Category Archives: AR

postPerspective Impact Award winners from SIGGRAPH 2017

Last April, postPerspective announced the debut of our Impact Awards, celebrating innovative products and technologies for the post production and production industries that will influence the way people work. We are now happy to present our second set of Impact Awards, celebrating the outstanding offerings presented at SIGGRAPH 2017.

Now that the show is over, and our panel of VFX/VR/post pro judges has had time to decompress, dig out and think about what impressed them, we are happy to announce our honorees.

And the winners of the postPerspective Impact Award from SIGGRAPH 2017 are:

  • Faceware Technologies for Faceware Live 2.5
  • Maxon for Cinema 4D R19
  • Nvidia for OptiX 5.0  

“All three of these technologies are very worthy recipients of our first postPerspective Impact Awards from SIGGRAPH,” said Randi Altman, postPerspective’s founder and editor-in-chief. “These awards celebrate companies that define the leading-edge of technology while producing tools that actually make users’ working lives easier and projects better, and our winners certainly fall into that category.

“While SIGGRAPH’s focus is on VFX, animation, VR/AR and the like, the types of gear they have on display vary. Some are suited for graphics and animation, while others have uses that slide into post production. We’ve tapped real-world users in these areas to vote for our Impact Awards, and they have determined what tools might be most impactful to their day-to-day work. That’s what makes our awards so special.”

There were many new technologies and products at SIGGRAPH this year, and while only three won an Impact Award, our judges felt there were other updates that it was important to let people know about as well.

Blackmagic Design’s Fusion 9 was certainly turning heads and Nvidia’s VRWorks 360 Video was called out as well. Chaos Group also caught our judges attention with V-Ray for Unreal Engine 4.

Stay tuned for future Impact Award winners in the coming months — voted on by users for users — from IBC.

Red’s Hydrogen One: new 3D-enabled smartphone

In their always subtle way, Red has stated that “the future of personal communication, information gathering, holographic multi-view, 2D, 3D, AR/VR/MR and image capture just changed forever” with the introduction of Hydrogen One, a pocket-sized, glasses-free “holographic media machine.”

Hydrogen One is a standalone, full-featured, unlocked multi-band smartphone, operating on Android OS, that promises “look around depth in the palm of your hand” without the need for separate glasses or headsets. The device features a 5.7-inch professional hydrogen holographic display that switches between traditional 2D content, holographic multi-view content, 3D content and interactive games, and it supports both landscape and portrait modes. Red has also embedded a proprietary H30 algorithm in the OS system that will convert stereo sound into multi-dimensional audio.

The Hydrogen system incorporates a high-speed data bus to enable a comprehensive and expandable modular component system, including future attachments for shooting high-quality motion, still and holographic images. It will also integrate into the professional Red camera program, working together with Scarlet, Epic and Weapon as a user interface and monitor.

Future-users are already talking about this “nifty smartphone with glasses-free 3D,” and one has gone so far as to describe the announcement as “the day 360-video became Betamax, and AR won the race.” Others are more tempered in their enthusiasm, viewing this as a really expensive smartphone with a holographic screen that may or might not kill 360 video. Time will tell.

Initially priced between $1,195 and $1,595, the Hydrogen One is targeted to ship in Q1 of 2018.

Dell 6.15

Lenovo’s ‘Transform’ event: IT subscriptions and AR

By Claudio Santos

Last week I had the opportunity to attend Lenovo’s “Transform” event, in which the company unveiled its newest releases as well as its plans for the near future. I must say they had quite the lineup ready.

The whole event was divided into two tracks “Datacenters” and “PC and Smart Devices.” Each focused on its own products and markets, but a single idea permeated all announcements in the day. It’s what Lenovo calls the “Fourth Revolution.” That’s what the company calls the next step in integration between devices and the cloud. Their vision is that soon 5G mobile Internet will be available, allowing for devices to seamlessly connect to the cloud on the go and more importantly, always stay connected.

While there were many interesting announcements throughout the day, I will focus on two that seem more closely relatable to most post facilities.

The first is what Lenovo is calling “PC as a service.” They want to sell the bulk of the IT hardware and support needs for companies as subscription-based deals, and that would be awesome! Why? Well, it’s simply a fact of life now that post production happens almost exclusively with the aid of computer software (sorry, if you’re still one of the few cutting film by hand, this article won’t be that interesting for you).

