Category Archives: Cameras

Jaunt One pro VR camera available for rent from AbelCine

Thanks to an expanding rental plan, the Jaunt One cinematic VR camera is being made available through AbelCine, a provider of products and services to the production, broadcast and new media industries. AbleCine has locations in New York, Chicago and Los Angeles.

The Jaunt One 24G model camera — which features 24 global shutter sensors, is suited for low-light and fast-moving objects, and has the ability to couple with 360-degree ambisonic audio recording — will be available to rent from AbelCine. Creators will also have access to AbelCine’s training, workshops and educational tools for shooting in VR.

The nationwide availability of the Jaunt One camera, paired with access to the company’s end-to-end VR pipeline, provides filmmakers, creators and artists with the hardware and software (through Jaunt Cloud Services) solutions for shooting, producing and distributing immersive cinematic VR experiences (creators can submit high-quality VR content for distribution directly to the Jaunt VR app through the Jaunt Publishing program).

“As we continue to open the Jaunt pipeline to the expanding community of VR creators, AbelCine is a perfect partner to not only get the Jaunt One camera in the hands of filmmakers, but also to educate them on the opportunities in VR,” says Koji Gardiner, VP of hardware engineering at Jaunt. “Whether they’re a frequent experimenter of new mediums or a proven filmmaker dabbling in VR for the first time, we want to equip creators of all backgrounds with everything needed to bring their stories to life.”

Jaunt is also expanding its existing rental program with LA-based Radiant Images to increase the number of cameras available to their customers.

 

Digging Deep: Sony intros the PXW-FS7 II camera

By Daniel Rodriguez

At a press event in New York City a couple of weeks ago, Sony unveiled the long-rumored follow-up to its extremely successful Sony PXW FS7 — the Sony PXW-FS7 II. With the new FS7 II, Sony dives deeper in the mid-level cinematographer/ videographer market that it firmly established with the FS100, FS700, FS7 and the more recent Sony FS5.

Knowing they are competing with cameras of other similarly priced brands, Sony has built upon a line that fulfills most technical and ergonomic needs. Sony prides itself on listening to videographers and cinematographers who make requests and suggestions from first-hand field experience, and it’s clear that they’ve continued to listen.

New Features
The Sony FS7 II might be the first camera where you can feel the deep care and consideration from Sony for those who have used the FS7 extensively, in regards to improvements. Although the body and overall design might seem nearly identical to the original FS7, the FS7 II has made subtle but important ergonomic improvements to the camera’s design.

Improving on their E-mount design, Sony has introduced a lever locking mechanism much how a PL mount functions. Unlike the PL mount, the new lever lock rotates counter-clockwise but provides a massive amount of support, especially since there is a secondary latch that prevents you from accidentally turning the lever back. The mount has been tested to support the same weight as traditional PL mounts, and larger cinema zooms can be easily mounted without the need of a lens support. Due to its short flange distance, Sony’s E-mount has become very popular with users for adapting almost all stills and cinema lenses to Sony cameras, and with this added support there is reduced risk and concern when adding lens adapters.

The camera body’s corners and edges have all been rounded out, allowing users to have a much more comfortable control of the camera. This is especially helpful for handheld use when the camera might be pressed up against someone’s body or under their arm. Considering things like operating below the underarm and at the waist, Sony has redesigned the arm grip, and most of the body, to be tool-less. The arm grip no longer requires tools to be adjusted and now uses two knobs to allow easy adjustments. This saves much needed time and maximizes comfort.

The viewfinder can now be extended further in either direction with a longer rod, which benefits left-eye dominant operators. The microphone holder is no longer permanently attached to the other side of the rod so it can either be adapted to the left side of camera to allow viewing the monitor to the right of the camera or it could be removed altogether. Sony has also made the viewfinder collapsible for those who’d rather just view the monitor. The viewfinder rod is now square shaped to allow uniform horizontal aligning in the framing in relation to the cameras balancing. This stemmed from operators confusing their framing by believing framing was crooked due to how the viewfinder was aligned, even if the camera was perfectly balanced.

Sony really kept the smaller suggestions in mind by making the memory card slots protrude more than on the original FS7. This allows for loaders to more easily access the memory card should they be wearing something that inhibits their grip, like gloves. Compatibility with the newer G-series XQD cards, which boast an impressive 440MBps write and 400MBps read speed, allowing FS7 II users to quickly dump their footage on the field without the worry of running out of useable memory cards.

