Category Archives: Animation

Foundry intros Mari 4.0

Foundry’s Mari 4.0 is the latest version of the company’s digital 3D painting and texturing tool. Foundry launches Mari 4.0 with a host of advanced features, making the tool easier to use and faster to learn. Mari 4.0 comes equipped with more flexible and configurable exporting, simpler navigation, and a raft of improved workflows.

Key benefits of Mari 4.0 include:
Quicker start-up and export: Mari 4.0 allows artists to get projects up-and-running faster with a new startup mechanism that automatically performs the steps previously completed manually by the user. Shaders are automatically built, with channels connected to them as defined by the channel presets in the startup dialog. The user also now gets the choice of initial lighting and shading setup. The new Export Manager configures the batch exporting of Channels and Bake Point Nodes. Artists can create and manage multiple export targets from the same source, as well as perform format conversions during export. This allows for far more control and flexibility when passing Mari’s texture maps down the pipeline.

Better navigation: A new Palettes Toolbar containing all Mari’s palettes offers easy access and visibility to everything Mari can do. It’s now easier to expand a Palette to fullscreen by hitting the spacebar while your mouse is hovered over it. Tools of a similar function have been grouped under a single button in the Tools toolbar, taking up less space and allowing the user to better focus on the Canvas. Various Palettes have been merged together, removing duplication and simplifying the UI, making Mari both easier to learn and use.

Improved UI: The Colors Palette is now scalable for better precision, and the component sliders have been improved to show the resulting color at each point along the control. Users can now fine tune their procedural operations with precision keyboard stepping functionality brought into Mari’s numeric controls.

The HUD has been redesigned so it no longer draws over the paint subject, allowing the user to better focus on their painting and work more effectively. Basic Node Graph mode has been removed: Advanced is now the default. For everyone learning Mari, the Non-Commercial version now has full Node Graph access.

Enhanced workflows: A number of key workflow improvements have been brought to Mari 4.0. A drag-and-drop fill mechanism allows users to fill paint across their selections in a far more intuitive manner, reducing time and increasing efficiency. The Brush Editor has been merged into the Tool Properties Palette, with the brush being used now clearly displayed. It’s now easy to browse and load sets of texture files into Mari, with a new Palette for browsing texture sets. The Layers Palette is now more intuitive when working with Group layers, allowing users to achieve the setups they desire with less steps. And users now have a shader in Mari that previews and works with the channels that match their final 3D program/shader: The Principled BRDF, based on the 2012 paper from Brent Burley of Walt Disney Animation Studios.

Core: Having upgraded to OpenSubdiv 3.1.x and introduced the features into the UI, users are able to better match the behavior of mesh subdivision that they get in software renderers. Mari’s user preference files are now saved with the application version embedded in the file names —meaning artists can work between different versions of Mari without the danger of corrupting their UI or preferences. Many preferences have had their groups, labels and tooltips modified to be easier to understand. All third-party libraries have been upgraded to match those specified by the VFX Reference Platform 2017.
Mari 4.0 is available now.

House of Moves add Selma Gladney-Edelman, Alastair Macleod

Animation and motion capture studio House of Moves (HOM) has strengthened its team with two new hires — Selma Gladney-Edelman was brought on as executive producer and Alastair Macleod as head of production technology. The two industry vets are coming on board as the studio shifts to offer more custom short- and long-form content, and expands its motion capture technology workflows to its television, feature film, video game and corporate clients.

Selma Gladney-Edelman was most recently VP of Marvel Television for their primetime and animated series. She has worked in film production, animation and visual effects, and was a producer on multiple episodic series at Walt Disney Television Animation, Cartoon Network and Universal Animation. As director of production management across all of the Discovery Channels, she oversaw thousands of hours of television and film programming including TLC projects Say Yes To the Dress, Little People, Big World and Toddlers and Tiaras, while working on the team that garnered an Oscar nom for Werner Herzog’s Encounters at the End of the World and two Emmy wins for Best Children’s Animated Series for Tutenstein.

