Category Archives: Collaboration

The A-List: Manchester by the Sea director Kenneth Lonergan

By Iain Blair

It’s been 16 years since filmmaker and playwright Kenneth Lonergan made his prize-winning debut at Sundance with You Can Count on Me, which he wrote and directed. The film won the Sundance Grand Jury Prize and was an Academy Award and Golden Globe nominee for Best Screenplay.

Lonergan’s most recent film is also garnering award attention. Directed by one of the most distinctive writing talents on the American indie scene today, Manchester by the Sea, fulfills that earlier promise and extends Lonergan’s artistic vision.

Kenneth Lonergan

Both an ensemble piece and an intense character study, Manchester by the Sea tells the story of how the life of Lee Chandler (Casey Affleck), a grieving and solitary Boston janitor, is transformed when he reluctantly returns to his hometown to take care of his teenage nephew Patrick (Lucas Hedges) after the sudden death of his older brother Joe (Kyle Chandler). It’s also the story of the Chandlers, a working-class family living in a Massachusetts fishing village for generations, and a deeply poignant, unexpectedly funny exploration of the power of familial love, community, sacrifice and hope.

Co-produced by Matt Damon, the film from Roadside Attractions and Amazon Studios — which received four SAG nominations, a crucial Oscars barometer — has a stellar behind-the-scenes list of collaborators, including DP Jody Lee Lipes (Trainwreck, Martha Marcy May Marlene), editor Jennifer Lame (Mistress America, Paper Towns), composer Lesley Barber (You Can Count on Me) and production designer Ruth De Jong (The Master, The Tree of Life).

I recently spoke with Lonergan about making the film and his workflow.

I heard Matt Damon was very involved in the genesis of this. How did this project come about?
Matt, his producer Chris Moore and John Krasinski were talking on the set of this film they were shooting about ideas for Matt’s directing debut. Matt and John brought me the basic idea and asked me to write it. So, I took some of their suggestions and went off and spent a couple of years working on it and expanding it. I don’t really start off with themes when I write. I always start with characters and stories that seem compelling, and then let the themes emerge as I go, and with this it became about people dealing with terrible loss, with the story of this man who’s carrying a weight that’s just too much to bear. It’s about loss, family and how people cope.

Is it true that Damon was going to star in it originally?
Yes, but what actually happened was that John was going to star and Matt was going to direct it, but then John’s schedule got too busy and then Matt was going to star and direct it, and then he also got too busy, so then I came onboard to also direct.

You ended up with a terrific cast. What did Casey Affleck, Michelle Williams and Lucas Hedges bring to their roles?
Casey’s a truly wonderful actor who brings tremendous emotional depth even without saying much in a scene. He’s very hard working, never has a false moment and really has the ability to navigate through the complicated relationships and in the way he deals with people.

Michelle has a tremendous sense of character and is just brilliant, I think. She brings a beautiful characterization to the film and has to go through some pretty intense emotions. They’re both very generous actors, as there are a lot of people they have to interact with. They’re not show-boaters who just want to get up there and emote. And Lucas is this real find, a very talented young actor just starting out who really captured this character.

You shot this on location all over Cape Ann. How tough was it?
It was a bit grueling, as we shot from March until April and it was pretty cold a lot of the time, especially during prep and scouting in February. We had some schedule and budget pressures, but nothing out of the ordinary. I loved shooting around Cape Ann — the locals were great, and the place really seeped into the film in a way that I’m very happy about.

Do you like the post process?
I love post because of the quiet and the chance to really concentrate on making the film. I also like the lack of administrative duties and the sudden drop in the large number of people I’m responsible for on a set. It’s just you, the editor and editorial staff. Some of the technical finishing procedures can be a bit tiring after you’ve seen the film so many times, but overall post is very enjoyable for me.

I loved my editor, and doing all the sound mixing; it was so much fun putting it all together and seeing the story work, all without the stress of the shoot. You still have pressures, but not on the same scale. We did all the post in New York at Technicolor Postworks, and we worked from May through September so it was a pretty relaxed schedule. We had our basic template done by October, and then we did a bunch of little fixes from that point on so it would be ready for Sundance. Then we did a bit more work on it, but didn’t change much — we added four minutes.