Coming straight out the box is the FS7 II’s ability to do internal 4K DCI (4096×2160) without the need for upgrades or HDMI output. This 4K can be captured in nearly every codec, whether in XAVC, ProRes 422HQ, or RAW, with the option of HyperGammas, Slog-3 or basic 709. RAW output will be available to the camera, but like its siblings, an external recorder will still be required to do so. The FS7 II will also be capable of recording Sony’s version of compressed RAW, XOCN, which allows 16-bit 3:1 recording to an external recorder. Custom 3D LUTs will still be available to be uploaded into the camera. This allows more of a cinematographer’s touch when using a custom LUT, rather than factory presets.

Electronic Internal Variable ND
The most exciting feature of the Sony FS7 II — and the one that really separates this camera from the FS7 — is the introduction of an Electronic Internal Variable ND. Introduced originally in the FS5, the new options that the FS7 II has over the FS5 with this new Electronic Variable ND makes this a very promising camera and an improvement over its older sibling.

Oftentimes with similarly priced cameras, or ones that offer the same options, there is either a lack of internal NDs or a limited amount of internal ND control, which is either too much or not enough when it comes to exposure control. The term Variable ND is also approached with caution from videographers/cinematographers with concerns of color shifts and infrared pollution, but Sony has taken care of these precautions by having an IR cut filter over the sensor. This way, no level of ND will introduce any color shifts or infrared pollution. It’s also often easy to break the bank buying IR NDs to prevent infrared pollution, and the constant swapping of ND filters might prove a disadvantage when it comes to being time-efficient, which could also lead you to open or close your F-stop to compensate.

Compromising your F-stop is often an unfortunate reality when shooting — indoors or outdoors — and it’s extremely exciting to have a feature that allows you to adjust your exposure flawlessly without worrying about having the right ND level or adjusting your F-stop to compensate. It’s also exciting to know that you can adjust the ND filter without having to see a literal filter rotate in front of your image. The Electronic Variable ND can be adjusted from the grip as well, so you can essentially ride the iris without having to touch your F-stop and risk your depth of field being inconsistent.

closeup-settingsAs with most modern-day lenses that lack manual exposure, riding the iris is simply out of the question due to mechanical “clicked” irises and the very obvious exposure shift when changing the F-stop on one of these lenses. This is eliminated by letting the Variable ND do all the work and allowing you to leave your F-stop untouched. The Electronic Variable ND on manual mode allows you to smoothly transition between 0.6ND to 2.1ND in one-third increments.

Recording in BT
Another exciting new addition to the FS7 II is the ability to record in BT. 2020 (more commonly known as Rec. 2020) internally in UHD. While this might seem excessive to some, considering this camera is still a step below its siblings the F55 and F65 as far as use in productions where HDR deliverables are required, providing the option to shoot Rec. 2020 futureproofs this camera for years to come especially when Rec. 2020 monitoring and projection becomes the norm. Companies like Netflix usually request an HDR deliverable for their original programs so despite the FS7 II not being on the same level as the F55/F65, it shows it can deliver the same level of quality.

While the camera can’t boast a global shutter like its bigger sibling, the F55, the FS7 does show very capable rolling shutter with little to no skewing effects. In the FS7 II’s case it is preferable to retain rolling shutter over global because as a camera that leans slightly toward the commercial/videography spectrum of cinematography, it is preferable to retain a native ISO of 2000 and the full 14 stops over global shutter, which is easy to overlook and use cost much-needed dynamic range.

This exclusion of global shutter retains the native ISO of the FS7II at 2000 ISO, which is the same as the previous FS7. Retaining this native ISO puts the FS7 II above many similar priced video cameras whose native ISOs usually sit at 800. While the FS7 II may not be a low-light beast like the Sony a7s/a7sii, the ability to do internal 4K DCI, higher frame rates and record 10-bit 422HQ (and even RAW) greatly outweigh this loss in exposure.

The SELP18110G 18-110 F4.0 Servo Zoom
Alongside the Sony FS7 II, Sony has announced a new zoom lens to be released alongside the camera. Building off what they have introduced before with the Sony FE PZ 28-135 F4 G, the 18-110 F4 is a very powerful lens optically and the perfect companion to the FS7 II. The lens is sharp to the edges; doesn’t drop focus while zooming in and out; has no breathing whatsoever; has a quiet internal zoom, iris, and focus control; internal stabilization; and a 90-second zoom crawl from end to end. The lens covers Super 35mm and APSC-sized sensors and retains a constant f4 throughout each focal length.

