Category Archives: Audio

Music house Wolf at the Door opens in Venice

Wolf at the Door has opened in Venice, California, providing original music, music supervision and sound design for the ad industry and, occasionally, films. Founders Alex Kemp and Jimmy Haun have been making music for some time: Kemp was composer at Chicago-based Catfish Music and Spank, and was the former creative director of Hum in Santa Monica. Haun spent over 10 years as the senior composer at Elias, in addition to being a session musician.

Between the two of them they’ve been signed to four major labels, written music for 11 Super Bowl spots, and have composed music for top agencies, including W+K, Goodby, Chiat Day, Team One and Arnold, working with directors like David Fincher, Lance Acord, Stacy Wall and Gore Verbinski.

In addition to making music, Kemp linked up with his longtime friend Scott Brown, a former creative director at agencies including Chiat Day, 72and Sunny and Deutsch, to start a surf shop and brand featuring hand-crafted surf boards — Lone Wolfs Objets d’Surf.

With the Wolf at the Door recording studio and production office existing directly behind the Lone Wolfs retail store, Kemp and his partners bounce between different creative projects daily: writing music for spots, designing handmade Lone Wolfs surfboards, recording bands in the studio, laying out their own magazine, or producing their own original branded content.

Episodes of their original surf talk show/Web series Everything’s Not Working have featured guest pro surfers, including Dion Agius, Nabil Samadani and Eden Saul.

Wolf at the Door recently worked on an Experian commercial directed by the Malloy Brothers for the Martin Agency, as well as a Century Link spot directed by Malcom Venville for Arnold Worldwide. Kemp worked closely with Venville on the casting and arrangement for the spot, and traveled to Denver to record the duet of singer Kelvin Jones’ “Call You Home” with Karissa Lee, a young singer Kemp found specifically for the project.

“Our approach to music is always driven by who the brand is and what ideas the music needs to support,” says Kemp. “The music provides the emotional context.” Paying attention to messaging is something that goes hand in hand with carving out their own brand and making their own content. “The whole model seemed ready for a reset. And personally speaking, I like to live and work at a place where being inspired dictates the actions we take, rather than the other way around.”

Main Image L-R:  Jimmy Haun and Alex Kemp.

Sound editor/mixer Korey Pereira on 3D audio workflows for VR

By Andrew Emge

As the technologies for VR and 360 video rapidly advance and become more accessible, media creators are realizing the crucial role that sound plays in achieving realism. Sound designers are exploring this new frontier of 3D audio at the same time that tools for the medium are being developed and introduced. When everything is so new and constantly evolving, how does one learn where to start or decide where to invest time and experimentation?

To better understand this process, I spoke with Korey Pereira, a sound editor and mixer based in Austin, Texas. He recently entered the VR/360 audio world and has started developing a workflow.

Can you provide some background about who you are, the work you’ve done, and what you’ve been up to lately?
I’m the owner/creative director at Soularity Sound, an Austin-based post company. We primarily work with indie filmmakers, but also do some television and ad work. In addition to my work at Soularity, I also work as a sound editor and mixer at a few other Austin post facilities, including Soundcrafter. My credits with them include Richard Linklater’s Boyhood and Everybody Wants Some, as well as TV shows such as Shipping Wars and My 600lb Life.

You recently purchased the Pro Sound Effects NYC Ambisonics library. Can you talk about some VR projects you are working on?
In the coming months I plan to start creating audio content for VR with a local content creator, Deepak Chetty. Over the years we have collaborated on a number of projects, most recently I worked on his stereoscopic 3D sci-fi/action film, Hard Reset, which won the 2016 “Best 3D Live Action Short” from the Advanced Imaging Society.

Deepak Chetty shooting a VR project.

I love sci-fi as a genre, because there really are no rules. It lets you really go for it as far as sound. Deepak has been shifting his creative focus toward 360 content and we are hoping to start working together in that aspect in the near future.

The content Deepak is currently mostly working on non-fiction and documentary-based content in 360 — mainly environment capture with a through line of audio storytelling that serves as the backbone of the piece. He is also looking forward to experimenting with fiction-based narratives in the 360 space, especially with the use of spatial audio to enhance immersion for the viewer.

Prior to meeting Deepak, did you have any experience working with VR/3D audio?
No, this is my first venture into the world of VR audio or 3D audio. I have been mixing in surround for over a decade, but I am excited about the additional possibilities this format brings to the table.

What have been the most helpful sources for studying up and figuring out a workflow?
The Internet! There is such a wealth of information out there, and you kind of just have to dive in. The benefit of 360 audio being a relatively new format is that people are still willing to talk openly about it.

Was there anything particularly challenging to get used to or wrap your head around?
In a lot of ways designing audio for VR is not that different from traditional sound mixing for film. You start with a bed of ambiences and then place elements within a surround space. I guess the most challenging part of the transition is anticipating how the audience might hear your mix. If the viewer decides to watch a whole video facing the surrounds, how will it sound?

Can you describe the workflow you’ve established so far? What are some decisions you’ve made regarding DAW, monitoring, software, plug-ins, tools, formats and order of operation?
I am a Pro Tools guy, so my main goal was finding a solution that works seamlessly inside the Pro Tools environment. As I started looking into different options, the Two Big Ears Spatial Workstation really stood out to me as being the most intuitive and easiest platform to hit the ground running with. (Two Big Ears recently joined Facebook, so Spatial Workstation is now available for free!)

Basically, you install a Pro Tools plug-in that works as a 3D audio engine and gives you a Pro Tools project with all the routing and tracks laid out for you. There are object-based tracks that allow you to place sounds within a 3D environment as well as ambience tracks that allow you to add stereo or ambisonic beds as a basis for your mix.

The coolest thing about this platform is that it includes a 3D video player that runs in sync with Pro Tools. There is a binaural preview pathway in the template that lets you hear the shift in perspective as you move the video around in the player. Pretty cool!

In September 2016, another audio workflow for VR in Pro Tools entered the market from the Dutch company Audio Ease and their 360 pan suite. Much like the Spatial Workstation, the suite offers an object-based panner (360 pan) that when placed on every audio track allows you to pan individual items within the 360-degree field of view. The 360 pan suite also includes the 360 monitor, which allows you to preview head tracking within Pro Tools.

Where the 360 pan suite really stands out is with their video overlay function. By loading a 360 video inside of Pro Tools, Audio Ease adds an overlay on top of the Pro Tools video window, letting you pan each track in real time, which is really useful. For the features it offers, it is relatively affordable. The suite does not come with its own template, but they have a quick video guide to get you up and going fairly easily.

Are there any aspects that you’re still figuring out?
Delivery is still a bit up in the air. You may need to export in multiple formats to be able to upload to Facebook, YouTube, etc. I was glad to see that YouTube is supporting the ambisonic format for delivery, but I look forward to seeing workflows become more standardized across the board.

Any areas in which you see the need for further development, and/or where the tech just isn’t there yet?
I think the biggest limitation with VR is the lack of affordable and easy-to-use 3D audio capture devices. I would love to see a super-portable ambisonic rig that filmmakers can easily use in conjunction with shooting 360 video. Especially as media giants like YouTube are gravitating toward the ambisonic format for delivery, it would be great for them to be able to capture the actual space in the same format.

In January 2017, Røde announced the VideoMic Soundfield — an on-camera ambisonic, 360-degree surround sound microphone — though pricing and release dates have not yet been made public.

One new product I am really excited about is the Sennheiser Ambeo VR mic, which is around $1,650. That’s a bit pricey for the most casual user once you factor in a 4-track recorder, but for the professional user that already has a 788T, the Ambeo VR mic offers a nice turnkey solution. I like that the mic looks a little less fragile than some of the other options on the market. It has a built-in windscreen/cage similar to what you would see on a live handheld microphone. It also comes with a Rycote shockmount and cable to 4-XLR, which is nice.

Some leading companies have recently selected ambisonics as the standard spatial audio format — can you talk a bit about how you use ambisonics for VR?
Yeah, I think this is a great decision. I like the “future proof” nature of the ambisonic format. Even in traditional film mixing, I like having the option to export to stereo, 5.1 or 7.1 depending on the project. Until ambisonic becomes more standardized, I like that the Two Big Ears/FB 360 encoder allows you to export to the .tbe B-Format (FuMa or ambiX/YouTube) as well as quad-binaural.

I am a huge fan of the ambisonic format in general. The Pro Sound Effects NYC Ambisonics Library (and now Chicago and Tokyo as well) was my first experience using the format and I was blown away. In a traditional mixing environment it adds another level of depth to the backgrounds. I really look forward to being able to bring it to the VR format as well.


Andrew Emge is operations manager at Pro Sound Effects.

G-Tech 6-15

Lime opens sound design division led by Michael Anastasi, Rohan Young

Santa Monica’s Lime Studios has launched a sound design division. LSD (Lime Sound Design), featuring newly signed sound designer Michael Anastasi and Lime sound designer/mixer Rohan Young has already created sound design for national commercial campaigns.

“Having worked with Michael since his early days at Stimmung and then at Barking Owl, he was always putting out some of the best sound design work, a lot of which we were fortunate to be final mixing here at Lime,” says executive producer Susie Boyajan, who collaborates closely with Lime and LSD owner Bruce Horwitz and the other company partners — mixers Mark Meyuhas and Loren Silber. “Having Michael here provides us with an opportunity to be involved earlier in the creative process, and provides our clients with a more streamlined experience for their audio needs. Rohan and Michael were often competing for some of the same work, and share a huge client base between them, so it made sense for Lime to expand and create a new division centered around them.”