Talk about working with editor Jennifer Lame. Was she on the set?
No, we sent her dailies in New York and we never actually met face-to-face until after the shoot. I had to interview her on the phone when she was in LA working on another job, and we got along right away. She’s a wonderful editor. We began cutting on Avid Media Composer at Technicolor Postworks and then did some over the summer at my rental house in Long Island, where she’d come over and set up. Then we finished up back in New York.

How challenging were all the flashbacks to cut, as they’re quite abrupt?
All the flashbacks were very interesting to put together, but they didn’t really present more of a challenge than anything else because they’re such an intrinsic part of the whole story. We didn’t want to telegraph them and warn the audience by doing them differently. We discussed them a lot. Should they be color-timed differently? Should they be shot differently? Look and sound different?

In the end, we decided they should be indistinguishable from the rest, and it’s mainly only because of the content and behavior that you know they’re flashbacks. They were fun to weave into the story, and the more seamless they were the better we liked it. Jennifer actually pointed out that it was almost like telling two stories, not just one, because that’s how Lee experiences the world. He’s always dealing with memories which pop up when they’re least wanted, and when he returns home to Manchester he’s flooded by memories — for him the past and present are almost the same.

You shot in early spring, but there’s a lot of winter scenes, so you must have needed some visual effects?
Some, but not that much. Hectic Electric in Amsterdam did them all. We had some snow enhancement, we added some smoke, clean-up and did some adjustments for light and weather, but scenes like the house fire were all real.

How important is sound and music to you?
It’s hard to overstate. For me, music has the biggest influence on the feeling of a scene after the acting — even more than the cinematography in how it can instantly change the tone and feeling. You can make it cheerful or sad or ominous or peaceful just with the right music, and it adds all these new layers to the story and goes right to your emotions. So I love working with my composer and finding the right music.

Then I asked [supervising sound editor/re-recording mixer] Jacob Ribicoff to record sounds up in Cape Ann at all our locations — the particular sound of the marina, the woods, the bars — so it was all grounded in reality. The whole idea of post sound, which we did at Technicolor Postworks with Jacob, was to support that verisimilitude. He used Avid Pro Tools. There’s no stylization, and it was also about the ocean and that feeling of never being far from water. So the sound design was all about placing you in this specific environment.

Where did you do the DI?
We did the color correction with Jack Lewars, also at Technicolor Postworks. He did the final grade on Autodesk Flame. We shot digitally but I think the film looks very filmic. They did a great job.

Did it turn out the way you first envisioned it?
Pretty much, but it always changes from the script to the screen, and once you bring in your team and all their contributions and the locations and so on, it just expands in every direction. That’s the magic of movies.


Industry insider Iain Blair has been interviewing the biggest directors in Hollywood and around the world for years. He is a regular contributor to Variety and has written for such outlets as Reuters, The Chicago Tribune, The Los Angeles Times and the Boston Globe.

Quick Chat: Wipster’s Rollo Wenlock on Slack integration

By Randi Altman

Cloud-based review and approval tool Wipster, which lets you upload your latest edit, share it with clients and colleagues and have frame-accurate conversations directly on the video, now offers integration with Slack, allowing for realtime team messaging.

Wipster CEO/founder Rollo Wenlock says, “Now you can get your Wipster notifications directly in your team Slack channel, making it super-easy for the whole team to instantly see where a review is at.”

I reached out to Wenlock to find out more about Wipster, the Slack integration and what it means for users.

wipster-slack-comment-streamHow old is Wipster now, and can you describe how it works?
Wipster was born in 2013. Wipster is a content review and approval platform for creative teams and their stakeholders to rapidly iterate video projects by sharing work-in-progress for realtime pin-point comments right on the content. Teams speed up their production by up to 60 percent and get closer creative collaboration with their workmates, thus enhancing the work. We like to say that Wipster is the “Google Docs of video.”

How has the tool evolved over the years?
In the beginning we were very focused on creating a very specific user experience to prove people wanted to share work-in-progress and talk all over it. Wipster only worked for single users, only certain types of video could be uploaded, and at the very start, when comments were made, you had no way of knowing who made them!

Now Wipster works for multiple integrated teams, comments are realtime, with replies, added imagery and social “likes.” All commentary becomes automatic to-do lists, and you can have the whole Wipster experience right inside Adobe Creative Cloud.