It’s multi-coating allows for high contrast and low flaring with circular bokeh to give truly cinematic images. Despite its size, the lens only weighs 2.4 pounds, a weight easily supported by the FS7 II’s lever-locking E mount. Though it isn’t an extremely fast lens, paired with a camera like the FS7 II, which has a native ISO of 2000, the 18-110 F4 should prove to be a very useable lens on the field and as well in narrative work.

Final Impressions
This camera is very specifically designed for camerapersons who either have a very small camera team or shoot as individuals. Many of the new features, big and small, are great additions for making any project go down smoothly and nearly effortlessly. While its bigger siblings the F55 and F65 will still dominate major motion picture production and commercial work, this camera has all its corners covered to fill the freelance videographer/cinematographer’s needs.

Indie films, short films, smaller commercial and videography work will no doubt find this camera to be hugely beneficial and give as few headaches as possible. Speed and efficiency are often the biggest advantage on smaller productions and this camera easily handles and facilitates the most overlooked aspects of video production.

The specs are hard to pass up when discussing the Sony FS7 II. Hearing of a camera that does internal 4K DCI with the option of high frame rates at 10-bit 422HQ with 14 stops of dynamic range and the option to shoot in Slog3 or one of the many HyperGammas for faster deliverables should immediately excite any videographer/cinematographer. Many cinematographers making feature or short films have grown accustomed to shooting RAW, and unless they rent the external recorder, or buy it, they will be unable to do so with this camera. But with the high write speeds of the internal codecs, it’s difficult to argue that, despite a few minor features being lost, the internal video will retain a massive amount of information.

This camera truly delivers on providing nearly any ergonomic and technical need, and by anticipating future display formats with Rec.2020, this shows that Sony is very conscious of future-proofing this camera. The physical improvements on the camera have shown that Sony is very open and eager to hear suggestions and first-hand experiences from FS7 users, and no doubt any suggestions on the FS7 II will be taken into mind.

The Electronic Variable ND is easily the best feature of the camera since so much time in the field will be saved by not having to swap NDs, and the ability to shift through increments between the standard ND levels will be hugely beneficial to get your exposure right. Being able to adjust exposure mid shot without having filters come between the image will be a great feature to those shooting outdoors or working events where the lighting is uneven. Speed cannot be emphasized enough, and by having such a massively advantageous feature you are just cutting more and more time from whatever production you’re working.

Pairing up the camera with the new 18-110 F4 will make a great camera package for location shooting since you will be covered for nearly every focal length and have a sharp lens that has servo zooming, internal stabilization and low flaring. The lens might be off-putting to some narrative filmmakers, since it only opens to a F4.0 and isn’t fast by other lens standards, but with the quality and attention to optic performance the lens should be considered seriously alongside other lenses that aren’t quite cinema lenses but have been used heavily so far in the narrative world. With the native ISO of 2000, one should be able to shoot comfortably wide open or closed down with proper lighting and for films done mostly in natural light this lens should be highly considered.

Oftentimes when choosing a camera, the biggest question isn’t what the camera has but what it will cost. Since Sony isn’t discontinuing the original FS7, the FS7 II will be more expensive, and when considering BP-U60 batteries and XQD cards the price will only climb. I think despite these shortcomings, one must always consider the price of storage and power when upgrading your camera system. More powerful cameras will no doubt require faster cards and bigger power supplies, so these costs must be seen as investments.

While XQD cards might be considered pricey to some, especially those who are more familiar with buying and using SD cards, I consider jumping into the XQD card world a necessary step to develop your video capabilities. CFast cards are becoming the norm in higher-end digital cinema, especially when the FS7 II is being heavily considered.

Compromise is often expected in any level of production, be it technically, logistically or artistically. After getting an impression of what the FS7 II can provide and facilitate in any production scenario I feel this is one of the few cameras that will take away feelings of compromise from what you as a user can provide.

The FS7 II will be available in January 2017 for an estimated street price of $10,000 (body only) and $13,000 for the camcorder with 18-110mm power zoom lens kit.


Daniel Rodriguez is cinematographer and photographer living in New York City. Check out his work here. Dan took many of the pictures featured in this article.