Boyajan points out that “all of the mixers at Lime have enjoyed the sound design aspect of their jobs, and are really talented at it, but having a new division with LSD that operates differently than our current, hourly sound design structure makes sense for the way the industry is continuing to change. We see it as a real advantage that we can offer clients both models.”

“I have always considered myself a sound designer that mixes,” notes Young. “It’s a different experience to be involved early on and try various things that bring the spot to life. I’ve worked closely with Michael for a long time. It became more and more apparent to both of us that we should be working together. Starting LSD became a no-brainer. Our now-shared resources, with the addition of a Foley stage and location audio recordists only make things better for both of us and even more so for our clients.”

Young explains that setting up LSD as its own sound design division, as opposed to bringing in Michael to sound design at Lime, allows clients to separate the mix from the sound design on their production if they choose.

Anastasi joins LSD from Barking Owl, where he spent the last seven years creating sound design for high-profile projects and building long-term creative collaborations with clients. Michael recalls his fortunate experiences recording sounds with John Fasal, and Foley sessions with John Roesch and Alyson Dee Moore as having taught him a great deal of his craft. “Foley is actually what got me to become a sound designer,” he explains.

Projects that Anastasi has worked on include the PSA on human trafficking called Hide and Seek, which won an AICP Award for Sound Design. He also provided sound design to the feature film Casa De Mi Padre, starring Will Ferrell, and was sound supervisor as well. For Nike’s Together project, featuring Lebron James, a two-minute black-and-white piece, Anastasi traveled back to Lebron’s hometown of Cleveland to record 500+ extras.

Lime is currently building new studios for LSD, featuring a team of sound recordists and a stand-alone Foley room. The LSD team is currently in the midst of a series of projects launching this spring, including commercial campaigns for Nike, Samsung, StubHub and Adobe.

Main Image: Michael Anastasi and Rohan Young.


The sound of John Wick: Chapter 2 — bigger and bolder

The director and audio team share their process.

By Jennifer Walden

To achieve the machine-like precision of assassin John Wick for director Chad Stahelski’s signature gun-fu-style action films, Keanu Reeves (Wick) goes through months of extensive martial arts and weapons training. The result is worth the effort. Wick is fast, efficient and thorough. You cannot fake his moves.

In John Wick: Chapter 2, Wick is still trying to retire from his career as a hitman, but he’s asked for one last kill. Bound by a blood oath, it’s a job Wick can’t refuse. Reluctantly, he goes to work, but by doing so, he’s dragged further into the assassin lifestyle he’s desperate to leave behind.

Chad Stahelski

Stahelski builds a visually and sonically engaging world on-screen, and then fills it full of meticulously placed bullet holes. His inspiration for John Wick comes from his experience as a stunt man and martial arts stunt coordinator for Lily and Lana Wachowski on The Matrix films. “The Wachowskis are some of the best world creators in the film industry. Much of what I know about sound and lighting has to do with their perspective that every little bit helps define the world. You just can’t do it visually. It’s the sound and the look and the vibe — the combination is what grabs people.”

Before the script on John Wick: Chapter 2 was even locked, Stahelski brainstormed with supervising sound editor Mark Stoeckinger and composer Tyler Bates — alumni of the first Wick film — and cinematographer Dan Laustsen on how they could go deeper into Wick’s world this time around. “It was so collaborative and inspirational. Mark and his team talked about how to make it sound bigger and more unique; how to make this movie sound as big as we wanted it to look. This sound team was one of my favorite departments to work with. I’ve learned more from those guys about sound in these last two films then I thought I had learned in the last 15 years,” says Stahelski.

Supervising sound editor Stoeckinger, at the Formosa Group in West Hollywood, knows action films. Mission Impossible II and III, both Jack Reacher films, Iron Man 3, and the upcoming (April) The Fate of the Furious, are just a part of his film sound experience. Gun fights, car chases, punches and impacts — Stoeckinger knows that all those big sound effects in an action film can compete with the music and dialogue for space in a scene. “The more sound elements you have, the more delicate the balancing act is,” he explains. “The director wants his sounds to be big and bold. To achieve that, you want to have a low-frequency punch to the effects. Sometimes, the frequencies in the music can steal all that space.”

The Sound of Music
Composer Bates’s score was big and bold, with lots of percussion, bass and strong guitar chords that existed in the same frequency range as the gunshots, car engines and explosions. “Our composer is very good at creating a score that is individual to John Wick,” says Stahelski. “I listened to just the music, and it was great. I listened to just the sound design, and that was great. When we put them together we couldn’t understand what was going on. They overlapped that much.”

During the final mix at Formosa’s Stage B on The Lot, re-recording mixers Andy Koyama and Martyn Zub — who both mixed the first John Wick — along with Gabe Serrano, approached the fight sequences with effects leading the mix, since those needed to match the visuals. Then Koyama made adjustments to the music stems to give the sound effects more room.

“Andy made some great suggestions, like if we lowered the bass here then we can hear the effects punch more,” says Stahelski. “That gave us the idea to go back to our composers, to the music department and the music editor. We took it to the next level conceptually. We had Tyler [Bates] strip out a lot of the percussion and bass sounds. Mark realized we have so many gunshots, so why not use those as the percussion? The music was influenced by the amount of gunfire, sound design and the reverb that we put into the gunshots.”

Mark Stoeckinger

The music and sound departments collaborated through the last few weeks of the final mix. “It was a really neat, synergistic effect of the sound and music complementing each other. I was super happy with the final product,” says Stahelski.

Putting the Gun in Gun-Fu
As its name suggests, gun-fu involves a range of guns —handguns, shotguns and assault rifles. It was up to sound designer Alan Rankin to create a variety of distinct gun effects that not only sounded different from weapon to weapon but also differentiated between John Wick’s guns and the bad guys’ guns. To help Wick’s guns sound more powerful and complex than his foes, Rankin added different layers of air, boom and mechanical effects. To distinguish one weapon from another, Rankin layered the sounds of several different guns together to make a unique sound.

The result is the type of gun sound that Stoeckinger likes to use on the John Wick films. “Even before this film officially started, Alan would present gun ideas. He’d say, ‘What do you think about this sound for the shotgun? Or, ‘How about this gun sound?’ We went back and forth many times, and once we started the film, he took it well beyond that.”

Rankin developed the sounds further by processing his effects with EQ and limiting to help the gunshots punch through the mix. “We knew we would inevitably have to turn the gunshots down in the mix due to conflicts with music or dialogue, or just because of the sheer quantity of shots needed for some of the scenes,” Rankin says.

Each gun battle was designed entirely in post, since the guns on-screen weren’t shooting live rounds. Rankin spent months designing and evolving the weapons and bullet effects in the fight sequences. He says, “Occasionally there would be a production sound we could use to help sell the space, but for the most part it’s all a construct.”

There were unique hurdles for each fight scene, but Rankin feels the catacombs were the most challenging from a design standpoint, and Zub agrees in terms of mix. “In the catacombs there’s a rapid-fire sequence with lots of shots and ricochets, with body hits and head explosions. It’s all going on at the same time. You have to be delicate with each gunshot so that they don’t all sound the same. It can’t sound repetitive and boring. So that was pretty tricky.”

To keep the gunfire exciting, Zub played with the perspective, the dynamics and the sound layers to make each shot unique. “For example, a shotgun sound might be made up of eight different elements. So in any given 40-second sequence, you might have 40 gunshots. To keep them all from sounding the same, you go through each element of the shotgun sound and either turn some layers off, tune some of them differently or put different reverb on them. This gives each gunshot its own unique character. Doing that keeps the soundtrack more interesting and that helps to tell the story better,” says Zub. For reverb, he used the PhoenixVerb Surround Reverb plug-in to create reverbs in 7.1.

Another challenge was the fight sequence at the museum. To score the first part of Wick’s fight, director Stahelski chose a classical selection from Vivaldi… but with a twist. Instead of relying solely on traditional percussion, “Mark’s team intermixed gunshots with the music,” notes Stahelski. “That is one of my favorite overall sound sequences.”

At the museum, there’s a multi-level mirrored room exhibit with moving walls. In there, Wick faces several opponents. “The mirror room battle was challenging because we had to represent the highly reflective space in which the gunshots were occurring,” explains Rankin. “Martyn [Zub] was really diligent about keeping the sounds tight and contained so the audience doesn’t get worn out from the massive volume of gunshots involved.”

Their goal was to make as much distinction as possible between the gunshot and the bullet impact sounds since visually there were only a few frames between the two. “There was lots of tweaking the sync of those sounds in order to make sure we got the necessary visceral result that the director was looking for,” says Rankin.

Stahelski adds, “The mirror room has great design work. The moment a gun fires, it just echoes through the whole space. As you change the guns, you change the reverb and change the echo in there. I really dug that.”

On the dialogue side, the mirror room offered Koyama an opportunity to play with the placement of the voices. “You might be looking at somebody, but because it’s just a reflection, Andy has their voice coming from a different place in the theater,” Stoeckinger explains. “It’s disorienting, which is what it is supposed to be. The visuals inspired what the sound does. The location design — how they shot it and cut it — that let us play with sound.”