What types of pros have been taking advantage of Wipster?
In the early days it was freelancers and small studios working for large agencies and brands. Now we have the large agencies and brands as customers as well. Companies like Red Bull, Delta Airlines and Intel. We have every type of creative team using Wipster every day to enhance their creative work.

There are many review and approval apps out there these days, what makes Wipster different? Is it suited to a particular workflow?
Since our launch there have been a number of other apps launch, some doing a great job, others not quite getting the user experience right. The reason why brands and studios are coming to Wipster is our relentless focus on making the review experience work seamlessly between the creative and the stakeholder.

Oftentimes, these people have never worked together before, and creating a very easy and memorable experience heightens their relationship. For our customers, Wipster is a new way of working, which takes them 100x beyond the process they had before, which usually involved a disconnected collection of social video apps and email.

Can you talk about your Slack integration? What does it offer users that they didn’t have before? How does it enhance the process?
We talk to our customers every day, multiple times a day — and they tell us about all the apps and workflows they already have, and what they would like them to do with Wipster — which is insanely helpful.

Our customers want to use Wipster as their “pre-publish” platform, and anything we can do to make their lives simpler and more enjoyable is top of our list. Thousands of our users are working in Slack every day, so it was a no-brainer that we create a Wipster activity channel for them to access right inside Slack.

When using Slack and Wipster together, you can access all your Wipster activity right inside a Slack channel in realtime. This means people in your team can see when videos have been uploaded and shared. You can see when teammates and clients have viewed work, and made comments. You can even see what frame of the video they commented on, with a green dot showing you where they had clicked. This workflow is just another way we are rapidly speeding up the process in which creatives and stakeholders can work together.

Main Photo Caption: Rollo Wenlock (far right) and the Wipster team.

G-Tech 6-15

Quick Chat: Emery Wells discusses Frame.io for Adobe After Effects

By Randi Altman

Frame.io is a cloud-based video collaboration tool that was designed to combine the varied ways pros review and approve projects — think Dropbox, Vimeo or email. Frame.io allows you to create projects and add collaborators and files to share in realtime.

They are now offering integration with Adobe’s After Effects that includes features like realtime comments and annotations that sync to your comp, the ability to import comments and annotations into your comp as live shape layers, and uploads of project files and bins.

To find out more, I reached out to Frame.io’s co-founder/CEO Emery Wells.

You just launched a panel for Adobe After Effects. Why was this the next product you guys targeted?
We launched our first Adobe integration with Premiere Pro this past NAB. It was a huge amount of work to rebuild all the Frame.io collaboration features for the Adobe Extension architecture, but it was worth the effort. The response from the Premiere integration was one of the best and biggest we received. After Effects is Premiere’s best friend. It’s the workhorse of the post industry. From complex motion graphics and visual effects to simple comps and title sequences, After Effects is one the key tools video pros rely on so we knew we had to extend all of the capabilities into AE.

Can you discuss the benefits users get from this panel?
Workflow is often one of the biggest frustrations any post pro faces. You really just want to focus on making cool stuff, but inevitably that requires wrangling renders, uploading files everywhere, collecting feedback and generally just doing a bunch of stuff that has nothing to do what you’re good at and what you enjoy. Frame.io for Adobe After Effects allows you to focus on the work you do well in the tool you use to do it. When you need to get feedback from someone, just upload your comp to Frame.io from within AE. Those people will immediately get a notification via email or their phone and they can start leaving feedback immediately. That feedback then flows right back into your comp where you’re doing the work.

We just cut out all the inefficient steps in between. What it really provides, more than anything else, is rapid iteration. The absolute best work only comes through that creative iteration. We never nail something on our first try. It’s the 10th try, the 50th try. Being able to try things quickly and get feedback quickly not only saves time and money, but will actually produce better work.

Will there be more Adobe collaboration offerings to come?
The way we built the panel for Premiere and After Effects actually uses the entire Frame.io web application codebase. It essentially just has a different skin on it so it feels native to Adobe apps. What that essentially means is all the updates we do to the core web application get inherited by Premiere and After Effects, so there will be many more features to come.