G-Tech 6-15

Red shipping Epic-W and new Weapon cameras

Red Digital Cinema is shipping two new cameras — the Red Epic-W and the newest Weapon. Both feature the compact design of the DSMC2 form factor, as well as the new Helium 8K S35 sensor. Helium, Red’s latest sensor technology, allows for higher resolution in an S35 frame while maintaining the dynamic range found in the Red Dragon sensor.

The Epic-W 8K S35 captures 8K full-frame motion at up to 30fps, produces ultra-detailed 35.4 megapixel stills and offers Super 35 lens coverage. Epic-W is capable of data speeds up to 275 MB/s and is priced at $29,500 (for the camera Brain).

red_weapon_8k_s35The Weapon 8K S35 is the latest option in the Weapon line of cameras, featuring data speeds up to 300MB/s, the ability to capture 8K full frame motion at up to 60fps, and a sensor upgrade path to the Red Dragon 8K VV. It is available for the same price as the Weapon 6K with Red Dragon sensor, at $49,500 for the Brain.

“From the very beginning, we’ve strived to not only develop the best imaging technology on the planet, but also make it available to as many shooters as possible,” Says Jarred Land, President of Red Digital Cinema. “The Weapon remains our premier camera… and now comes with the option to either go with the 8K Helium sensor or 6K Dragon sensor.

Red is offering special pricing on these new cameras for registered Red camera owners — as well as those that have placed a deposit for Red Raven and Scarlet-W — starting at $14,500 for the Epic-W. Click here for more info.

In related news, Red has pre-announced that it will introduce an improved image processing pipeline, including new color science, in the coming weeks. These improvements will be available in-camera on all Brains with a Helium sensor, and will be available to all footage shot on Redcameras in post production. The new image processing pipeline will be made available soon via free firmware and software upgrades.

All of Red’s DSMC2 cameras shoot simultaneous RedCode RAW and Apple ProRes or Avid DNxHD/HR.


Nat Geo’s Bertie Gregory shares tips for managing video in the field

Bertie Gregory may be only 22 years old, but he’s already worked at National Geographic magazine, won the 2015 Young Wildlife Photographer of the Year award and is filming Nat Geo WILD’s first online natural history series.

The show, called wild_life, launched on August 3. Each episode finds Gregory (@BertieGPhoto) seeking out wildlife — salmon, black bears, wolves, etc. — to capture with his cameras. We asked this very busy young Englishman about how he manages his workflow during his 18- to 20-hour days in the field.

Here are Gregory’s Top 5 tips:
1) Have a Backup Plan
Before you set foot in the field, find a data backup system that works for you and stick to it. You’re not always going to be at your best when you’re transferring data from one location to another, and you don’t want to make a mistake. Take time before filming to run through your backup procedures so that there are no surprises.

When downloading from my camera, I always make three copies — one to be stored in a separate geographic location and the other two on me. With file sizes being as large as they are now, having a good workflow in place is absolutely essential. I can aspire to be the best tracker or camera operator, but if we don’t have everything dialed in on the back end, then none of that matters.

2) Choose Reliable Equipment
There are many storage manufacturers competing in the market right now, which has been great for consumers, but be sure that you’re choosing equipment not only based on its price, but also its reliability and durability. There’s plenty of bargain-basement hardware out there that might cost a fraction of their higher-quality counterparts, but they’re likely to let you down exactly at the wrong time.

Between being stuffed in a backpack and overzealous airport baggage handlers, my equipment can really take a beating, so I tend to invest in equipment that might be a bit more expensive initially, but will easily save me significant amounts of time, money and effort over the long-term.

My equipment list:
Cameras:
– Red Dragon
– Canon C300
– Sony FS7
– Multiple GoPros
Computer:
– MacBook Pro

Storage:
– 20TB LaCie 5big Thunderbolt 2
– Multiple 4TB LaCie Rugged RAID drives

3) Choose Speed
I shoot a lot of footage — more than 500 GB on some days — and there’s nothing more soul-crushing than wrapping up 15 hours of filming and realizing that you still have hours of work ahead of you just to back up your data. When I get finished with a day’s shooting, all I want to do is get horizontal as fast as possible. That means I need fast transfer speeds. Look for backup storage devices that use Thunderbolt or USB 3.0 interfaces, and which also incorporate RAID technology to improve both speed and reliability.

4) Get Rid of Distractions
Making one mistake can ruin an entire day’s worth of time, money and effort when you’re backing up your footage. When I’m downloading, I do it in a quiet location without distractions. Just like with everything else in life, you’re going to do a better, quicker job if you have your full attention on the task at hand. Admittedly, this is easier to do in the wilds of Canada than in an office somewhere, but quiet places do exist, even in the modern office.