The Manhattan Bridge
Koyama’s biggest challenge on dialogue was during a scene where Laurence Fishburne’s character The Bowery King is talking to Wick while they’re standing on a rooftop near the busy Manhattan Bridge. Koyama used iZotope RX 5 to help clean up the traffic noise. “The dialogue was very difficult to understand and Laurence was not available for ADR, so we had to save it. With some magic we managed to save it, and it actually sounds really great in the film.”

Once Koyama cleaned the production dialogue, Stoeckinger was able to create an unsettling atmosphere there by weaving tonal sound elements with a “traffic on a bridge” roar. “For me personally, building weird spaces is fun because it’s less literal,” says Stoeckinger.

Stahelski strives for a detailed and deep world in his John Wick films. He chooses Stoeckinger to lead his sound team because Stoeckinger’s “work is incredibly immersive, incredibly detailed,” says the director. “The depths that he goes, even if it is just a single sound or tone or atmosphere, Mark has a way to penetrate the visuals. I think his work stands out so far above most other sound design teams. I love my sound department and I couldn’t be happier with them.”


Jennifer Walden is a New Jersey-based writer and audio engineer.


CAS and MPSE bestow craft honors to audio pros, filmmakers

By Mel Lambert

While the Academy Awards spotlight films released during the past year, members of the Cinema Audio Society (CAS) and Motion Picture Sound Editors (MPSE) focus on both film and TV productions.

The 53rd CAS Awards — held at the Omni Los Angeles Hotel on February 18, and hosted once again by comedian Elayne Boosler — celebrated the lifetime contributions of production mixer John Pritchett with the CAS Career Achievement Award for his multiple film credits. The award was presented by re-recording mixer Scott Millan, CAS, and actor/producer Jack Black, with a special video tribute from actor/director/producer Tom Hanks. Quoting seasoned sound designer Walter Murch, Millan shared, “Dialog is the backbone of a film.”

“Sound mixing is like plastic surgery,” Black advised. “You only notice it when it’s done badly.”

Actor/director Jon Favreau received the CAS Filmmaker Award from actor/writer Seth McFarlane, film composer John Debney and CAS president Mark Ulano. Clips from the directors’ key offerings, including The Jungle Book, Chef, Cowboys & Aliens, Iron Man and Iron Man 2, were followed by pre-recorded congratulations from Stan Lee and Ed Asner. “Production and post production are invisible arts,” said Favreau. “Because if you do it right, it’s invisible. If you want to look good on the set you need to understand sound.”

Presenters Robert Forster and Melissa Hoffman flanking winners of the CAS Award for Outstanding Sound Mixing Motion Picture for La La Land.

The CAS Award for Outstanding Sound Mixing Motion Picture — Live Action went to the team behind La La Land: production mixer Steven Morrow, CAS; re-recording mixers Andy Nelson, CAS, and Ai-Ling Lee, scoring mixer Nicholai Baxter, ADR mixer David Betancourt and Foley mixer James Ashwill. “It was a blast to work with Andy Nelson and the Fox Sound Department,” said Lee. The film’s director, Damien Chazelle, also was on hand to support his award-winning crew. Other nominees included Doctor Strange, Hacksaw Ridge, Rogue One: A Star Wars Story and Sully.

The CAS Award for Outstanding Sound Mixing Motion Picture — Animated went to Finding Dory and original dialogue mixer Doc Kane, CAS, re-recording mixers Nathan Nance and Michael Semanick, CAS, scoring mixer Thomas Vicari, CAS, and Foley mixer Scott Curtis. “I’ve got the best job in the world,” Kane offered, “recording all these talented people.”

 

Kevin O’Connell and Angela Sarafyan flanking Dennis Hamlin and Peter Horner, winners of the CAS Award for Outstanding Sound Mixing Motion Picture — Documentary.

During a humorous exchange with his co-presenter Angela Sarafyan, an actress who starred in HBO’s Westworld series, re-recording mixer Kevin O’Connell, CAS, was asked why the 21-time Oscar-nominee had not — as yet — received an Academy Award. Pausing briefly to collect his thoughts, O’Connell replied that he thought the reasons were three-fold. “First, because I do not work at Skywalker Sound,” he said, referring to Disney Studios’ post facility in Northern California, which has hosted a number of nominated sound projects. “Secondly, I do not work on musicals,” he continued, referring to the high number of Oscar and similar nominations this year for La La Land. “And third, because I do not sit next to Andy Nelson,” an affectionate reference to the popular re-recording engineer’s multiple Oscar wins and current nomination for La La Land. (For O’Connell it seems the 21st time is the charm. He walked away from this year’s Oscar with a statuette for his work on Hacksaw Ridge.)

O’Connell and Sarafyan then presented the first-ever CAS Award for Outstanding Sound Mixing Motion Picture — Documentary to the team that worked on The Music of Strangers: Yo-Yo Ma and The Silk Road Ensemble: production mixers Dimitri Tisseyre and Dennis Hamlin, plus re-recording mixer Peter Horner.

The CAS Award for Outstanding Sound Mixing Television Movie or Miniseries went to The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story and production mixer John Bauman, re-recording mixers Joe Earle, CAS, and Doug Andham, CAS, ADR mixer Judah Getz and Foley mixer John Guentner. The award for Television Series — 1-Hour went to Game of Thrones: Battle of the Bastards and production mixers Ronan Hill, CAS, and Richard Dyer, CAS, re-recording mixers Onnalee Blank, CAS, and Mathew Waters, CAS, and Foley mixer Brett Voss, CAS. “Game of Thrones was a great piece of art to work on,” said Blank.

L-R:Game of Thrones: Battle of the Bastards team — Onnalee Blank, Brett Voss, and Matthew Waters, with Karol Urban and Clyde Kusatsu.

The award for Television Series — 1/2-Hour went to Modern Family: The Storm and production mixer Stephen A. Tibbo, CAS, and re-recording mixers Dean Okrand, CAS, and Brian R. Harman, CAS. The award for Television Non-Fiction, Variety or Music Series or Specials went to Grease Live! and production mixer J. Mark King, music mixer Biff Dawes, playback and SFX mixer Eric Johnston and Pro Tools playback music mixer Pablo Munguía.

The CAS Student Recognition Award went to Wenrui “Sam” Fan from Chapman University. Outstanding Product Awards went to Cedar Audio for its DNS2 Dynamic Noise Suppression Unit and McDSP for its SA-2 dialog processor.

Other presenters included Nancy Cartwright (The Simpsons), Robert Forster (Jackie Brown), Janina Gavankar (Sleepy Hollow), Clyde Kusatsu (SAG/AFTRA VP and Madame Secretary), Rhea Seehorn (Better Call Saul) and Nondumiso Tembe (Six).

MPSE
Held on February 19 at the Westin Bonaventure Hotel in downtown Los Angeles, opening remarks for the 64th MPSE Golden Reel Awards came from MPSE president Tom McCarthy. “Digital technology is creating new workflows for our sound artists. We need to take the initiative and drive technology, and not let technology drive us,” he said, citing recent and upcoming MPSE Sound Advice confabs. “The horizons for sound are expanding, particularly virtual reality. Immersive formats from Dolby, Auro, DTS and IMAX are enriching the cinematic experience.”

Scott Gershin, MPSE Filmmaker Award recipient Guillermo Del Toro and Tom McCarthy.

The annual MPSE Filmmaker Award was presented to writer/director Guillermo del Toro by supervising sound editor/sound designer Scott Gershin, who has worked with him for the past 15 years on such films as Hellboy II: The Golden Army (2008) and Pacific Rim (2013). “Sound editing is an opportunity in storytelling,” the director offered. “There is always a balance we need to strike between sound effects and music. It’s a delicate tango. Sound design and editing is a curatorial position. I always take that partnership seriously in my films.”

Referring to recent presidential decisions to erect border walls and tighten immigration controls, del Torro was candid in his position. “I’m a Mexican,” he stated. “Giving me this award [means] that the barriers people are trying to erect between us are false,” he stressed, to substantial audience applause.

Supervising sound editor/sound designer Wiley Stateman and producer Shannon McIntosh presented the MPSE Career Achievement Award to supervising sound editor/sound designer Harry Cohen, who has worked on more than 150 films, including many directed by Quentin Tarantino, who made a surprise appearance to introduce the award recipient. “I aspired to be a performing musician,” Cohen acknowledged, “and was 31 when I became an editor. Sound design is a craft. You refine the director’s creativity through your own lens.” He also emphasized the mentoring process within the sound community, “which leads to a free flow of information.”

The remaining Golden Reel Awards comprised several dozen categories encompassing feature films, long- and short-form TV, animation, documentaries and other media.

The Best Sound Editing In Feature Film — Music Score award went to Warcraft: The Beginning and music editors Michael Bauer and Peter Myles. The Best Sound Editing In Feature Film — Music, Musical Feature award went to La La Land music editor Jason Ruder.

The Hacksaw Ridge team included (L-R) Michelle Perrone, Kimberly Harris, Justine Angus, Jed Dodge, Robert Mackenzie Liam Price and Tara Webb.

The Best Sound Editing In Feature Film — Dialog/ADR award went to director Mel Gibson’s Hacksaw Ridge and supervising sound editor Andy Wright, supervising ADR editors Justine Angus and Kimberly Harris, dialog editor Jed Dodge and ADR editor Michele Perrone. The Best Sound Editing In Feature Film — FX/Foley Award also went to Hacksaw Ridge and supervising sound editors Robert Mackenzie, Foley editor Steve Burgess and Alex Francis, plus sound effects editors Liam Price, Tara Webb and Steve Burgess.