Having to choose, buy and maintain computers for our daily work takes a lot of research and, most notably, time. Between software updates, managing different licenses, subscriptions and hunting down weird quirks of the system, a lot of time is taken away from more important tasks such as editing or client relationship. When you throw a server and a local network in the mix it becomes a hefty job that takes a lot of maintenance.

That’s why bigger facilities employ IT specialists to deal with all that. But many post facilities aren’t big enough to employ a full-time IT person, nor are their needs complex enough to warrant the investment.

Lenovo sees this as an opportunity to simplify the role of the IT department by selling subscriptions that include the hardware, the software and all the necessary support (including a help desk) to keep the systems running without having to invest in a large IT department. More importantly, the subscription would be flexible. So, during periods in which you have need for more stations/support you can increase the scope of the subscription and then shrink it once again when the demands lower, freeing you from absorbing the cost of unused machines/software that would just sit around unused.

I see one big problem in this vision: Lenovo plans to start the service with a minimum of 1,000 seats for a deal. That is far, far more staff than most post facilities have, and at that point it would probably just be worth hiring a specialist that can also help you automate your workflow and develop customized tools for your projects. It is nonetheless an interesting approach, and I hope to see it trickle down to smaller clients as it solidifies as a feasible model.

AR
The other announcement that should interest post facilities is Lenovo’s interest in the AR market. As many of you might know, augmented reality is projected to be an even bigger market than it’s more popular cousin virtual reality, largely due to its more professional application possibilities.

Lenovo has been investing in AR and has partnered up with Metavision to experiment and start working towards real work-environment offerings of the technology. Besides the hand gestures that are always emphasized in AR promo videos, one very simple use-case seems to be in Lenovo’s sights, and that’s one I hope to see being marketable very soon: workspace expansion. Instead of needing three or four different monitors to accommodate our ever-growing number of windows and displays while working, with AR we will be able to place windows anywhere around us, essentially giving us a giant spherical display. A very simple problem with a very simple solution, but one that I believe would increase the productivity of editors by a considerable amount.

We should definitely keep an eye on Lenovo as they embark one this new quest for high-efficiency solutions for businesses, because that’s exactly what the post production industry finds itself in need of right now.


Claudio Santos is a sound editor and spatial audio mixer at Silver Sound. Slightly too interested in technology and workflow hacks, he spends most of his waking hours tweaking, fiddling and tinkering away on his computer.


Adobe acquires Mettle’s SkyBox tools for 360/VR editing, VFX

Adobe has acquired all SkyBox technology from Mettle, a developer of 360-degree and virtual reality software. As more media and entertainment companies embrace 360/VR, there is a need for seamless, end-to-end workflows for this new and immersive medium.

The Skybox toolset is designed exclusively for post production in Adobe Premiere Pro CC and Adobe After Effects CC and complements Adobe Creative Cloud’s existing 360/VR cinematic production technology. Adobe will integrate SkyBox plugin functionality natively into future releases of Premiere Pro and After Effects.

To further strengthen Adobe’s leadership in 360-degree and virtual reality, Mettle co-founder Chris Bobotis will join Adobe, bringing more than 25 years of production experience to his new role.

“We believe making virtual reality content should be as easy as possible for creators. The acquisition of Mettle SkyBox technology allows us to deliver a more highly integrated VR editing and effects experience to the film and video community,” says Steven Warner, VP of digital video and audio at Adobe. “Editing in 360/VR requires specialized technology, and as such, this is a critical area of investment for Adobe, and we’re thrilled Chris Bobotis has joined us to help lead the charge forward.”

“Our relationship started with Adobe in 2010 when we created FreeForm for After Effects, and has been evolving ever since. This is the next big step in our partnership,” says Bobotis, now director, professional video at Adobe. “I’ve always believed in developing software for artists, by artists, and I’m looking forward to bringing new technology and integration that will empower creators with the digital tools they need to bring their creative vision to life.”

Introduced in April 2015, SkyBox was the first plugin to leverage Mettle’s proprietary 3DNAE technology, and its success quickly led to additional development of 360/VR plugins for Premiere Pro and After Effects.

Today, Mettle’s plugins have been adopted by companies such as The New York Times, CNN, HBO, Google, YouTube, Discovery VR, DreamWorks TV, National Geographic, Washington Post, Apple and Facebook, as well as independent filmmakers and YouTubers.


