation, Hue/Lightness, Memory Colors (really interesting and deserves a read), and Skin Tone Overlay, which adds lines over your image where it believes the true skin tone colors are coming through.

To apply and begin customizing a look, you can add a preset by double clicking it. It will then apply itself to your clip or adjustment layer. At the same time, it will layout any specific tools used into what Red Giant calls the “Tool Chain,” or the row of tools along the bottom of the GUI. This Tool Chain is important because it is the order of operations. If you put a tool on the right side of the Tool Chain it will impact the preceding tools on the left. For example, if you double click the Print Bleach Bypass tool (which is also awesome and gives a shiny silvery-like polish) it will place the effect naturally at the end of the Tool Chain. This impacts all previous effects, basically creating an end to the order of operations. If you want to get tricky, Magic Bullet Looks allows you to disrupt the order of operations in the Tool Chain by Alt+dragging the tool to a different spot in the Tool Chain. This can be a great method for building a unique look, essentially disrupting the normal order of operations to get a new perspective (on a Mac it is Option+drag).

Once I completed my quick look build, I clicked the check mark on the bottom of the window and was back in Premiere Pro CC 2017 playing my Sony a6300 footage in realtime with the Magic Bullet Look applied at 100 percent strength with no slowdowns. To be clear, I am not running a super-fast machine. In fact, it’s essentially a powerful tablet with an Intel i7 3.10Ghz processor, 8GB of RAM and an Intel Iris GPU, so playing down this look in realtime is pretty amazing.

For a test I trimmed my clip down to one minute in length and added Magic Bullet Look’s Color Play preset “Skydance” — which I mentioned earlier adds chromatic aberration inside of the plugin. I then exported it as a 1080p H.264 QuickTime at around 10 to12 Mb/s, which is basically a highly compressed QuickTime for YouTube, Instagram or Twitter. It took about four minutes and eighteen seconds with the look applied, and one minute without the look applied. So it took quite a bit longer to export with the look, but that can expected with a heavy color grading process. Obviously, with a fast system with a GPU like an Nvidia GTX 1080, you will be chewing through this type of export.

In the end, Magic Bullet Looks 4 is a great paint-by-numbers way of color correcting and grading, but with the ability to highly modify what is being used to create that look. I really love it. As someone who color corrects most of his footage the “old” way with wheels and such, it’s a breath of fresh air to jump into a plug-in that will give you a pretty great output with the same ability to dial in your look that a colorist may be used to but in half the time.

One thing you will notice as I review the rest of the plug-ins in the rest of the Magic Bullet Suite 13 is that the plugins Colorista, Renoiser, and Mojo II are also included with Magic Bullet Looks 4 but only when used inside of the plug-in. When you purchase the entire Magic Bullet Suite 13 you get those as standalone plugins, a feature that I actually like a lot better than working inside of the Looks plug-in. It’s something to consider if you can’t shell out the full $899.

Colorista IV
Colorista IV is a color correction and grading plug-in that is similar in function to Adobe’s Lumetri color tools, but surpasses it. It is compatible with Premiere Pro CC, After Effects CC, Final Cut Pro X 10.2.3 and up, and Motion 5.2.3 and up. Inside of Premiere, Colorista IV offers a much more intuitive workflow for color correction and color grading than Lumetri. But I really think Colorista shines in apps like After Effects where you don’t have as robust color correction options.

Colorista IV consists of a three-way color corrector with the standard Shadows, Midtones and Highlight adjustments, new Temperature and Tint controls to help adjust white balance issues, an exposure compensation, Highlight Recovery, Pop, Hue-Saturation-Lightness wheels and many more adjustments. Right off the bat you can now specify whether your footage is video (basically Rec.709) or Log. When you specify Log, Colorista will actually work a little differently and a little better for your footage than if you tried to use the video color mode. While that is not an uncommon feature/workflow in color correction apps, it is an important update to the Colorista toolset.

Another update is the Guided Color correction, which walks you through color balancing an image in seven steps. I have to say it’s not too bad. After about five different guided color balances using the Guided Color Correction I came to the same conclusion: it looks a little too contrasty but it’s not a bad starting point. Think of it like a guided auto correct. It even shows before and afters of your image while making adjustments in the Guided section. In fact, if you are learning to color correct this is a great way to simply understand a basic initial step when correcting.