The MPSE Best Sound & Music Editing: Television Animation Award went to Albert  supervising sound editor Jeff Shiffman, MPSE, dialogue editors Michael Petak and Anna Adams, Foley editor Tess Fournier, music editor Brad Breeck plus SFX editors Jessey Drake, MPSE, Tess Fournier and Jeff Shiffman, MPSE. The Best Sound & Music Editing: Television Documentary Short-Form award to Sonic Sea and supervising sound editor Trevor Gates, dialog editor Ryan Briley and SFX editors Ron Aston and Christopher Bonis. The Best Sound & Music Editing: Television Documentary Long-Form award went to My Beautiful Broken Brain supervising sound editor Nick Ryan, dialog editor Claire Ellis and SFX editor Tom Foster. The Best Sound & Music Editing: Animation — Feature Film award went to Moana supervising sound editor Tim Nielsen, supervising dialog editor Jacob Riehle, Foley editors Thom Brennan and Matthew Harrison, music editors Earl Ghaffari and Dan Pinder, plus SFX editors Jonathan Borland, Pascal Garneau and Lee Gilmore. The Best Sound & Music Editing: Documentaries — Feature Film award to The Music of Strangers: Yo-Yo Ma and The Silk Road Ensemble and supervising sound editor Pete Horner, sound designer Al Nelson and SFX editor Andre Zweers.

The Verna Fields Award in Sound Editing in Student Films was a tie, with $1,500 checks being awarded to Fishwitch, directed by Adrienne Dowling from the National Film and Television School, and Icarus by supervising sound editor/sound designer Zoltan Juhasz from Dodge College of Film and Media Arts, Chapman University.

The MPSE Best Sound & Music Editing: Special Venue award went to supervising sound editor/sound designer Jamey Scott for his work on director Patrick Osborne’s Pearl, a panoramic virtual reality presentation — and which has also been nominated in the Oscars Best Animated Short Category. The Best Sound Editing In Television: Short Form — Music Score award went to music editor David Klotz for his work on Stranger Things, Chapter Three: Holly Jolly. “The show’s composers — Kyle Dixon and Michael Stein — were an inspiration to work with,” said Klotz, “as was the sound team at Technicolor.” The Best Sound Editing In Television: Short Form — Music, Musical award was another tie between music editor Jason Tregoe Newman and Bryant J. Fuhrmann for Mozart in the Jungle — Now I Will Sing and music editor Jamieson Shaw for The Get Down — Raise Your Words, Not Your Voice.

The winning Westworld team included Thomas E. de Gorter (center), Matthew Sawelson, Geordy Sincavage, Michael Head, Mark R. Allen and Marc Glassman.

The Best Sound Editing In Television: Short Form — Dialog/ADR award went to the team from Penny Dreadful III, including supervising sound editor Jane Tattersall, supervising dialogue editor David McCallum, dialog editor Elma Bello, and ADR editors Dale Sheldrake and Paul Conway. The Best Sound Editing In Television: Short Form — FX/Foley award went to Westworld — Trompe L’Oeil supervising sound editors Thomas E. de Gorter, MPSE, and Matthew Sawelson, MPSE, Foley editors Geordy Sincavage and Michael Head, and sound designers Mark R. Allen, MPSE, and Marc Glassman, MPSE. The same post team won The Best Sound Editing In Television: Long Form — FX/Foley award for Westworld — The Bicameral Mind. The Best Sound Editing In Television: Long Form — Dialog/ADR award went to The Night Of — Part 1 The Beach and supervising sound editor Nicholas Renbeck, and dialog editors Sara Stern, Luciano Vignola and Odin Benitez.

Presenters included actor Erich Riegelmann, actress Julie Parker, Avid director strategic solutions Rich Nevens, SFX editor Liam Price, producer/journalist Geoff Keighley, Formosa Interactive VP of creative services Paul Lipson, CAS president Mark Ulano, actress Andrene Ward-Hammond, supervising sound editors Mark Lanza and Bernard Weiser, picture editor Sabrina Plisco, and Technicolor VP/head of theatrical Sound Jeff Eisner.

MPSE president McCarthy offered that the future for entertainment sound has no boundaries. “It is impossible to predict what new challenges will be presented to practitioners of our craft in the years to come,” he said. “It is up to all of us to meet those challenges with creativity, professionalism and skill. MPSE membership now extends around the world. We are building a global network of sound professionals in order to help artists collaborate and share ideas with their peers.”

A complete list of MPSE Golden Reel Awards can be found on its website.

Main Image (L-R): John Debney, CAS Filmmaker Award recipient Jon Favreau, Seth MacFarlane and Mark Ulano. 

CAS images – Alex J. Berliner/ABImages
MPSE Images – Chris Schmitt Photography


Mel Lambert is principal of Content Creators, an LA-based copywriting and editorial service, and can be reached at mel.lambert@content-creators.com. Follow him on Twitter @MelLambertLA.


Quick Chat: Scott Gershin from The Sound Lab at Technicolor

By Randi Altman

Veteran sound designer and feature film supervising sound editor Scott Gershin is leading the charge at the recently launched The Sound Lab at Technicolor, which, in addition to film and television work, focuses on immersive storytelling.

Gershin has more than 100 films to his credit, including American Beauty (which earned him a BAFTA nomination), Guillermo del Toro’s Pacific Rim and Dan Gilroy’s Nightcrawler. But films aren’t the only genre that Gershin has tackled — in addition to television work (he has an Emmy nom for the TV series Beauty and the Beast), this audio post pro has created the sound for game titles such as Resident Evil, Gears of War and Fable. One of his most recent projects was contributing to id Software’s Doom.

We recently reached out to Gershin to find out more about his workflow and this new Burbank-based audio entity.

Can you talk about what makes this facility different than what Technicolor has at Paramount? 
The Sound Lab at Technicolor works in concert with our other audio facilities, tackling film, broadcast and gaming projects. In doing so we are able to use Technicolor’s world-class dubbing, ADR and Foley stages.

One of the focuses of The Sound Lab is to identify and use cutting-edge technologies and workflows not only in traditional mediums, but in those new forms of entertainment such as VR, AR, 360 video/films, as well as dedicated installations using mixed reality. The Sound Lab at Technicolor is made up of audio artists from multiple industries who create a “brain trust” for our clients.

Scott Gershin and The Sound Lab team.

As an audio industry veteran, how has the world changed since you started?
I was one of the first sound people to use computers in the film industry. When I moved from the music industry into film post production, I brought that knowledge and experience with me. It gave me access to a huge number of tools that helped me tell better stories with audio. The same happened when I expanded into the game industry.

Learning the interactive tools of gaming is now helping me navigate into these new immersive industries, combining my film experience to tell stories and my gaming experience using new technologies to create interactive experiences.

One of the biggest changes I’ve seen is that there are so many opportunities for the audience to ingest entertainment — creating competition for their time — whether it’s traveling to a theatre, watching TV (broadcast, cable and streaming) on a new 60- or 70-inch TV, or playing video games alone on a phone or with friends on a console.

There are so many choices, which means that the creators and publishers of content have to share a smaller piece of the pie. This forces budgets to be smaller since the potential audience size is smaller for that specific project. We need to be smarter with the time that we have on projects and we need to use the technology to help speed up certain processes — allowing us more time to be creative.

Can you talk about your favorite tools?
There are so many great technologies out there. Each one adds a different color to my work and provides me with information that is crucial to my sound design and mix. For example, Nugen has great metering and loudness tools that help me zero in on my clients LKFS requirements. With each client having their own loudness requirements, the tools allow me to stay creative, and meet their requirements.

Audi’s The Duel

What are some recent projects you’ve worked on?
I’ve been working on a huge variety of projects lately. Recently, I finished a commercial for Audi called The Duel, a VR piece called My Brother’s Keeper, 10 Webisodes of The Strain and a VR music piece for Pentatonix. Each one had a different requirement.

What is your typical workflow like?
When I get a job in, I look at what the project is trying to accomplish. What is the story or the experience about? I ask myself, how can I use my craft, shaping audio, to better enhance the experience. Once I understand how I am going to approach the project creatively, I look at what the release platform will be. What are the technical challenges and what frequencies and spacial options are open to me? Whether that means a film in Dolby Atmos or a VR project on the Rift. Once I understand both the creative and technical challenges then I start working within the schedule allotted me.

Speed and flow are essential… the tools need to be like musical instruments to me, where it goes from brain to fingers. I have a bunch of monitors in front of me, each one supplying me with different and crucial information. It’s one of my favorite places to be — flying the audio starship and exploring the never-ending vista of the imagination. (Yeah, I know it’s corny, but I love what I do!)


Review: Soundly — an essential tool for sound designers

By Ron DiCesare

The people behind the sound effects database Soundly and I think alike. We both imagine a world where all audio files are accessible from any computer at anytime. Soundly is helping accomplish that with their cloud-based audio sound effect searchable database and online sound effects library. Having access to thousands of sound effects online via the cloud from any computer anywhere with Internet access is long overdue. I am so pleased to see Soundly paving the way to what I see as the inevitable workflow of the future.

When I started out in audio post production years ago, sound effect libraries were all on CDs. Back then I had to look through a huge directory listing the tens of thousands of sounds available on all of the audio CDs, which I called “the big phone book of sounds.” I remember thinking to myself that there must be a better way. After years of struggling with these phone books, technology finally made a viable step forward with iTunes. That led to my “innovative” idea to rip all of my sound effect CDs to iTunes to use it as a makeshift searchable database. It was crude, but worked a hell of a lot better than the phone books and audio CDs!