Scotland native Alastair Macleod is a motion capture expert who has worked in production, technology development and as an animation educator. His production experience includes work on films such as Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers, The Matrix Reloaded, The Matrix Revolutions, 2012, The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn — Part 2 and Kubo and the Two Strings for facilities that include Laika, Image Engine, Weta Digital and others.

Macleod pioneered full body motion capture and virtual reality at the research department of Emily Carr University in Vancouver. He was also the head of animation at Vancouver Film School and an instructor at Capilano University in Vancouver. Additionally, he developed PeelSolve, a motion capture solver plug-in for Autodesk Maya.

Cinna 1.2

Storage in the Studio: VFX Studios

By Karen Maierhofer

It takes talent and the right tools to generate visual effects of all kinds, whether it’s building breathtaking environments, creating amazing creatures or crafting lifelike characters cast in a major role for film, television, games or short-form projects.

Indeed, we are familiar with industry-leading content creation tools such as Autodesk’s Maya, Foundry’s Mari and more, which, when placed into the hands of creatives, the result in pure digital magic. In fact, there is quite a bit of technological magic that occurs at visual effects facilities, including one kind in particular that may not have the inherent sparkle of modeling and animation tools but is just as integral to the visual effects process: storage. Storage solutions are the unsung heroes behind most projects, working behind the scenes to accommodate artists and keep their productive juices flowing.

Here we examine three VFX facilities and their use of various storage solutions and setups as they tackle projects large and small.

Framestore
Since it was founded in 1986, Framestore has placed its visual stamp on a plethora of Oscar-, Emmy- and British Academy Film Award-winning visual effects projects, including Harry Potter, Gravity and Guardians of the Galaxy. With increasingly more projects, Framestore expanded from its original UK location in London to North American locales such as Montreal, New York, Los Angeles and Chicago, handling films as well as immersive digital experiences and integrated advertisements for iconic brands, including Guinness, Geico, Coke and BMW.

Beren Lewis

As the company and its workload grew and expanded into other areas, including integrated advertising, so, too, did its storage needs. “Innovative changes, such as virtual-reality projects, brought on high demand for storage and top-tier performance,” says NYC-based Beren Lewis, CTO of advertising and applied technologies at Framestore. “The team is often required to swiftly accommodate multiple workflows, including stereoscopic 4K and VR.”

Without hesitation, Lewis believes storage is typically the most challenging aspect of technology within the VFX workflow. “If the storage isn’t working, then neither are the artists,” he points out. Furthermore, any issues with storage can potentially lead to massive financial implications for the company due to lost time and revenue.

According to Lewis, Framestore uses its storage solution — a Pixit PixStor General Parallel File System (GPFS) storage cluster using the NetApp E-Series hardware – for all its project data. This includes backups to remote co-location sites, video preprocessing, decompression, disaster recovery preparation, scalability and high performance for VFX, finishing and rendering workloads.

The studio moved all the integrated advertising teams over to the PixStor GPFS clusters this past spring. Currently, Framestore has five primary PixStor clusters using NetApp E-Series in use at each office in London, LA, Chicago and Montreal.

According to Lewis, Framestore partnered with Pixit Media and NetApp to take on increasingly complicated and resource-hungry VR projects. “This partnership has provided the global integrated advertising team with higher performance and nonstop access to data,” he says. “The Pixit Media PixStor software-defined scale-out storage solution running on NetApp E-Series systems brings fast, reliable data access for the integrated advertising division so the team can embrace performance and consistency across all five sites, take a cost-effective, simplified approach to disaster recovery and have a modular infrastructure to support multiple workflows and future expansion.”

BMW

Framestore selected its current solution after reviewing several major storage technologies. It was looking for a single namespace that was very stable, while providing great performance, but it also had to be scalable, Lewis notes. “The PixStor ticked all those boxes and provided the right balance between enterprise-grade hardware and support, and open-source standards,” he explains. “That balance allowed us to seamlessly integrate the PixStor into our network, while still maintaining many of the bespoke tools and services that we had developed in-house over the years, with minimum development time.”