5) Keep With Your Plan
When you have the right equipment, people and plan in place, you’re ready to go — as long as you keep to that plan. But with the long days, the thankless nature of backing up your data and the strains that being in the field can put on you, it can be very easy at some point down the road to just not keep with the plan.

“Oh, I’ll just do it tomorrow” becomes, “Eh, I can do it this weekend,” which becomes, “Wait, when was the last time I backed up my data?” And while you may get lucky and not suffer a mishap while your data is vulnerable, you’re playing with fire every time you put off backing up your data. Keep to your plan, follow your backup schedule and you won’t ever have to worry.


Check out more on wild_life on Nat Geo Wild.


Triptent intros robotic arm for high-speed cinematography

Triptent has introduced Robic, a custom-developed robotic arm system designed for high-speed cinematography. Robic is a fully programmable camera arm that allows for precise movement up to 105 miles per hour to capture and follow motion in laser-sharp focus at 2,500 frames per second. Robic is available now for productions, exclusively through Triptent, and is compatible with pro cameras, including the Phantom HD, Flex 4K, Red Epic and the Arri Alexa Mini.

“Together with our longtime collaborator, director/technologist/inventor Fernando Kocking, we decided to develop a custom solution allowing our clients a way to create shots that we’ve never been able to capture before in-camera,” explains Joe Masi, founder at Triptent. “With Robic, we can follow the action in realtime — a ballerina on pointe as she leaps into the air, a glass propelled by gravity as it crashes to the ground, the trajectory of a baseball through the air after a hit. Robic is the first rig to offer such laser-focused images even at high speeds. Using Robic’s infrared motion sensors, we can produce motion control shots that don’t require CGI, layering or effects because everything is captured precisely in live action.”

Robic is built around a set of robotic arms developed by world robotics leader Staubli, which were then custom engineered via a software toolset written by Kocking to specifically service high-speed cinematography workflows. Robic can capture not only tabletop and product footage, but also people and objects, enabling new possibilities in sports, performance, automotive, beauty and lifestyle shoots.

The current Robic set-up includes four motion control arms, all fully synchronized to capture a shot with ultimate precision even though it may be a millisecond in time. Two of the robotic arms, together with the custom Robic software, are designed to control cameras, and two are designed to control objects. The camera control arms can be used alone, or can be programmed to follow the movements of an object mounted on another Robic arm for perfectly synced capture. The system has also been designed so that camera arms can be controlled and programmed very simply via a videogame controller, dramatically reducing prep time.

The Robic system is transportable and can be set up on a stage or on location, and is already in use on commercial projects. See it in action:

NAB 1/17

GoPro intros Karma foldable drone, Hero5 with voice-controlled recording

By Brady Betzel

“Hey, GoPro, start recording!” That’s right, voice-controlled recording is here. Does this mean pros can finally start all their GoPros at the same time? More on this in a bit…

I’m one of the lucky few journalists/reviewers who have been brought out to Squaw Valley, California, to hear about GoPro’s latest products first hand — oh, and I got to play with them as well.

So, the long awaited GoPro Karma drone is finally here, but it’s not your ordinary drone. It is small and foldable so it can fit in a backpack, but the three-axis camera stabilizer can be attached to the included Karma grip so you can grab the drone before it lands and carry it or mount it. This is huge! If worked out correctly you can now fake a gigantic jib swing with a GoPro, or even create some ultra-long shots. One of the best parts is that the controller is a videogame style remote that doesn’t require you use your phone or tablet! Thank you GoPro! No, really, thank you.

The Karma is priced at $799, the Karma plus Session is $999, and the Karma plus Hero5 Black is $1,099. And it’s available one day before my birthday next month — hint, hint, nudge, nudge — October 23.

To the Cloud! GoPro Plus and Quik Apps
So you might have been wondering how GoPro intends to build a constant revenue stream. Well, it seems like they are banking on the new GoPro Plus cloud-based subscription service. While your new Hero5 is charging it can auto-upload photos and videos via a computer or phone. In addition you will be able to access, edit and share all from GoPro Plus. For us editing nerds, this is the hot topic because want to edit everything from anywhere.