Not long ago Frame.io got a huge infusion of cash thanks to some heavy-hitter investors. How has this changed the way you guys work?
It’s allowing us to move faster and in parallel. We’ve now shipped four really unique products in about a year and half. The core web app, the Apple Design award-winning iOS app, the full experiences that live inside Premiere and AE, and our desktop companion app that integrated with Final Cut Pro X. All these products require considerable resources to maintain and push forward, so the capital infusion will allow us to continue building a complete ecosystem of apps that all work together to solve the most essential creative collaboration challenges.

What’s next for Frame.io?
The integrations are a really key part of our strategy, and you’ll see more of them moving forward. We want to embed Frame.io as deeply as we can in the creative apps so it just becomes a seamless part of your experience.

Check out this video for more:


Hands of Stone DP and colorist weigh in on film’s look and feel

By Randi Altman

“No mas! No mas!” Those famous words were uttered in desperation by legendary fighter Roberto Durán, putting an end to his rematch with Sugar Ray Leonard. But before that, Durán had impressively defeated the charismatic Sugar Ray, capturing the WBC welterweight title. Durán’s story — along with that of his trainer Ray Arcel — was recently told in The Weinstein Company’s feature Hands of Stone.

Written and directed by Jonathan Jakubowicz, the film’s DP was Miguel Ioan Littin Menz. He worked very closely with director Jakubowicz and FotoKem colorist Kostas Theodosiou to develop several different looks for the film, including for the different decades in which the story takes place, boxing versus training scenes in different locations (New York, Panama, Las Vegas) and flashback scenes.

Robert De Niro and Edgar Ramírez star in HANDS OF STONEThe film stars Édgar Ramírez as Duran, Usher Raymond as Sugar Ray and Robert DeNiro as Ray Arcel.

We were lucky enough to get some time from both Littin Menz and Theodosiou, albeit separately, for questions. First we caught up with Theodosiou.
Enjoy.

How early did you get involved with the film?
Theodosiou: Prior to my involvement in the project, FotoKem’s nextLAB was on location and involved in dailies acquisition and management. However, I started working with the filmmakers at the editorial stage, after the shoot was finished.

What kind of overall look/looks did the director and DP have in mind for the film, and how did they share that vision with you?
Theodosiou: Both the director Jonathan Jakubowicz and the director of photography Miguel Ioan Litten Menz were very hands-on. They supervised each session to make sure we created looks that best suited all the different time periods, as well as the variety of locations used in the production. The story involved multiple locations, including Panama, New York and Las Vegas.

Nearly every scene was shot on location to maintain authenticity, and it was important that we were true to the look and feel of each location. Jonathan and Miguel explained in detail what they wanted to achieve visually, so we created a unique look for each location.

kostas

Kostas Theodosiou

In addition, the story took us through many different time periods that spanned Roberto Duran’s life — from childhood through his entire career. Each time period also required a different treatment to establish its place in time. Every look we created had a purpose and is in the film for a reason. As a result, there are many different looks in this movie, but they all worked together to help tell the story.

You called on Resolve for this film. Can you talk about the tool and how it helps you in your work?
Theodosiou: Resolve is a great platform and allowed me to mix footage that was shot using a variety of different cameras, lenses and aspect ratios. The tools in Resolve helped me blend the footage seamlessly to enhance the filmmakers’ vision, and the results surpassed their expectations.

You mentioned that both the director and DP were in the room with you?
Theodosiou: Yes, Miguel and Jonathan were supervising the color correction from beginning to end. We all had great chemistry and worked together as a team. This was Jonathan’s passion project and he was very invested in the film, so he was deeply involved in the finishing process. And Miguel flew in from Chile to make sure he was here with us.

In the final stages of making the film, additional scenes were added and both filmmakers returned to FotoKem to work with me to make sure the new extended scenes fit in with the mood they were trying to portray. It was a very hands-on experience.

Now let’s hear from DP Miguel Ioan Litten Menz:

What were your first meetings like with Kostas?
Littin Menz: I was very pleased to hear that the color correction was to be done at FotoKem in Los Angeles. We chose Kostas because of his background — he’s worked for Paul Thomas Anderson; Robert Elswit, ASC; Christopher Nolan; and Hoyte van Hoytema, ASC. Since the first meeting, the connection and conversation about aesthetic was immediately understood. Our ideas and feelings about how to adjust the palette of colors for the final look of the film were in sync. He did marvelous work.

director-and-dp

Jonathan Jakubowicz and Miguel Ioan Littin Menz.