In particular, the storage solution provides the required high performance so that the studio’s VFX, finishing and rendering workloads can all run “full-out with no negative effect on the finishing editors’ or graphic artists’ user experience,” Lewis says. “This is a game-changing capability for an industry that typically partitions off these three workloads to keep artists from having to halt operations. PixStor running on E-Series consolidates all three workloads onto a single IT infrastructure with streamlined end-to-end production of projects, which reduces both time to completion and operational costs, while both IT acquisition and maintenance costs are reduced.”

At Framestore, integrating storage into the workflow is simple. The first step after a project is green-lit is the establishment of a new file set on the PixStor GPFS cluster, where ingested footage and all the CG artist-generated project data will live. “The PixStor is at the heart of the integrated advertising storage workflow from start to finish,” Lewis says. Because the PixStor GPFS cluster serves as the primary storage for all integrated advertising project data, the division’s workstations, renderfarm, editing and finishing stations connect to the cluster for review, generation and storage of project content.

Prior to the move to PixStor/NetApp, Framestore had been using a number of different storage offerings. According to Lewis, they all suffered from the same issues in terms of scalability and degradation of performance under render load — and that load was getting heavier and more unpredictable with every project. “We needed a technology that scaled and allowed us to maintain a single namespace but not suffer from continuous slowdowns for artists due to renderfarm load during crunch times or project delivery.”

Geico

As Lewis explains, with the PixStor/NetApp solution, processing was running up to 270,000 IOPS (I/O operations per second), which was at least several times what Framestore’s previous infrastructure would have been able to handle in a single namespace. “Notably, the development workflow for a major theme-park ride was unhindered by all the VR preprocessing, while backups to remote co-location sites synched every two hours without compromising the artist, rendering or finishing workloads,” he says. “This provided a cost-effective, simplified approach to disaster recovery, and Framestore now has a fast, tightly integrated platform to support its expansion plans.”

To stay at the top of its game, Framestore is always reviewing new technologies, and storage is often part of that conversation. To this end, the studio plans to build on the success it has had with PixStor by expanding the storage to handle some additional editorial playback and render workloads using an all-Non-Volatile Memory Express (NVMe) flash tier. Other projects include a review of object storage technology for use as a long-term, off-premises storage target for archival data.

Without question, the industry’s visual demands are rapidly changing. Not long ago, Framestore could easily predict storage and render requirements for a typical project. But that is no longer the case, and the studio finds itself working in ever-increasing resolutions and frame rates. Whereas projects may have been as small as 3TB in the recent past, nowadays the studio regularly handles multiple projects of 300TB or larger. And the storage must be shared with other projects of varying sizes and scope.

“This new ‘unknowns’ element of our workflow puts many strains on all aspects of our pipeline, but especially the storage,” Lewis points out. “Knowing that our storage can cope with the load and can scale allows us to turn our attention to the other issues that these new types of projects bring to Framestore.”

As Lewis notes, working with high-resolution images and large renderfarms create a unique set of challenges for any storage technology that’s not seen in many other fields. The VFX will often test any storage technology well beyond what other industries are capable of. “If there’s an issue or a break point, we will typically find it in spectacular fashion,” he adds.

Rising Sun Pictures
As a contributor to the design and execution of computer-generated effects on more than 100 feature films since its inception 22 years ago, Rising Sun Pictures (RSP) has pushed the technical bar many times over in film as well as television projects. Based in Adelaide, South Australia, RSP has built a top team of VFX artists who have tackled such box-office hits as Thor: Ragnarok, X-Men and Game of Thrones, as well as the Harry Potter and Hunger Games franchises.

Mark Day

Such demanding, high-level projects require demanding, high-level effects, which, in turn, demand a high-performance, reliable storage solution capable of handling varying data I/O profiles. “With more than 200 employees accessing and writing files in various formats, the need for a fast, reliable and scalable solution is paramount to business continuity,” says Mark Day, director of engineering at RSP.