Once digital audio files became the norm, technology got on board and finally offered us searchable database programs exclusively for sound effects. Now Soundly has made another leap forward with its cloud access.

Over the years, I have acquired well over 100,000 sound effects — 112,495 to be exact. In my library, there are a fair amount of custom sounds (particularly vocal reactions) that I have recorded myself. All of these sounds are stored on a 1TB external hard drive (with an ilok/dongle) that I take with me to every studio I work at, including my home studio.

The problem for me is that I am a freelance audio mixer and sound designer working at many different studios in New York City, in addition to my home studio on Long Island. That means I am forced to take my external sound effects drive and ilok to every studio I work at for every session. I am always at risk of losing the drive and/or ilok or simply forgetting them behind when going to and from studios. I have often asked myself, wouldn’t it be great to have all my sounds accessible from any computer with Internet access at all times? Enter Soundly.

Soundly can be broken down into two main parts. First, they offer 300-plus or 7,500-plus sounds included in their database for immediate use. This depends on which price option you choose, which is either free or a monthly subscription. Second, they offer the ability to upload all of users’ existing sound effects to a local drive or, better yet, the cloud. Uploading to the cloud makes your sounds available from a computer with Internet access, in addition to the over 7,500 sound effects included with Soundly.

A Wide Appeal
Soundly is available for Mac and PC, and is very easy to install — it took me just a few minutes. Once installed, the program immediately gives access to over 7,500 high-quality sound effects, many as 96kHz, 24-bit Wav files. This is ideal for anyone not able to spend the thousands of dollars needed to build up a large library by purchasing sound effects from a variety of companies. That could include video editors who are often asked to do sound design without a proper or significant database of sounds to choose from. All too often these video editors are forced to look to the Internet for any kind of free sound effect, but the quality can be dubious at times. Audio mixers and sound designers, who are just starting out and getting their libraries underway could benefit as well.

In addition to accessing 7,500-plus high-quality sounds, Soundly allows for the purchase of additional sound effect libraries in the store section of the program, such as “Cinematic Hits and Transitions” from SoundBits and “Summer Nature Ambiences” by Soundholder. The store also gives the user access to all free sound effects across the Internet via Freesound.org. This will no doubt help fill in any gaps in the large variety of sounds needed for any video editor or sound designer. But just as the Soundly disclaimer notes for the free sound effects, there is no way to enforce any kind of quality control or audio standard for the wide range of free sounds available throughout the Internet. Even so, Soundly manages to be a one-stop shop for all Internet sound searches rather than just randomly searching the Internet blindly.

Targeted Appeal
Any seasoned audio mixer or sound designer will tell you that it is best to stay away from free sounds found on the Internet in general. Audio mixers like me who have been working for over 30 years (though I do not look like I am over 50!) are more likely to have built up their own sound effect libraries over the years that they prefer to use. For example, my sound effect library contains both purchased sounds from many of the various commercial libraries and a fair amount of custom sounds I have recorded on the job. That is why uploading a user’s own entire sound effect library to the cloud for use with Soundly (which in my case is almost 1TB) is an absolute necessity.

Now I admit, I am the exception and not the rule. I need access to all of my audio files at all times because I am never in one place for long. That is why Soundly is ideal for me. I can dial up Soundly and access the cloud instantly from any computer that has Internet access. Now I can leave my sound effects drive at home, which is a huge relief.

I know that the vast majority of audio professionals on my level have a staff position. Most of them typically work at multi-room facilities and rarely, if ever, need to leave their facility for an audio mix or sound design. Soundly offers multi-room licenses for just that reason. But more importantly, it means that most of the major audio facilities have their sound effect libraries accessible to all their staff on some kind of network server such as a RAID or NAS. So why switch to Soundly’s cloud storage service when an audio or video facility has access to many TBs worth of network storage of their own? The answer in a nutshell is price.

To fully understand if Soundly could replace a network server in a large audio or video facility, let’s breakdown Soundly’s pricing options starting with the free option. Soundly offers access to the free cloud library of over 300 sound effects, a maximum of 2,500 pre-existing local files and no upload space allotment. Next is Soundly’s Pro subscription for $14.99 a month, allowing for all the features of Soundly, access to the 7,500-plus cloud-based sound effects and unlimited access to pre-existing local files.

But for the real heavy lifting, Soundly offers storage space options needed to upload large amounts of sounds to the cloud at a very competitive rate. For example, to get access to my pre-existing sound effect library totaling nearly 1TB worth of sound effects, Soundly offers an annual fee of $500 for cloud storage that size. Compare that to the cost of installing and maintaining RAID or NAS storage systems that a large facility might use and it could very well be a better and more cost-effective option, not to mention it’s accessible everywhere. So freelancers like me, or staff audio engineers, can count on reliable, safe, large-scale storage of their data by switching to Soundly.

Operation
Installing Soundly is fast and easy. I was instantly able to access all of the included sounds. Once my entire sound effect library was uploaded, it was well worth the time and effort needed for such a large amount of files. Searching for sound effects worked exactly as I expected it to. All possible sounds came up with the search criteria I specified, all based on file names and metadata. Simply click on any sound file to play it and see if it’s right for your project.

Now here is where Soundly really impressed me. There are two ways of exporting your sound files: drag and drop and what Soundly calls “spot-to.” Drag and drop works with Pro Tools, Nuendo, Avid Media Composer, Adobe Premiere Pro CC and FCP X and 7, to name a few. The “spot-to” function works with Pro Tools, specifically Pro Tools HD 12.7. The “spot-to” function is where the real power and speed comes into play. The “spot-to” icon appears automatically whenever Pro Tools is active (it disappears when the Pro Tools is not active, so just be aware of that). Click on the icon and your sound file is sent to Pro Tools in an instant.

There are two great options when using the “spot-to” icon, spot to bin or spot to timeline. Each one has its advantages depending on how you like to work. Sending to your bin makes it accessible via the clip list in Pro Tools. Sending to the timeline adds it to wherever your curser is located on any track. That is a real time saver. To illustrate this, let’s look at how few steps are needed to get your sound file in your time line or bin. I counted three steps. Step one: select the sound in Soundly. Step two: send to Pro Tools using the “spot-to” icon. Step three: immediately working with the sound file in my session, which really is not a step. So, we can say it is actually just two steps. Yes, it’s that fast and easy.

For me, the most important aspect of Soundly’s “spot-to” function is that it copies the sound file to Pro Tools rather than referencing it. This is significant. Some people may have learned the hard way, like I have, that referencing a sound effect does not include that sound effect in your audio folder within your session. This is key because coping it into your session’s audio folder allows you to move your session from drive to drive, room to room or studio to studio without the dreaded missing sound file error message in Pro Tools when the drive or network housing the sound effects cannot be located. As far as I know, only Sound Miner’s higher priced options do this crucial copy to audio folder step. In contrast, all of Soundly’s pricing options do this essential step.

Let’s not ignore the fact that Soundly works as a stand-alone program without any DAW or video editing software needed. Simply drag and drop the sound file to a folder located anywhere, say your desktop, should you happen to want to work outside of your DAW or video software for whatever reason.

Organization
With Soundly, there are a variety of ways you can organize your library, all customizable and up to the user. For me, I kept it very simple. I chose a three-folder hierarchy as follows: Soundly’s built-in cloud library, my entire personal sound effects library and my “greatest hits” for my most useful sounds. All three folders are located under the master cloud folder, which means that all my sounds and folders can be searched at once, or in any combination. You can choose one or more of your folders whenever you do a search. That means you can really hone in your search if you would like to set up multiple sub folders – or not. For me, when I do a search I will typically want to search all my sounds all at once since I cannot take the time to think of sub categories that may or may not yield better results. My organization and set up is purely my own preference and it is sure to vary from user to user. Each person can set up their folders however they feel best to organize their library.

Hard to Pick a Favorite Feature
I think my absolute favorite feature of Soundly is the pitch shift function. That’s because whenever I am finding and auditioning sounds with the pitch shift engaged (up or down), the sound file will be sent to my DAW with the exact amount of pitch shift applied to the sound effect! That means I do not have to recreate or guess the amount of pitch shifting I used when auditioning the sound after it is imported into Pro Tools. The same goes for the reverse function. There is no doubt that pitch shift and reverse are the two most common alterations for sound effects done by sound designers. Soundly has these two crucial functions built-in to the search and export functions.

Another feature worth noting is marking favorite or popular sounds with a star, like flagging an important email. Marking your favorite sounds with the star icon means you do not have to make a separate folder for your favorites as I have done in the past. Playlists are another noteworthy feature. Making playlists can be a great way of storing all your sounds as you are searching for a project that can be downloaded or sent to your DAW in a more organized fashion after your search. This is much faster than downloading each sound effect one by one as you find the sound effects needed for larger sound design projects. Making multiple playlists is another way to speed up the searching process over all. Playlists can be shared with other Soundly users.

More to Come
In the future, we can expect to see more options for the output format. Currently you can choose bit rate and sample rate, but you will only be able to export .wav files. Future releases are slated to include AIFF, MP3 and even Ogg Vorbis for the gaming world.

As Soundly grows, there will be more sound effects added to the cloud for use. Not surprisingly, the folks behind Soundly are sound designers and the program clearly reflects that. Soundly’s developer Peder Jørgensen and sound designer Christian Schaanning really understand how today’s sound designers work. More importantly, they understand how tomorrow’s sound designers will work.