After you run through the guided correction, you can fine-tune anything you did in that process, including using Colorista’s Key Mode. The Key Mode of Colorista is a simplified version of secondary keying in color correcting apps. If you want to isolate a skin tone or a specific color that is possibly too saturated, you can enable the Key Mode, select the color you want to adjust by using the color selectors or even using the HSL Cube, and adjust your selection From here Colorista gives you a few options: “Apply” the key, “Cutout” the key, or “Show Key” which will turn the image into a black and white matte for some more advanced adjustments that reach beyond the scope of this review but can be fun and extremely helpful.. You can also select the “Show Skin Overlay” checkbox that will overlay a checkerboard-like pattern on the parts of your image when they have “proper” skin tone colors; it’s pretty useful when doing beauty work and keys in Colorista.

The last two categories in Colorista IV are the Structure & Lighting and Tone Curve & LUT. Structure allows for quick adjustments to the shadows, highlights, pop (basically sharpness) and adding a vignette. The Tone Curve is a multipoint curve, much like curves in every other color correcting app, and at the bottom is where you can load your own LUT or choose a specific technical LUT, such as Sony’s Slog 2 or 3.

Summing Up
In the end, Magic Bullet Looks and Colorist IV are plug-ins that can be super simple or very meticulous depending on your mood or skill level. While almost everything in these plug-ins can be achieved without a plug-in, Colorista IV and Looks gives a simple and straightforward interface for accomplishing great color balance, a correction and grade.

One of my favorite features inside the updated Colorista IV is the new panel, which can be opened by clicking on the menu bar: Window > Extensions > Magic Bullet Colorista IV. You can keep this panel open and instantly begin color correcting a clip without having to drag the effect onto every clip you want to correct; it will automatically apply it to whichever layer is selected. If you are interested in color correction and want to ease into the complexity, Magic Bullet Looks 4 and Colorist IV are a great way to learn.

In the next Magic Bullet review I will be covering the rest of the plugins that comprise the Suite 13 plug-in set, including Magic Bullet Denoiser III which has been revamped and rivals Neat Video (an industry standard noise reduction plug-in), Cosmo II, Renoiser and Film. To buy all of these together check this out, where you can occasionally find everything at a discount.


Brady Betzel is an Emmy-nominated online editor at Margarita Mix in Hollywood, working on Life Below Zero and Cutthroat Kitchen. You can email Brady at bradybetzel@gmail.com. Follow him on Twitter @allbetzroff.

Eizo intros DCI-4K reference monitor for HDR workflows

Eizo will be at NAB next week demonstrating its ColorEdge Prominence CG3145 31.1-inch reference monitor, which offers DCI-4K resolution (4096×2160) for pro HDR post workflows.

Eizo says the ColorEdge Prominence CG3145 can display both very bright and very dark areas on the screen without sacrificing the integrity of either. The monitor achieves the 1000cd/m (typical) high brightness level needed for an HDR content display. It can achieve a typical contrast ratio of 1,000,000:1 for displaying true blacks.

The ColorEdge Prominence CG3145 supports both the HLG (Hybrid Log-Gamma) and PQ (Perceptual Quantization) curves so post pros can rely on a monitor compliant with industry standards for HDR video.

The ColorEdge Prominence CG3145 supports various video formats, including HDMI input compatible with 10-bit 4:2:2 at 50/60p. The DisplayPort input supports up to 10-bit 4:4:4 at 50/60p. Additional features include 98 percent of the DCI-P3 color space smooth gradations with 10-bit display from a 24-bit LUT (look-up-table) and an optional light-shielding hood.
The ColorEdge Prominence CG3145 will begin shipping in early 2018.

In addition to the new ColorEdge Prominence CG3145 HDR reference monitor, Eizo currently offers optional HLG and PQ curves for many of its current CG Series monitors. The optimized gamma curves render images to appear more true to how the human eye perceives the real world compared to SDR. This HDR gamma support is available as an option for ColorEdge CG318-4K, CG248-4K, CG277 and CG247X. Both gamma curves were standardized by the ITU as ITU-R BT.2100. In addition, the PQ curve was standardized by SMPTE as ST-2084.