My question is this: If everyone gets on the GoPro Plus train, are they prepared for the storage and bandwidth requirements? Time will tell. In addition to being able to upload to the cloud with your GoPro Plus subscription, you will have a large music library at your disposal, 20 percent off accessories from GoPro.com, exclusive GoPro Apparel and Premium Support.

The GoPro Subscription breaks down to $4.99 and is available in the US on October 2 — it will be in more markets in January 2017.

Quik App is GoPro’s ambitious attempt at creating an autonomous editing platform. I am really excited about this (even though it basically eliminates the need for an editor — more on this later). While many of you may be hearing about Quik for the first time, it actually has been around for a bit. If you haven’t tried it yet, now is the time. One of the most difficult parts of a GoPro’s end-to-end workflow is the importing, editing and exporting. Now, with GoPro Plus and Quik you will be automatically uploading your Hero5 footage while charging so you can be editing quickly (or Quik-ly. Ha! Sorry, I had to.)

Hero5 Black and Hero5 Session
It’s funny that the Hero5 Black and Session are last on my list. I guess I am kind of putting what got GoPro to the dance last, but last doesn’t in any way mean least!

Hero5 Black

Available on October 2, the Hero5 Black is $399, and includes the following:
● Two-inch touch display with simplified controls.
● Up to 4K video at 30fps
● Auto-upload to GoPro Plus while charging
● Voice Control with support for seven languages, with more to come
● Simplified one-button control
● Waterproof, without housing, to 33 feet
● Compatible with existing mounts, including Karma
● Stereo audio recording
● Video Stabilization built-in
● Fish-eye-free wide-angle video
● RAW and WDR (wide dynamic range) photo modes
● GPS built-in!

Hero5 Session is $299 and offers these features:
● Same small design
● Up to 4K at 30fps
● 10 Megapixel photos
● Auto upload to GoPro Plus while charging
● Voice Control support for seven languages with more to come
● Simplified one-button control
● Waterproof, without housing, to 33 feet
● Compatible with existing mounts, including Karma
● Video Stabilization built in
● Fish-eye-free wide-angle video

Summing Up
GoPro has made power moves. They not only took the original action camera — the Hero — to the next level with upgrades like image stabilization, waterproof without housing, and simplifying the controls in the Hero5 Black and Hero5 Session, they added 4K recording a 30fps and stereo audio recording with Advanced Wind Noise Reduction.

Not only did they upgrade their cameras, GoPro is attempting to revolutionize the drone market with the Karma. The Karma has potential to bring the limelight back to GoPro and steal some thunder from competitors, like DJI, with this foldable and compact drone whose three-axis gimbal can be held by the included Karma handle.

Hero5 Session

Remember that drone teaser video that everyone thought was fake!? Here it is just in case. Looks like that was real and with some pre-planning you can recreate these awesome shots. What’s even more awesome is that later this year GoPro will be launching the “Quik Key,” a micro-USB card reader that plugs into your phone to transfer your videos and photos to your phone, as well as REMO — a voice-activated remote control for the Hero5 (think Apple TV, but for your camera: “GoPro, record video.”

Besides the incredible multimedia products GoPro creates, I really love the family feeling and camaraderie within the GoPro company and athletes they bring in to show off their tools. Coming from the airport to Squaw Valley, I was in the airport shuttle with some mega-pro athletes/content creators like Colin, and they were just as excited as I was.

It was kind of funny because the people who are usually in the projects I edit were next to me geeking out. GoPro has created this amazing, self-contained, ecosphere of content creators and content manipulators that are fan-boys and fan-girls. The energy around the GoPro Karma and Hero5 announcement is incredible, and they’ve created their own ultra-positive culture. I wish I could bottle it up and give it out to everyone reading this news.

Check out some video I shot here.

Brady Betzel is an online editor at Margarita Mix in Hollywood, working on Life Below Zero and Cutthroat Kitchen. You can email Brady at bradybetzel@gmail.com. Earlier this year, Brady was nominated for an Emmy for his work on Disney’s Unforgettable Christmas Celebration.

NAB 1/17

Panasonic and Codex team on VariCam Pure targeting episodic TV, features

At IBC in Amsterdam, Panasonic is showing its new cinema-ready version of the VariCam 35, featuring a jointly-developed Codex recorder capable of uncompressed, 4K RAW acquisition.

The VariCam Pure is the latest addition to the company’s family of pro cinematography products. A co-production between Panasonic and Codex, it couples the existing VariCam 35 camera head with a new Codex V-RAW 2.0 recorder, suited for episodic television shows and feature films.