Ron DiCesare is an audio mixer and sound designer located in the New York City area. His work can be heard on promos and shows, including “Noisey” featuring Kendrick Lamar, “B. Deep,” “F**k That’s Delicious” and “Moltissomo” with Chef Mario Batali on Vice’s Munchies channel. He also works on spots and promos. He can be reached at rononizer@gmail.com.


The A-List: The sound of La La Land

By Jennifer Walden

Director/writer Damien Chazelle’s musical La La Land has landed an incredible 14 Oscar nominations — not to mention fresh BAFTA wins for Best Film, Best Cinematography, Original Music and Best Leading Actress, in addition to many, many other accolades.

The story follows aspiring actress Mia (Emma Stone) who meets the talented-but-struggling jazz pianist Sebastian (Ryan Gosling) at a dinner club, where he’s just been fired from his gig of plinking out classic Christmas tunes for indifferent diners. Mia throws out a compliment as Sebastian approaches, but he just breezes right past, ignoring her completely. Their paths cross again at a Los Angeles pool party, and this time Mia makes a lasting impression on Sebastian. They eventually fall in love, but their life together is complicated by the realities of making their own dreams happen.

Sounds of the City
La La Land is a love story but it’s also a love letter to Los Angeles, says supervising sound editor Ai-Ling Lee, who shares an Oscar nomination for Best Sound Editing on the film with co-supervising sound editor Mildred Iatrou Morgan. One of Chazelle’s initial directives was to have the cityscape sound active and full of life. “He gave me film references, like Boogie Nights and Mean Streets, even though the latter was a New York film. He liked the amount of sound coming out from the city, but wanted a more romantic approach to the soundscape on La La Land. He likes the idea of the city always being bustling,” says Lee.

Mildred Iatrou Morgan and Ai-Ling Lee. Photo Credit: Jeffrey Harlacker

In addition to La La Land’s musical numbers, director Chazelle wanted to add musical moments throughout the film, some obvious, like the car radios in the opening traffic jam, and some more subtle. Lee explains, “You always hear music coming from different sources in the city, like music coming out of a car going by or mariachi music coming from down the hallway of Sebastian’s apartment building.” The culturally diverse incidental music, traffic sounds, helicopters, and local LA birds, like mourning doves, populate the city soundscape and create a distinct Los Angeles vibe.

For Lee’s sound editorial and sound design, she worked in a suite at EPS-Cineworks in Burbank — the same facility where the picture editor and composer were working. “Damien and Tom Cross [film editor] were cutting the picture there, and Justin Hurwitz the composer was right next door to them, and I was right across the hall from them. It was a very collaborative environment so it was easy to bring someone over to review a scene or sounds. I could pop over there to see them if I had any questions,” says Lee, who was able to design sound against the final music tracks. That was key to helping those two sound elements gel into one cohesive soundtrack.

Bursting Into Song
Director Chazelle’s other initial concern for sound was the music, particularly how the spoken dialogue would transitions into the studio recorded songs. That’s where supervising sound editor Morgan got to flex her dialogue editing muscles. “Milly [Morgan] knows this style of ADR, having worked on musicals before,” says Lee. “Damien wanted the dialogue to seamlessly transition into a musical moment. He didn’t want it to feel like suddenly we’re playing a pre-recorded song. He liked to have things sound more natural, with realistic grounded sounds, to help blend the music into the scene,” says Lee.

To achieve a smooth dialogue transition, Morgan recorded ADR for every line that led into a song to ensure she had a good transition between production dialogue and studio recorded dialogue, which would transition more cleanly into the studio-recorded music. “I cued that way for La La Land, but I ended up not having to use a lot of that. The studio recorded vocals and the production sound were beautifully recorded using the same mics in both cases. They were matching very well and I was able to go with the more emotional, natural sounding songs that were sung on-set in some cases,” says Morgan, who worked from her suite at 20th Century Fox studios along with ADR editor Galen Goodpaster.

Mia’s audition song, “The Fools Who Dream,” was one track that Morgan and the director were most concerned about. As Mia gives her impromptu audition she goes from speaking softly to suddenly singing, and then she starts singing louder. That would have been difficult to recreate in post because her performance on-set — captured by production mixer Steven Morrow — was so beautiful and emotional. The trouble was there were creaking noises on the track. Morgan explains, “As Mia starts singing, the camera moves in on her. It moves through the office and through the desk. It was a breakaway desk and they broke it apart so that the camera could move through it. That created all the creaking I heard on the track.”

Morgan was able to save the live performance by editing in clean ambience between words, and finding alternate takes that weren’t ruined by the creaking noise. She used Elastic Audio inside Pro Tools, as well as the Pro Tools TCE tool (time compression/expansion tool) to help tweak the alt takes into place. “I had to go through all of the outtakes, word by word, syllable by syllable, and find ones that fit in with the singing, and didn’t have creaks on them… and fit in terms of sync. It was very painstaking. It took me a couple of days to do it but it was a very rewarding result. That took a lot of time but it was so worth it because that was a really important moment in the movie,” says Morgan.

Reality Steps In
Not all on-set song performances could be used in the final track, so putting the pre-recorded songs in the space helped to make the transition into musical moments feel more realistic. Precisely crafted backgrounds, made with sounds that fit the tone of the impending song, gradually step aside as the music takes over. But not all of the real-world sounds go away completely. Foley helped to ground a song into the reality on screen by marrying it to the space. For example, Mia’s roommates invite her to a party in a song called “Someone in the Crowd.” Diegetic sounds, such as the hairdryer, the paper fan flicking open, occasional footsteps, and clothing rustles helped the pre-recorded song fit naturally into the scene. Additionally, Morgan notes that production mixer Morrow “did an excellent job of miking the actors with body mics and boom mics, even during the musical numbers that were sung to playback, like ‘Someone in the Crowd,’ just in case there was something to capture that we could use. There were a couple of little vocalizations that we were able to use in the number.”

Foley also played a significant role in the tap dance song “A Lovely Night.” Originally performed as a soft shoe dance number, director Chazelle decided to change it to a tap dance number in post. Lee reveals, “We couldn’t use the production sound since there was music playback in the scene for the actors to perform to. So, we had to fully recreate everything with the sound. Damien had a great idea to try to replace the soft shoe sound with tap shoes. It was an excellent idea because the tap sound plays so much better with the dance music than the soft shoe sound does.”

Lee enlisted Mandy Moore, the dance choreographer on the film, and several dancers to re-record the Foley on that scene. Working with Foley artist Dan O’Connell, of One Step Up located on The Jane Russell Foley Stage at 20th Century Fox Studios, they tried various weights of tap shoes on different floor surfaces before narrowing it down to the classic “Fred and Ginger” sound that Chazelle was looking for. “Even though they are dancing on asphalt, we ended up using a wooden floor surface on the Foley stage. Damien was very precise about playing up a step here and playing up a scuff there, because it plays better against the music. It was really important to have the taps done to the rhythm of the song as opposed to being in sync with the picture. It fools your brain. Once you have everything in rhythm with the music, the rest flows like butter,” says Lee. She cut the tap dance Foley to picture according to Chazelle’s tastes, and then invited Moore to listen to the mix to make sure that the tap dance routine was realistic from a dancer’s point of view.

Inside the Design
One of Lee’s favorite scenes to design was the opening sequence of the film, which starts with the sound of a traffic jam on a Los Angeles freeway. The sound begins in mono with a long horn honk over a black and white Cinemascope logo. As the picture widens and the logo transitions into color, Lee widens the horn honk into stereo and then into the surrounds. From that, the sound builds to a few horns and cars idling. Morgan recorded a radio announcer to establish the location as Los Angeles. The 1812 Overture plays through a car radio, and the sound becomes futzed as the camera pans to the next car in the traffic jam. With each car the camera passes the radio station changes. “This is Los Angeles and it is a mixed cultural city. Damien wanted to make sure there was a wide variety of music styles, so Justin [Hurwitz] gave me a bunch of different music choices, an eclectic selection to choose from,” says Lee. She added radio tuning sounds, car idling sounds, and Foley of tapping on the steering wheel to ground the scene in reality. “We made sure that the sound builds but doesn’t overpower the first musical number. The first trumpet hit comes through this traffic soundscape, and gradually the real city sounds give way to the first song, ‘Another Day of Sun.’”

One scene that stood out for Morgan was after Mia’s play, when she’s in her dressing room feeling sad that the theater was mostly empty for her performance. Not even Sebastian showed up. As she’s sitting there, we hear two men from the audience disparaging her and her play. Initially, Chazelle and his assistant recorded a scratch track for that off-stage exchange, but he asked Morgan to reshoot it with actors. “He wanted it to sound very naturalistic, so we spent some time finding just the right actors who didn’t sound like actors. They sound like regular people,” says Morgan.

She had the actors improvise their lines on why they hated the play, how superficial it was and how pretentious it was. Following some instruction from Chazelle, they cut the scene together. “We screened it and it was too mean, so we had to tone it back a little,” shares Morgan. “That was fun because I don’t always get to do that, to create an ADR scene from scratch. Damien is meticulous. He knows what he wants and he knows what he doesn’t want. But in this case, he didn’t know exactly what they should say. He had an idea. So I do my version and he gave me ideas and it went back and forth. That was a big challenge for me but a very enjoyable one.”