Technicolor Experience Center launches with HP Mars Home Planet

By Dayna McCallum

Technicolor’s Tim Sarnoff and Marcie Jastrow oversaw the official opening of the Technicolor Experience Center (TEC), with the help of HP’s Sean Young and Rick Champagne, on June 15. The kickoff event also featured the announcement that TEC is teaming up with HP to develop HP Mars Home Planet, an experimental VR experience to reinvent life on Mars for one million humans.

The purpose-built TEC space is located in Blackwelder creative park, a business district designed specifically for the needs of creative and media companies in Culver City. The center, dedicated to bringing artists and scientists together to explore immersive media, covers almost 27,000 square feet, with 3,000 square feet dedicated to motion capture. The TEC serves as a hub connecting Technicolor’s creative houses and research labs across the globe, including an R&D team from France that made an appearance during event via a remote demo, with technology partners, such as HP.

Sarnoff, Technicolor deputy CEO and president of production services, said, “The TEC is about realizing the aspirations of all the players who are part of the nascent immersive ecosystem we work in, from content creation, to content distribution and content consumption. Designing and delivering immersive experiences will require a massive convergence of artistic, technological and economic talent. They will have to come together productively. That is why the TEC has been formed. It is designed to be a practical place where we take theoretical constructs and move systematically to tactical implementation through a creative and dynamic process of experimentation.”

The HP Mars Home Planet project is a global, immersive media collaboration uniting engineers, architects, designers, artists and students to design an urban area on Mars in a VR environment. The project will be built on the terrain from Fusion’s “Mars 2030” game, which is based on research, images, and expertise based on NASA research. In addition to HP, Fusion and TEC, partners include Nvidia, Unreal Engine, Autodesk and HTCVive. Additional details will be released at Siggraph 2017.

Young, worldwide segment manager for product development and AEC for HP Inc., said of the Mars project, “To ensure fidelity and professional-grade quality and a fantastic end-user experience, the TEC is going to oversee the virtual reality development process of the work that is going to be done by collaborators from all over the world. It is an incredible opportunity for anybody from anywhere in the world that is interested in VR to work with Technicolor.”


VR Audio — Differences between A Format and B Format

By Claudio Santos

A Format and B Format. What is the difference between them after all? Since things can get pretty confusing, especially with such non-descriptive nomenclature, we thought we’d offer a quick reminder of what each is in the spatial audio world.

A Format and B Format are two analog audio standards that are part of the ambisonics workflow.

A Format is the raw recording of the four individual cardioid capsules in ambisonics microphones. Since each microphone has different capsules at slightly different distances, the A Format is somewhat specific to the microphone model.

B Format is the standardized format derived from the A Format. The first channel carries the amplitude information of the signal, while the other channels determine the directionality through phase relationships between each other. Once you get your sound into B Format you can use a variety of ambisonic tools to mix and alter it.

It’s worth remembering that the B Format also has a few variations on the standard itself; the most important to understand are Channel Order and Normalization standards.

Ambisonics in B Format consists of four channels of audio — one channel carries the amplitude signal while the others represent the directionality in a sphere through phase relationships. Since this can only be achieved by the combination between the channels, it is important that:

– The channels follow a known order
– The relative level between the amplitude channel and the others must be known in order to properly combine them together

Each of these characteristics has a few variations, with the most notable ones being

– Channel Order
– Furse-Malham standard
– ACN standard

– Normalization (level)
– MaxN standard
-SN3D standard

The combination of these variations result in two different B Format standards:
– Furse-Malham – Older standard that is still supported by a variety of plug-ins and other ambisonic processing tools
– AmbiX – Modern standard that has been widely adopted by distribution platforms such as YouTube

Regardless of the format you will deliver your ambisonics file in, it is vital to keep track of the standards you are using in your chain and make the necessary conversions when appropriate. Otherwise rotations and mirrors will end up in the wrong direction and the whole soundsphere will break down into a mess.


Claudio Santos is a sound editor and spatial audio mixer at Silver Sound. Slightly too interested in technology and workflow hacks, he spends most of his waking hours tweaking, fiddling and tinkering away on his computer.