The V-RAW 2.0 recorder attaches directly to the back of the VariCam 35 camera head. As a result, the camera retains the same Super 35 sensor, 14+ stops of latitude and dual native 800/5000 ISO as the original VariCam 35.

Panasonic VariCam Pure“The new VariCam Pure camera system records pure, uncompressed RAW up to 120 fps onto the industry-standard Codex Capture Drive 2.0 media, already widely used by many camera systems, post facilities and studios,” said Panasonic senior product manager Steven Cooperman. “There is significant demand for uncompressed RAW recording in the high-end market. The modular concept of the VariCam has enabled us to meet this demand. We’ve also listened to feedback from cinematographers and camera operators and ensured that the VariCam Pure is rugged, compact and lightweight, weighing just 11 pounds.”

Codex will provide a dailies and archiving workflow available through its Production Suite. In addition, the Codex Virtual File system means users can transfer many file formats, including Panasonic VRAW, Apple ProRes and Avid DNxHR.

Along with the original camera negative, frame-accurate metadata (such as lens and CDL data) can also be captured, streamlining production and post, and delivering time and cost savings.

The V-RAW 2.0 recorder for VariCam Pure is scheduled for release in December 2016 with a suggested list price of $30,000.


Canon intros C700 camera and two new UHD/4K monitors

Canon has introduced a line of new cinema cameras — the EOS C700, EOS C700 PL and EOS C700 GS PL. Featuring a completely new, customizable, modular design, Canon says the EOS C700 is suited for all types of pro workflows, from feature films to documentaries to episodic dramas. They also have two new reference displays, but more on that later.

The Canon EOS C700 and EOS C700 PL cameras feature a Super 35mm 4.5K sensor with wide dynamic range and can be used for productions requiring 4K UHD TV or 4K DCI cinema deliverables. The EOS C700 GS PL features a Super 35mm 4K sensor with a global shutter to enable the distortion-free capture of subjects moving at high speeds. In addition to supporting the earlier XF-AVC recording format, the cameras also support Apple ProRes.

The EOS C700 allows users to convert between EF mount and PL mounts, and between a standard CMOS image sensor and a global shutter CMOS image sensor at Canon service facilities. The EF lens mount provides compatibility with Canon’s lineup of over 70 interchangeable EF lenses as well as enabling use of Canon’s Dual Pixel CMOS AF technology. The EOS C700 PL and EOS C700 GS PL allow use of industry-standard PL lenses and compatibility with Cooke /i metadata communication technology.

For those wanting to shoot and deliver High Dynamic Range (HDR) content, the EOS C700 and EOS C700 PL provide 15 stops of latitude, Canon’s proprietary Log Gammas (Canon Log3, Canon Log2 and Canon Log) and color science. Additionally, these cameras seamlessly integrate with Canon’s pro 4K displays (DP-V2420, DP-V2410 or DP-V1770) for on-set color management and review that conforms to SMPTE ST 2084 standards of HDR display.

Canon has called on Codex to provide a fully-integrated (no cables) recording and workflow option. The combination of the EOS C700 camera with the optional Codex CDX-36150 recorder allows for high-speed 4.5K RAW recording at up to 100fps, 4K RAW at up to 120fps, 4K ProRes at up to 60fps, 2K ProRes at up to 240fps and XF-AVC at up to 60fps.

The EOS C700, EOS C700 PL and EOS C700 GS PL are the company’s first Cinema EOS cameras to support anamorphic shooting by using a “de-squeeze” function for monitoring, making possible it possible to create images with the 2.39:1 aspect ratio typical of cinema productions. Furthermore, enabling full HD HFR recording at a maximum of 240fps (crop), the camera enables smooth playback, even when slowed down.

Along with the announcement of these cameras, there are new optional accessories: OLED 1920×1080 Electronic View Finder EVF-V70, Remote Operation Unit OU-700, Shoulder Support Unit SU-15, Shoulder Style Grip Unit SG-1 and B4 mount adapters MO-4E/MO-4P.

The EOS C700 and EOS C700 PL are currently expected to go on sale in December 2016, while the EOS C700 GS PL is expected to go on sale in January 2017. The EOS C700 and EOS C700 PL will have a list price of $35K and the EOS C700 GS PL will have a list price of $38K.