What was the general overall look the director had in mind for the film and how did he communicate that to you?
Littin Menz: In general, Jonathan talked about creating different looks between Panama and New York, and at the same time creating a look where you can feel an epic and intimate story at the same time. We want the audience to feel the wild, powerful and sensual colors around Roberto Durán’s life in Panama, and more plain, elegant and sober colors around Ray Arcel’s life in New York. In our research, we looked at thousands of photographs from sports magazines from that period, and also many documentaries.

And for my personal research, I again read Norman Mailer’s book “The Fight” and Jack London’s “The Mexican.”

How would you describe the different looks and feel of the film — decade by decade, location by location?
Littin Menz: I worked very closely with Tomás Voth, the production designer, who did amazing work. We described two very different worlds — Duran’s life in Panama and Ray Arcel’s in New York — so as a general concept we tried to create eclectic and powerful palates of colors for Duran’s life, to mimic his real personality.

For Ray Arcel, we used colors that were more serene and elegant, like he was throughout his entire life. Sometimes I used warm colors to evoke nostalgic times for Ray Arcel, and sometimes cool colors appeared in the sad times for both Duran and Arcel. Decade by decade, from the ‘60s to the ‘80s, we created different looks for timeline reasons but also as part of the intimate space for each character.

What cameras did you use, and why did you opt for three different ones? How did that affect the look and the grade?
Littin Menz: We relied on two Alexa XTs, one Alexa M and three Blackmagic cameras for VFX purposes. One of the Alexas, the B camera, was always prepared for the Steadicam. The C camera and the Alexa M were used for the fights. Also, we used Anamorphic Hawk V Lite Lenses. Kostas was thorough in making sure everything from the different shoots matched.

Can you talk about the shoot? Was there a DIT? If so, what role did they play? And what kind of on-set monitors were you using?
Littin Menz: The DIT was there mostly for making the back-ups and dailies. It was a lot of material every day. We also created LUTs for some scenes. The monitors were Asus VS197D-P 18.5-inch for video assist and a Flanders Scientific for the DIT station.

Was there anything unique or challenging about it that you are particularly proud of?
Littin Menz: On the technical side, it was very challenging to reproduce the big spaces and fights, in places like the Madison Square Garden in New York through three decades, the Olympic Stadium in Montreal and the Superdome in New Orleans, but I think we did it successfully.

Some of my favorite scenes were those of Durán when he was a kid in “El Chorrillo,” the poor neighborhood where he lived. We never forgot that the principal idea for the film was to tell the story through the clear and transparent eyes of that child — the story of a child who came from one of poorest neighborhoods of Latin America and became a world champion. I’m very proud to have been a part of this project.


Collaboration app from Frame.io available for iPhone

Frame.io, which seems to be releasing new features and tools almost monthly, has developed an iPhone app for video review and collaboration. The all-new iOS app gives editors, producers, artists and filmmakers the ability to share, review and collaborate on videos wherever they are.

Frame.io for iOS includes: time-based comments and video annotations so you can draw directly on video frames to accurately communicate your feedback; video transcoding in the cloud so you can upload any video format and not have to worry about playback compatibility; version control so you can see what your video looked like one version ago or 100 versions ago; Comment Replay, which loops a four-second range around any comment so you can get a sense of what it means in context; TouchScrub, allowing users to slide their finger over a thumbnail to preview; and Touch ID for added security.

“We spent eight months perfecting the Frame.io experience for iPhone”, says Frame.io CEO, Emery Wells. “The old way of working with email and 10 different file sharing and video review services just wasn’t cutting it. We first solved that problem on the web and now with Frame.io for iOS we’ve made the entire video review and collaboration experience accessible from anywhere.”

We reached out to Frame.io’s Emery Wells to find out more about the app. First we asked, why the eight-month timeframe for building the app?

“Doing an iOS app from scratch is a big undertaking. We wanted it to be 100 percent native. We didn’t choose to reuse any code, we didn’t rewrap the web application. This allowed us to take advantage of all the latest features available in iOS like Touch ID and 3D Touch,” he explains. “We completely redesigned three or four times before arriving at the final design. Simultaneously to designing, we started coding all the really essential parts of the app. The stuff we know we’ll need even if we go through another drastic design change. We kept working like this until we came up with two to three magic moments. When we impress ourselves then we know we’re ready to start thinking about shipping.