The Mix
In addition to sound editing, Lee also mixed the final soundtrack with re-recording mixer Andy Nelson at Fox Studios in Los Angeles. She and Nelson share an Oscar nomination for Best Sound Mixing on La La Land. Lee says, “Andy and I had made a film together before, called Wild, directed by Jean-Marc Vallée. So it made sense for me to do both the sound design and to mix the effects. Andy mixed the music and dialogue. And Jason Ruder was the music editor.”

From design to mix, Chazelle’s goal was to have La La Land sound natural — as though it was completely natural for these people to burst into song as they went through their lives. “He wanted to make sure it sounded fluid. With all the work we did, we wanted to make the film sound natural. The sound editing isn’t in your face. When you watch the movie as a whole, it should feel seamless. The sound shouldn’t take you out of the experience and the music shouldn’t stand apart from the sound. The music shouldn’t sound like a studio recording,” concludes Lee. “That was what we were trying to achieve, this invisible interaction of music and sound that ultimately serves the experience.”


Jennifer Walden is a New Jersey-based audio engineer and writer.


A closer look at some London-based audio post studios

By Mel Lambert

While in the UK recently for a holiday/business trip, I had the opportunity to visit several of London’s leading audio post facilities and catch up with developments among the Soho community.

‘Baby Driver’

I also met up with Julian Slater, a highly experienced supervising sound editor, sound designer and re-recording mixer who relocated to the US a couple of years ago, working first at Formosa Group and then at the Technicolor at Paramount facility in Hollywood. Slater was in London working on writer/director Edgar Wright’s action-drama Baby Driver, starring Lily James, Jon Hamm, Jon Bernthal and Jamie Foxx. The film follows the progress of a young getaway driver who, after being coerced into working for a crime boss, finds himself taking part in a heist that’s doomed to fail.

Goldcrest Films
Slater handled sound effects pre-dubs at Goldcrest Films on Dean Street in the heart of Soho’s film district, while co-mixer Tim Cavagin worked on dialog and Foley pre-mixes at Twickenham TWI Studios in Richmond, a London suburb west of the capital. Finals started just before Christmas at Goldcrest, with Slater handling music and SFX, while Cavagin oversaw dialog and Foley. “We are using Goldcrest’s new Dolby Atmos-capable Theater 1, which opened last May,” explains Slater. “The post crew includes sound effects editors Arthur Graley, Jeremy Price and Martin Cantwell, plus dialog/ADR supervisor Dan Morgan and Foley editor Peter Hanson.

“I cannot reveal too much about my sound design for Baby Driver,” admits Slater, “but because the lead character [actor Ansel Elgort] has a hearing anomaly, I am working with pitch changes to interweave various elements of the film’s soundtrack.”

Baby Driver is scheduled for UK and US release in August, and will be previewed in mid-March at the SXSW Film Festival in Austin. Composer Steven Price’s score for the film was recorded at Abbey Road Studios in North London. Price wrote the music for writer/director Alfonso Cuarón’s Gravity (2013), which won him the Academy Award for Best Original Score.

British-born Wright is probably best known for comedies, such as Shaun of the Dead (2004), Hot Fuzz (2007) and The World’s End (2013), several of which featured Slater’s talents as supervising sound editor, sound designer and/or re-recording mixer.

Slater is a multiple BAFTA and Emmy Award nominee. After graduating from the School of Audio Engineering (now the SAE Institute) in London, at the age of 22 he co-founded the Hackenbacker post company and designed sound for his first feature film, director Mike Figgis’ Leaving Las Vegas (1995). Subsequent films include In Bruges (2008), Dark Shadows (2012), Scott Pilgrim Vs. the World (2010) and Attack the Block (2011).

Goldcrest Films, which has a NYC-based studio as well, provides post services for film and broadcast projects, including Carol (2015), The Danish Girl (2015) and Les Misérables (2012). The facility features three Dolby dubbing theaters with DCI-compliant projection, plus ADR and Foley recording stages, sound design and editing suites, offline editorial and grading suites. “Last May we opened Theatre 1,” reports studio manager Rob Weatherall, “a fully sound-isolated mixing theater that is Dolby Atmos Premier-certified.”

Goldcrest Films Theater 1 (L-R): Alex Green, Rowan Watson, Julian Slater, Rob Weatherall and Robbie Scott.

First used to re-record writer/director Paul Greengrass’ Jason Bourne (2016), the new room houses a hybrid Avid 32-fader S6 M40 Pro Tools control surface section within a 72-fader dual-engine AMS Neve DFC3D Gemini frame. By building interchangeable AMS and S6 “buckets” in a single console frame, the facility can mix and match formats according to the re-recording engineers’ requirements — either “in the box” using the S6 surface, or a conventional workflow using the DFC sections.

“I like working in the box,” says Slater, “since it lets me retain all my sound ideas right through print mastering. For Baby Driver we premixed to a 9.1-channel bed with Atmos objects and brought this submix here to Goldcrest where we could open everything seamlessly on the S6 console and refine all my dialog, music and effects submixes for the final Atmos immersive mix. Because I have so much sound design for the music being heard by our lead character, including sound cues for the earbuds and car radios, it’s the only way to work! We also had a lot of music playback on the set.”

The supervising sound editor needed to carefully prepare myriad sound cues. “Having worked on all of his films, I have come to recognize that Edgar [Wright] is an extremely sound-conscious director,” Slater reports. “The soundtrack for Baby Driver needed to work seamlessly and sound holistic — not forced in any way. In other words, while sound is important in this film — for obvious reasons — it is critical that we don’t detract the audience from the dramatic storyline.”

Theater 1’s 55-loudspeaker Atmos array includes a mixture of Crown-powered JBL 5732s Screen Array cabinets in the front with Meyer cabinets for the surrounds. Accommodated formats include 5.1, 7.1 and DTS:X. Five Pro Tools playback systems are available with Waves Platinum plug-in packages, plus a 192-channel Pro Tools HDX 3 recorder. Each Pro Tools rig features a DAD DX32 audio interface, with both Audinate Dante- and MADI-format digital outputs. The latter can be routed to the DFC console for conventional mixing or to a sixth rig with a DAD AX32 converter system for in the box mixing on the S6 control surface. Video projection is via a Barco DP2K-10SX and an Integrated Media Server for DCP playback, and Pro Tools Native with an AJA video card. Outboards include a pair of Lexicon 960 reverbs, two TC 6000 reverb and four dbx Subharmonic synthesizers.

Hackenbacker Audio Post
Around the corner from Goldcrest, Slater’s former facility Hackenbacker Audio Post comprises a multi-room post facility that was purchased in July 2015 by Molinare from e-Post Media, owners of Halo Post. Hackenbacker handled sound for the TV series Downton Abbey, Cold Feet and Thunderbirds Are Go, plus director Richard Ayoade’s film, The Double (2013). Owner/founder Nigel Heath remains a director of the group management team for the facility’s three dubbing studios, five edit suites and a large Foley stage located a short distance away.

Hackebacker’s Studio 2

Hackenbacker Studio 1 has been Heath’s home base for more than a decade. It houses a large-format AMS Neve 48-fader MMC Neve console with three Avid HD3 Pro Tools systems, two iZ Technologies RADAR 24-track recorder/players and a Dynaudio M3F 5.1 monitoring system that was used to re-record Hot Fuzz, In Bruges, Shaun of the Dead and many other projects.

Studio 2 features Dynaudio monitoring along with an Avid Icon 16-fader D-Control surface linked to a Pro Tools HDX system. It is used for 5.1 TV mixing and ADR and includes a large booth suitable for both ADR and voice-over. Also designed for TV mixing and ADR, Studio 3 features Quested monitoring and an Avid ICON 32-fader D-control surface linked to a Pro Tools HDX system. Edit 1 and 2 handle a wide cross section of sound effects editorial assignments, with access to a large sound library and other creative tools. Edit 3 and 4 are equipped for dialog and ADR editing. Edit 5 features a transfer bay and QC facility in which all sound material is verified and checked.

Twickenham TWI Studios
According to technology development manager/re-recording mixer Craig Irving, Twickenham TWI Studios recently completed mixing of the soundtrack for writer/director Stanley Tucci’s Final Portrait, the story of Swiss painter and sculptor Alberto Giacometti, starring Armie Hammer and Geoffrey Rush. The film was re-recorded by Tim Cavagin and Irving, with sound editorial by Tim Hands on dialog and Jack Gillies on effects.

The lounge at Twickenham-TWI.

“Dialog tracks for Baby Driver were pre-mixed by Tim in our Atmos-capable Theatre 1,” explains Irving. “Paul Massey will be returning soon to complete the mix in Theatre 1 for director Ridley Scott’s Alien Covenant, which reunites the same sound team that worked on The Martian — with Oliver Tarney supervising, Rachel Tate on dialog, and Mark Taylor and our very own Dafydd Archard on effects.” Massey also mixed Scott’s Exodus: Gods and Kings (2014) at Twickenham TWI. He also worked on director Rufus Norris’ London Road (2015) and director Tim Miller’s Deadpool (2016). He recently completed the upcoming Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales. While normally based at Fox Post Production Services in West Los Angeles, Massey also spends time in his native England overseeing a number of film projects.

“Their stages have also been busy with production of Netflix’s Black Mirror series, which consists of six original films looking at the darker side of modern life. Episode 1 was directed by Jodie Foster. “To service an increase in production, we are investing in new infrastructure that will feature a TV mixing stage,” explains Irving. “The new room will be based around an Avid S6 control surface and used as a bespoke area to mix original TV programming, as well as creating TV mixes of our theatrical titles. Our Picture Post area is also being expanded with a second FilmLight Baselight Two color grading system with full 4K projection for both theatrical and broadcast projects.”