Recently, RSP installed an Oracle ZS5 storage appliance to handle this important function. This high-performance, unified storage system provides NAS and SAN cloud-converged storage capabilities that enable on-premises storage to seamlessly access Oracle Public Cloud. Its advanced hardware and software architecture includes a multi-threading SMP storage operating system for running multiple workloads and advanced data services without performance degradation. The offering also caches data on DRAM or flash cache for optimal performance and efficiency, while keeping data safely stored on high-capacity SSD (solid state disk) or HDD (hard disk drive) storage.

Previously, the studio had been using an Dell EMC Isilon storage cluster with Avere caching appliances, and the company is still employing the solution for parts of its workflow.

When it came time to upgrade to handle RSP’s increased workload, the facility ran a proof of concept with multiple vendors in September 2016 and benchmarked their systems. Impressed with Oracle, RSP began installation in early 2017. According to Day, RSP liked the solution’s ability to support larger packet sizes — now up to 1MB. In addition, he says its “exceptional” analytics engine gives introspection into a render job.

“It has a very appealing [total cost of ownership], and it has caching right out of the box, removing the need for additional caching appliances,” says Day. Storage is at the center of RSP’s workflow, storing all the relevant information for every department — from live-action plates that are turned over from clients, scene setup files and multi-terabyte cache files to iterations of the final product. “All employees work off this storage, and it needs to accommodate the needs of multiple projects and deadlines with zero downtime,” Day adds.

Machine Room

“Visual effects scenes are getting more complex, and in turn, data sizes are increasing. Working in 4K quadruples file sizes and, therefore, impacts storage performance,” explains Day. “We needed a solution that could cope with these requirements and future trends in the industry.”

According to Day, the data RSP deals with is broad, from small setup files to terabyte geocache files. A one-minute 2K DPX sequence is 17GB for the final pass, while 4K is 68GB. “Keep in mind this is only the final pass; a single shot could include hundreds of passes for a heavy computer-generated sequence,” he points out.

Thus, high-performance storage is important to the effective operation of a visual effects company like RSP. In fact, storage helps the artists stay on the creative edge by enabling them to iterate through the creative process of crafting a shot and a look. “Artists are required to iterate their creative process many times to perfect the look of a shot, and if they experience slowdowns when loading scenes, this can have a dramatic effect on how many iterations they can produce. And in turn, this affects employees’ efficiency and, ultimately, the profitability of the company,” says Day.

Thor: Ragnarok

Most recently, RSP used its new storage solution for work on the blockbuster Thor: Ragnarok, in particular, for the Val’s Flashback sequence — which was extremely complex and involved extensive lighting and texture data, as well as high-frame-rate plates (sometimes more than 1,000fps for multiple live-action footage plates). “Before, our storage refresh early versions of this shot could take up to 24 hours to render on our server farm. But since installing our new storage, we saw this drastically reduced to six hours — that’s a 3x improvement, which is a fantastic outcome,” says Day.

Outpost VFX
A full-service VFX studio for film, broadcast and commercials, Outpost VFX, based in Bournemouth, England, has been operational since late 2012. Since that time, the facility has been growing by leaps and bounds, taking on major projects, including Life, Nocturnal Animals, Jason Bourne and 47 Meters Down.

Paul Francis

Due to this fairly rapid expansion, Outpost VFX has seen the need for increased capacity in its storage needs. “As the company grows and as resolution increases and HDR comes in, file sizes increase, and we need much more capacity to deal with that effectively,” says CTO Paul Francis.

When setting up the facility five years ago, the decision was made to go with PixStor from Pixit Media and Synology’s NAS for its storage solution. “It’s an industry-recognized solution that is extremely resilient to errors. It’s fast, robust and the team at Pixit provides excellent support, which is important to us,” says Francis.