Wells believes the magic moments in this first release were these three key things:
1.  Pull down collaborator animation. This is really custom UI/UX and animation.
2. TouchScrub with Peek and Pop support. “The first time we got TouchScrub working everyone was giddy,” he says. “There is something so satisfying about scrubbing your finger over a clip to get a quick preview. Peek and Pop support was icing on the cake.”

3. Comment Replay. This was an idea Wells came up with when they were working on their Premiere launch video. “Team members were leaving notes for me like, ‘Needs to come in on the beat.’ I’d be reading these notes on our yet-unreleased iPhone app and it would be really hard to experience that little moment where the note was left. I wanted to loop that little range a few times to a get a sense of what he meant and understand the comment in context. We came up with the idea of Comment Replay, which loops four seconds around any comment. It’s insanely useful.”

We also asked Wells if plans for a non-iOS mobile device was in his future. “We started with iOS probably because most of our team is iOS-centric. We all have iPhones and Macs. It’s not a religious decision. Android is great and hopefully at some point in the future we’ll see Frame.io on Android but our expertise and familiarity was more in line with iOS.”

Also available in French and German, the Frame.io iOS app can be downloaded now from the App Store. Check out their product video…

NAB 1/17

NAB: Critique upped to version 4, using AWS for cloud

From the minds at LA-based post house DigitalFilm Tree comes a new version of Critique, its cloud-collaboration software. Critique, which is now in v.4, is already used on shows such as Modern Family, The Simpsons and NCIS: Los Angeles. In addition to many new features and security controls in Critique 4, this is the first time the app has been deployed on AWS.

Critique’s new relationship with AWS is key to version 4, says Guillaume Aubuchon, CIO of Critique. “AWS is not only the largest cloud provider, but they are the cloud provider of choice in the M&E space. Our infrastructure shift to AWS afforded us the ability to architect the software to leverage the range of services in the AWS cloud platform. It allowed us to build Critique 4 from scratch in a matter of mere months.”

Critique 4 is a secure digital media asset management (MAM) platform with extensive features to support creative processes and production workflow for both the media and entertainment space as well as enterprise. Built to be extremely easy to use, Critique facilitates collaboration through realtime chat, live annotations, and secure sharing over the Internet to deliver productions on time and on budget. Realtime chat and drawing annotations are viewable across the Web and iOS — they also work with the new Apple Pencil for iPad Pro.

Designed to improve workflow, the software facilitates every step from protected dailies screening to VFX workflows to post to distribution while capitalizing on enterprise-level security to protect valuable assets.

Critique 4 was born of the minds of its executive team of Aubuchon, a veteran in the production space having worked on such projects such as Her, NCIS:LA and Angie Tribeca, and Chris Chen, an expert in the production streaming space and the former CTO of DAX. With its ability to use its own DigitalFilm Tree as a beta test site, Critique is built to ensure it works in real-world media environments.

One of the new exciting features of Critique 4 is its ability to index Amazon Simple Storage Service (Amazon S3) to allow companies to manage their own content inside of Critique’s award-winning interface. It also offers high-performance cloud MAM for simultaneous video and document management: Users can collaborate with Critique’s review, approval and annotation workflows not only for video but also for production documents including scripts, graphics and still images.

“Digital Rights Management (DRM) protection is rarely used, if at all, for unreleased content, which is arguably where it is needed the most,” notes Chen. “Critique was designed to leverage DRM invisibly throughout its video distribution system on desktop, web, and mobile environments. This allows Critique to break through the legacy walled-garden approach, allowing a new level of flexibility in collaboration while maintaining security. But we do it in such a way that the users don’t even know it’s there.”

The ability to share assets in this way expands its mobility and Critique is available via web, phones, tablets and Apple TV. The video service is backed by a true CDN running multi-bit-rate video to prevent glitches on any platform. “Users can take advantage of Critique anywhere — in their office, living room, the subway or even on a plane,” explains Chen. “And it will be true to the original media.

Other highlights of Critique 4 include: storage, archiving and management of Raw material; automatic transcoding of Raw material into a proxy format for viewing; granular permissions on files, folders, and projects; easy-to-manage sharing functions for users outside the system with the ability to time-limit and revoke/extend individual permissions; customizable watermarking on videos.