New On-Set Monitors
Also from Canon are two new pro 4K/UHD displays targeting content creators — the DP-V2420, a 24-inch high-luminance model targeting HDR footage, and the DP-V1710 4K, a 17-inch, 3840×2160 display suited for use on set, in broadcasting vans and in studios. Both displays feature a Canon-developed image-processing engine, proprietary backlight system and an IPS LCD panel that when combined deliver excellent color reproduction and high-resolution, high-contrast imaging performance.

The Canon DP-V2420 supports HDR standards and display methods increasingly used for next-gen video production, and provides high luminance and black luminance performance essential for screening HDR content. The DP-V2420 display qualifies as a Dolby Vision mastering monitor and complies with the ITU-R BT.2100-0 HDR standard, which specifies a peak luminance 1000 cd/m2 and a minimum luminance 0.005 cd/m2. Allowing for the review and confirmation of high-quality 4K images, the display’s expanded dynamic range increases color expression and the contrast between the light and dark areas of an image to achieve luminance expression close to that of the naked eye while also supporting the expression of natural colors and a sense of three-dimensionality.

The DP-V1710 4K/UHD is a 17-inch 3840×2160 resolution display, which can be used with the 19-inch rack mounts that are commonplace in broadcast studio sub control rooms and broadcasting vans. In addition to providing high-image-quality UHD resolution, the display features a compact body size that makes it useful for on set, carrying during on-location shooting or for use in broadcasting vans with limited space.

The DP-V2420 and DP-V1710 displays are scheduled to be available in November 2016 and February 2017 for list prices of $32,900 and $13,500, respectively.


Timecode’s :Pulse for multicamera sync and control now available

Timecode Systems, which makes wireless technologies for sharing timecode and metadata, has made its :Pulse multi camera sync and control product available for purchase.

Powered by the company’s robust Blink RF protocol, the :Pulse offers wireless sync and remote device control capability in one product. Used in its simplest form, the :Pulse is a highly accurate timecode, genlock and word clock generator with an integrated RF transceiver to ensure solid synchronization with zero drift between timecode sources.

As well as being a hub for timecode and metadata exchange, it’s also a center for wirelessly controlling devices on multicamera shoots. With a :Pulse set as the timecode master unit, users can activate the device’s integral Wi-Fi or add a wired connection to the Ethernet port to open the free, multiplatform Blink Hub app on their smartphones, tablets or laptops.

Enabled by the Blink RF protocol, the Blink Hub app allows users to not only centrally monitor and control all Timecode Systems timecode sources on set, but also any compatible camera and audio equipment to which they are connected.

Timecode Systems has already developed a bespoke remote device control solution for Sound Devices 6-Series mixer/recorders and is working on adding to the :Pulse the capability to control GoPro, Arri and Red cameras remotely via the Blink Hub app.

“With the production of the SyncBac Pro, our embedded timecode sync accessory for GoPro cameras, now in full flow, we’re very close to launching remote control of Hero4 Silver and Black cameras,” says CEO Paul Scurrell. “Using either the :Pulse’s Wi-Fi or a wired Ethernet connection into the :Pulse, SyncBac Pro users will be able to connect their GoPro Hero4 Black and Silver cameras to the Blink Hub app. This, among other things, unlocks the capability to put a GoPro to sleep remotely and then start recording again from the app when the action starts again. It’s a great way to save the camera’s battery life when it’s gear-mounted or rigged somewhere inaccessible.”

Assimilate Scratch 8.5 supports Red’s 8K Weapon Helium, 8K VistaVision

Assimilate Scratch 8.5, build 909, now includes support for Red’s new 8K Weapon Helium Sensor, as well as the 8K Weapon VistaVision-sized Sensor (full frame). Support includes the Log3G10 gamma space and RedWideGamutRGB color space.

“Offhollywood is currently providing both new 8K Weapon camera systems from Red to our customers. Having the proper tools to manage workflows and provide support to our clients as early adopters is key to our success,” explains Mark Pederson, director of technology at Offhollywood. “We knew Assimilate would be there for us to provide full support for the 8K RAW files from both the Weapon with 8K Helium sensor and the Weapon with 8K VistaVision-sized sensor in their newest release of Scratch 8.5. Of course, there are many other tools available today, but for over a decade we have found ourselves continually relying on Assimilate Scratch.”

Offhollywood offers technologies, workflows and support, specializing in UHD, 4K+, VR, 360, 3D and multi-cam productions.

The Assimilate 8.5, build 909, realtime digital workflow and tools are immediately available at $650 annually. There is also a free 30-day trial.