VR audio terms: Gaze Activation v. Focus

By Claudio Santos

Virtual reality brings a lot of new terminology to the post process, and we’re all having a hard time agreeing on the meaning of everything. It’s tricky because clients and technicians sometimes have different understandings of the same term, which is a guaranteed recipe for headaches in post.

Two terms that I’ve seen being confused a few times in the spatial audio realm are Gaze Activation and Focus. They are both similar enough to be put in the same category, but at the same time different enough that most of the times you have to choose completely different tools and distribution platforms depending on which technology you want to use.

Field of view

Focus
Focus is what the Facebook Spatial Workstation calls this technology, but it is a tricky one to name. As you may know, ambisonics represents a full sphere of audio around the listener. Players like YouTube and Facebook (which uses ambisonics inside its own proprietary .tbe format) can dynamically rotate this sphere so the relative positions of the audio elements are accurate to the direction the audience is looking at. But the sounds don’t change noticeably in level depending on where you are looking.

If we take a step back and think about “surround sound” in the real world, it actually makes perfect sense. A hair clipper isn’t particularly louder when it’s in front of our eyes as opposed to when its trimming the back of our head. Nor can we ignore the annoying person who is loudly talking on their phone on the bus by simply looking away.

But for narrative construction, it can be very effective to emphasize what your audience is looking at. That opens up possibilities, such as presenting the viewer with simultaneous yet completely unrelated situations and letting them choose which one to pay attention to simply by looking in the direction of the chosen event. Keep in mind that in this case, all events are happening simultaneously and will carry on even if the viewer never looks at them.

This technology is not currently supported by YouTube, but it is possible in the Facebook Spatial Workstation with the use of high Focus Values.

Gaze Activation
When we talk about focus, the key thing to keep in mind is that all the events happen regardless of the viewer looking at them or not. If instead you want a certain sound to only happen when the viewer looks at a certain prop, regardless of the time, then you are looking for Gaze Activation.

This concept is much more akin to game audio then to film sound because of the interactivity element it presents. Essentially, you are using the direction of the gaze and potentially the length of the gaze (if you want your viewer to look in a direction for x amount of seconds before something happens) as a trigger for a sound/video playback.

This is very useful if you want to make impossible for your audience to miss something because they were looking in the “wrong” direction. Think of a jump scare in a horror experience. It’s not very scary if you’re looking in the opposite direction, is it?

This is currently only supported if you build your experience in a game engine or as an independent app with tools such as InstaVR.

Both concepts are very closely related and I expect many implementations will make use of both. We should all keep an eye on the VR content distribution platforms to see how these tools will be supported and make the best use of them in order to make 360 videos even more immersive.


Claudio Santos is a sound editor and spatial audio mixer at Silver Sound. Slightly too interested in technology and workflow hacks, he spends most of his waking hours tweaking, fiddling and tinkering away on his computer.

FMPX8.14

VR Workflows: The Studio | B&H panel during NAB

At this year’s NAB Show in Las Vegas, The Studio B&H hosted a series of panels at their booth. One of those panels addressed workflows for virtual reality, including shooting, posting, best practices, hiccups and trends.

The panel, moderated by postPerspective editor-in-chief Randi Altman, was made up of SuperSphere’s Lucas Wilson, ReDesign’s Greg Ciaccio, Local Hero Post’s Steve Bannerman and Jaunt’s Koji Gardner.

While the panel was streamed live, it also lives on YouTube. Enjoy…


Timecode and GoPro partner to make posting VR easier

Timecode Systems and GoPro’s Kolor team recently worked together to create a new timecode sync feature for Kolor’s Autopano Video Pro stitching software. By combining their technologies, the two companies have developed a VR workflow solution that offers the efficiency benefits of professional standard timecode synchronization to VR and 360 filming.

Time-aligning files from the multiple cameras in a 360° VR rig can be a manual and time-consuming process if there is no easy synchronization point, especially when synchronizing with separate audio. Visually timecode-slating cameras is a disruptive manual process, and using the clap of a slate (or another visual or audio cue) as a sync marker can be unreliable when it comes to the edit process.

The new sync feature, included in the Version 3.0 update to Autopano Video Pro, incorporates full support for MP4 timecode generated by Timecode’s products. The solution is compatible with a range of custom, multi-camera VR rigs, including rigs using GoPro’s Hero 4 cameras with SyncBac Pro for timecode and also other camera models using alternative Timecode Systems products. This allows VR filmmakers to focus on the creative and not worry about whether every camera in the rig is shooting in frame-level synchronization. Whether filming using a two-camera GoPro Hero 4 rig or 24 cameras in a 360° array creating resolutions as high as 32K, the solution syncs with the same efficiency. The end results are media files that can be automatically timecode-aligned in Autopano Video Pro with the push of a button.