Twickenham TWI’s rooftop bar and restaurant opened its doors to clients and staff last year. “It has proved extremely popular and is open to membership from within the industry,” Irving says. The facility’s remodeled front office and reception area was designed Barbarella Design. “We have chosen a ‘’60s retro, Mad Men theme in greys and red,” says the studio’s COO Maria Walker. In addition to its two main re-recording theaters, TWI offers 40 cutting rooms, an ADR/Foley stage and three shooting stages.

Warner Bros. De Lane Lea
Just up the street from Goldcrest Films is Warner Bros. De Lane Lea, which started as a multi-room studio. It also has a rather unusual ancestry. In the 1940s, Major De Lane Lea was looking to improve the way dialog for film and later TV could be recorded and replaced in order to streamline dubbing between French and English. This resulted in his setting up a company called De Lane Lea Processes and a laboratory in Soho. The company also developed a number of other products aimed at post, and over the next 30 years opened a variety of studios in London for voice recording, film, TV and jingle mixing, music recording and orchestral-score recording.

De Lane Lea’s Stage 1.

Around 1970, the operation moved into its current building on Dean Street and shifted its focus toward film and TV sound. The facility, which was purchased by Warner Bros. in 2012, currently includes four re-recording stages, two ADR stages for recording dialog, voiceovers and commentaries, plus 50 cutting rooms, a preview theater, transfer bay and a café/bar. Three of the Dolby-certified mixing stages are equipped with AMS Neve DFC Gemini consoles or Avid S6 control surfaces and Meyer monitoring. A TV mixing stage boasts an Avid Pro Tools control surface and JBL monitoring.

Stage 1 features an AMS Neve 80-fader DFC Gemini digital two-mixer console with an Avid control surface, linked to a Meyer Sound EXP system providing Dolby Atmos monitoring. Six Pro Tools playback systems are available — three 64-channel HDX and three 128-channel HDX2 rigs — together with a 128-channel HDX2 Pro Tools recorder. Film projection is from a Kinoton FP38ECII 35mm unit, with a Barco DP2K-23B digital cinema projector offering resolutions up to 2K. Video playback within Pro Tools is via a VCubeHD nonlinear player or a Blackmagic card. Outboards include a Lexicon 960 and a TC 6000 reverb, plus two dbx Subharmonic Synthesizers. Stage 2 is centered around an Avid S6 M40 24-fader console linked to three Pro Tools playback systems — a pair of 64-channel HDX2 and a single 128-channel HDX2 rig — plus a 64-channel HDX recorder. Monitoring is via a 7.1-channel Meyer Sound EXP system.

Warner Bros. Studios Leavesden
Located 20 miles north west of Central London and serving as its UK-based shooting lot, Warner Bros. Studios Leavesden offers a number of well-equipped stages for large-scale productions, in addition to a large tank for aquatic scenes. The facility’s history dates back almost 70 years, to when it was originally acquired by the UK Ministry of Defense in 1939 as a WWII production base for building aircraft, including the iconic Mosquito Fighter and Halifax Bombers. When hostilities ceased, the site was purchased by Rolls Royce and continued as a base for aircraft manufacture, progressing onto large engines. It eventually closed in 1992.

Warner Bros. Leavesden’s studio layout.

In 1994, Leavesden began a new life as a film studio and over the following decades was home to a number of high-profile productions, including the James Bond film Goldeneye (1995), Mortal Kombat: Annihilation (1997), Star Wars Episode One: The Phantom Menace (1999), An Ideal Husband (1999) and director Tim Burton’s Sleepy Hollow (1999).

By 2000, Heyday Films had acquired use of the site on behalf of Warner Bros. for what would be the first in a series of Harry Potter films — Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone (2001) — with each subsequent film in the franchise during the following decade being shot at Leavesden. While other productions, almost exclusively Warner Bros. productions, made partial use of the complex, the site was mostly occupied by permanent standing sets for the Harry Potter films.

In 2010, as the eighth and final Harry Potter film was nearing completion, Warner Bros. announced its intention to purchase the studio as a permanent European base, the first studio to do so since MGM in the 1940s. By November of that year, the studio had completed purchase of Leavesden Studios and announced plans to invest more than £100 million (close to $200 million at the time) on the site they had occupied, converting Stages A through H into sound stages. As part of the redevelopment, Warner Bros. created two entirely new soundstages to house a permanent public exhibition called Warner Bros. Studio Tour London — The Making of Harry Potter, creating 300 new jobs. It opened to the public in early 2012.

With over 100 acres, WBSL features one of the most extensive backlots in Europe, with level, graded areas, including a former aircraft runway, a variety of open fields, woodlands, hills and clear horizons. In addition, it offers bespoke art departments, dry-hire edit suites and VFX rooms, in addition to a pair of the largest water tanks in Europe, with a 60-by-60 foot filtered and heated indoor tank, and a 250-by-250 foot exterior tank.

Main Image: Goldcrest London’s Theater 1.


Mel Lambert is principal of Content Creators, an LA-based copywriting and editorial service, and can be reached at mel.lambert@content-creators.com. Follow him on Twitter @MelLambertLA.

Alvaro Rodríguez

Behind the Title: Histeria Music’s chief audio engineer Alvaro Rodríguez

NAME: Alvaro Rodríguez

COMPANY: Histeria Music (@histeriamusic)

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
Miami’s Histeria Music is a music production and audio post company. Since its foundation in 2003 we have focused on supporting our clients’ communication needs with powerful music and sound that convey a strong message and create a bond with the audience. We offer full audio post production, music production, and sound design services for advertising, film, TV, radio, video games and the corporate world.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
CEO/ Chief Audio Engineer

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
As an audio post engineer, I work on 5.1 and stereo mixing, ADR and voiceover recordings, voiceover castings and talent direction, music search and editing, dialogue cleanup, remote recording via ISDN and/or Source Connect and sound design.

Studio A

Studio A

As the owner and founder of the studio, I take care of a ton of things. I make sure our final productions are of the highest quality possible, and handle client services, PR, bookkeeping, social media and marketing. Sometimes it’s a bit overwhelming but I wouldn’t trade it for anything else!

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
Some people might think that I just sit behind a console, pushing buttons trying to make things sound pretty. In reality, I do much more than that. I advise creative and copywriters on changes in scripts that might help better fit whatever project we are recording. I also direct talent using creative vocabulary to ensure that their delivery is adequate and their performance hits that emotion we are trying to achieve. I get to sound design, edit and move audio clips around on my DAW, almost as if I were composing a piece of music, adding my own sound to the creative process.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
Sound design! I love it when I get a video from any of our clients that has no sound whatsoever, not even a scratch recording of a voiceover. This gives me the opportunity to add my signature sound and be as creative as possible and help tell a story. I also love working on radio spots. Since there is no video to support the audio, I usually get to be a bigger part of the creative process once we start putting together the spots. Everything from the way the talent is recorded to the sounds and the way phrases and words are edited together is something I’ll never get tired of doing.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
Sales. It’s tricky because as the owner when you succeed, it’s the best feeling in the world, but it can be very frustrating and overwhelming sometimes.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE TIME OF THE DAY?
During work it has to be that moment you get the email saying the spots have been approved and are ready for traffic. On a personal level, it’s when I take my nine-year old to soccer practice, usually around 6pm

Studio B

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
Wow, I have no idea how to answer this question. I can’t see myself doing anything else, really, although I’ll add that I am an avid home brewer and enjoy the craft quite a bit.

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
Ever since I was a kid I had this fascination with things that make sounds. I was always drawn to a guitar or simply buckets I could smack and make some sort of a rhythmic pattern. After high school, I went to college and started studying business administration, only to follow in my dad and brother’s steps. Not to anyone’s surprise I quit after the second semester and ended up doing a bit of soul searching. Long story short, I ended up attending Full Sail University where I graduated in the Recording Arts program back in 2000

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
This year started with a great and fun project for us. We are recording ADR for the Netflix series Bloodline. We are also currently working on the audio post and film scoring of a short film called Andante based on a story from Argentinian author Julio Cortazar.

Also worth mentioning is that we recently concluded the audio post for seasons one and two of the MTV show Ridículos, which is the Spanish and Portuguese language adaptations of the original English version of Ridiculousness that currently airs in Latin America and Brazil.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
The first project I ever did for the advertising industry. I was 23 and a recent graduate of Full Sail. All the stars and planets aligned and a campaign for Budweiser — both for the general and US Hispanic markets — landed in my lap. This came from Del Rivero Messianu DDB (currently known as ALMA DDB, Ad Age’s 2017 multicultural agency of the year).

I was living with my parents at the time and had a small home studio in the garage. No Pro Tools, no Digi Beta, just good-old Cool Edit and a VHS player (yes, I manually pressed play on the VHS and Cool Edit to sync my music to picture). Long story short, I ended up writing and producing the music for that TV spot. This led to me unavoidably opening the doors of Histeria Music to the public in 2003.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
iZotope’s RX Post Production Suite, Telos Zephyr Xstream ISDN box and Source Connect. I also use the FabFilter Pro-Q 2 quite a bit.

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
I live in Miami and the beach is my backyard, so I find myself relaxing for hours at the beach on weekends. I love to spend time with my family during my son’s soccer practices and games. When I am really stressed and need to be alone, I tend to brew some crafty beers at home. Great hobby!