While Critique was born in the creative and operations side of the media and entertainment market, it is extending to enterprise, small to medium-size businesses, publishing, education and government/military sectors.

This latest version of Critique is available now for a free 30-day trial (AWS usage fees apply). Pricing is extremely competitive with 10, 20, 50 and 100 user levels starting as low as $39 per user. Enterprise level contracts are available for larger projects and companies with multiple projects. The fee includes unlimited streaming of current content and 24/7 white-glove tech support. AppleTV, Apple iPad and iPhone apps are also included. For a nominal fee, users can add DRM, high-resolution cloud transcode and storage for camera raw and mezzanine files.

NAB 1/17

NAB: Square Box’s CatDV MAM embraces the S3 cloud

Square Box Systems, makers of the CatDV media asset management (MAM) system, will be at NAB 2016 with their new CatDV Archive to S3 Cloud. Developed in response to customers’ requests to leverage cloud services in their CatDV MAM operations, this new integration enables archiving of CatDV-managed media assets and associated metadata in Amazon Simple Storage Service (S3), the cloud-based file-storage service offered by Amazon Web Services.

CatDV helps teams of artists organize, communicate and collaborate in organizations that create or manage a large volume of digital media. CatDV can be used flexibly, from single-user installations to large dispersed teams in global operations.

With CatDV Archive to S3 Cloud providing a direct link to S3 from CatDV’s Web and desktop user interfaces, users are able to copy content directly to Amazon S3 object storage or archive files to clear space on their local storage drives — all while preserving the assets’ metadata and tagging. Users can view the status of the service and the job queue at any time during a CatDV Archive to S3 Cloud operation.

According to the company the product targets production, post production and repurposing of finished media assets.


Frame.io’s Emery Wells talks about Premiere Pro collaboration

In this business, collaboration is key. And without a strong system in place, chaos ensues, things get missed and time and money is wasted. The makers of Frame.io, a video review, sharing and collaboration platform, know that first hand, having been hands-on post pros. Recently, they came out with a realtime tool for Adobe Premiere Pro, aptly named Frame.io for Premiere Pro. The product includes the entire Frame.io application, redesigned and re-engineered for Adobe’s panel architecture.

This product, they say, is based on decades of real-world experience sitting in an editor’s chair. Features of the product include a shared cloud bin that multiple editors can work from; one click import and export of sequences, project files and entire bins; realtime comments directly in the Premiere timeline with no marker syncing; auto versioning for rapid iteration on creative ideas; comment marker syncing for when you do not have an internet connection; and sync’d playback in Frame.io and your Premiere timeline.

To find out more, we reached out to Frame.io co-founder and CTO Emery Wells (right) to find out more.

With this latest offering, you target a specific product. Does this mean you will be customizing your tool for specific editing platforms going forward?
Frame.io is a web application that can be accessed from any browser. It is not NLE specific and you can upload media that’s come from anywhere. We’ve started to build (and will continue to build) tools that help bridge the gap between the creative desktop apps like Premiere and Frame.io. Each tool we integrate comes with its own unique set of challenges and capabilities. Premiere’s extension model was compatible with Frame.io’s architecture so we were able to bring the entire feature set directly inside Premiere.

How is this product different from others out there?
It’s much more significant than an integration. It’s an entire realtime collaboration layer for Adobe Premiere and is transformative to the way video gets made. The Premiere integration has already been in the hands of companies like BuzzFeed, where they have 200 producers cranking out 175 videos/week. That is an absolutely maddening pace. Frame.io and our latest Premiere integration brings efficiency to that process.

Can multiple editors work simultaneously, like Avid?
No. It’s not a replacement for an Avid set-up like that.

What are the costs?
The Premiere extension comes standard with any Frame.io plan, including our free plan.

What speed of Internet is required?
We recommend a minimum of 10 megabits per second, which is fairly accessible on any broadband connection these days.

How easy to use is it, really?
It’s as easy as the Frame.io web application itself. Anyone can get up to speed in 10-15 minutes of poking around.

What do you think is the most important thing users should know about this product?
We’re solving real problems based on real experience. We built the tool we wanted as editors ourselves. Frame.io for Premiere Pro really allows you to go home at a decent hour instead of waiting around for a render at 10pm. We automate the render, upload and notification. You don’t have to pull your hair out trying to stay organized just to move a project forward.