“We’re giving VR camera operators the confidence that they can start and stop recording all day long without the hassle of having to disturb filming to manually slate cameras; that’s the understated benefit of timecode,” says Paul Bannister, chief science officer of Timecode Systems.

“To create high-quality VR output using multiple cameras to capture high-quality spherical video isn’t enough; the footage that is captured needs to be stitched together as simply as possible — with ease, speed and accuracy, whatever the camera rig,” explains Alexandre Jenny, senior director of Immersive Media Solutions at GoPro. “Anyone who has produced 360 video will understand the difficulties involved in relying on a clap or visual cue to mark when all the cameras start recording to match up video for stitching. To solve that issue, either you use an integrated solution like GoPro Omni with a pixel-level synchronization, or now you have the alternative to use accurate timecode metadata from SyncBac Pro in a custom, scalable multicamera rig. It makes the workflow much easier for professional VR content producers.”

Hobo’s Howard Bowler and Jon Mackey on embracing full-service VR

By Randi Altman

New York-based audio post house Hobo, which offers sound design, original music composition and audio mixing, recently embraced virtual reality by launching a 360 VR division. Wanting to offer clients a full-service solution, they partnered with New York production/post production studios East Coast Digital and Hidden Content, allowing them to provide concepting through production, post, music and final audio mix in an immersive 360 format.

The studio is already working on some VR projects, using their “object-oriented audio mix” skills to enhance the 360 viewing experience.

We touched base with Hobo’s founder/president, Howard Bowler, and post production producer Jon Mackey to get more info on their foray into VR.

Why was now the right time to embrace 360 VR?
Bowler: We saw the opportunity stemming from the advancement of the technology not only in the headsets but also in the tools necessary to mix and sound design in a 360-degree environment. The great thing about VR is that we have many innovative companies trying to establish what the workflow norm will be in the years to come. We want to be on the cusp of those discoveries to test and deploy these tools as the ecosystem of VR expands.

As an audio shop you could have just offered audio-for-VR services only, but instead aligned with two other companies to provide a full-service experience. Why was that important?
Bowler: This partnership provides our clients with added security when venturing out into VR production. Since the medium is relatively new in the advertising and film world, partnering with experienced production companies gives us the opportunity to better understand the nuances of filming in VR.

How does that relationship work? Will you be collaborating remotely? Same location?
Bowler: Thankfully, we are all based in West Midtown, so the collaboration will be seamless.

Can you talk a bit about object-based audio mixing and its challenges?
Mackey: The challenge of object-based mixing is not only mixing based in a 360-degree environment or converting traditional audio into something that moves with the viewer but determining which objects will lead the viewer, with its sound cue, into another part of the environment.

Bowler: It’s the creative challenge that inspires us in our sound design. With traditional 2D film, the editor controls what you see with their cuts. With VR, the partnership between sight and sound becomes much more important.

Howard Bowler pictured embracing VR.

How different is your workflow — traditional broadcast or spot work versus VR/360?
Mackey: The VR/360 workflow isn’t much different than traditional spot work. It’s the testing and review that is a game changer. Things generally can’t be reviewed live unless you have a custom rig that runs its own headset. It’s a lot of trial and error in checking the mixes, sound design, and spacial mixes. You also have to take into account the extra time and instruction for your clients to review a project.

What has surprised you the most about working in this new realm?
Bowler: The great thing about the VR/360 space is the amount of opportunity there is. What surprised us the most is the passion of all the companies that are venturing into this area. It’s different than talking about conventional film or advertising; there’s a new spark and its fueling the rise of the industry and allowing larger companies to connect with smaller ones to create an atmosphere where passion is the only thing that counts.

What tools are you using for this type of work?
Mackey: The audio tools we use are the ones that best fit into our Avid ProTools workflow. This includes plug-ins from G-Audio and others that we are experimenting with.

Can you talk about some recent projects?
Bowler: We’ve completed projects for Samsung with East Coast Digital, and there are more on the way.

Main Image: Howard Bowler and Jon Mackey