Foremost, the solution had to provide high capacity and high speeds. “We need lots of simultaneous connections to avoid bottlenecks and ensure speedy delivery of data,” Francis adds. “This is the only one we’ve used, really. It has proved to be stable enough to support us through our growth over the last couple of years — growth that has included a physical office move and an increase in artist capacity to 80 seats.”

Outpost VFX mainly works with image data and project files for use with Autodesk’s Maya, Foundry’s Nuke, Side Effects’ Houdini and other VFX and animation tools. The challenge this presents is twofold, both large and small: concern for large file sizes, and problems the group can face with small files, such as metadata. Francis explains: “Sequentially loading small files can be time-consuming due to the current technology, so moving to something that can handle both of these areas will be of great benefit to us.”

Locally, artists use a mix of HDDs from a number of different manufacturers to store reference imagery and so forth — older-generation PCs have mostly Western Digital HDDs while newer PCs have generic SSDs. When replacing or upgrading equipment, Outpost VFX uses Samsung 900 Series SSDs, depending on the required performance and current market prices.

Life

Like many facilities, Outpost VFX is always weighing its options when it comes to finding the best solution for its current and future needs. Presently, it is looking at splitting up some of its storage solutions into smaller segments for greater resilience. “When you only have one storage solution and it fails, everything goes down. We’re looking to break our setup into smaller, faster solutions,” says Francis.

Additionally, security is a concern for Outpost VFX when it comes to its clients. According to Francis, certain shows need to be annexed, meaning the studio will need a separate storage solution outside of its main network to handle that data.

When Outpost VFX begins a job, the group ingests all the plates it needs to work on, and they reside in a new job folder created by production and assigned to a specific drive for active jobs. This folder then becomes the go-to for all assets, elements and shot iterations created throughout the production. For security purposes, these areas of the server are only visible to and accessible by artists, who in turn cannot access the Internet; this ensures that the files are “watertight and immune to leaks,” says Francis, adding that with PixStor, the studio is able to set up different partitions for different areas that artists can jump between easily.

How important is storage to Outpost VFX? “Frankly, there’d be no operation without storage!” Francis says emphatically. “We deal with hundreds of terrabytes of data in visual effects, so having high-capacity, reliable storage available to us at all times is absolutely essential to ensure a smooth and successful operation.”

47 Meters Down

Because the studio delivers visual effects across film, TV and commercials simultaneously, storage is an important factor no matter what the crew is working on. A recent film project like 47 Meters Down required the full gamut of visual effects work, as Outpost VFX was the sole vendor for the project. So, the studio needed the space and responsiveness of a storage system that enabled them to deliver more than 420 shots, a number of which featured heavy 3D builds and multiple layers of render elements.

“We had only about 30 artists at that point, so having a stable solution that was easy for our team to navigate and use was crucial,” Francis points out.

Main Image: From Outpost VFX’s Domestos commercial out of agency MullenLowe London.


Saddington Baynes adds senior lighting artist Luis Cardoso

Creative production house Saddington Baynes has hired Luis Cardoso as a senior lighting artist, adding to the studio’s creative team with specialist CGI skills in luxury goods, beauty and cosmetics. He joins the team following a four-year stint at Burberry, where he worked on high-end CGI.

He specializes in Autodesk 3ds Max, Chaos Group’s V-Ray and Adobe Photoshop. Cardoso’s past work includes imagery for all Burberry fragrances, clothing and accessories and social media assets for the Pinterest Cat Lashes campaign. He also has experience under his belt as senior CG artist at Sectorlight, and later in his career Assembly Studios.

At Saddington Baynes, Cardoso will be working on new motion cinematic sequences for online video to expand the beauty, fragrance, fashion and beverage departments and take the expertise further, particularly in regards to video lighting.

According to executive creative director James Digby-Jones, “It no longer matters whether elements are static or moving; whether the brief is for a 20,000-pixel image or 4K animation mixed with live action. We stretch creative and technical boundaries with fully integrated production that encompasses everything from CGI and motion to shoot production and VR capability.”


Behind the Titles: Something’s Awry Productions

NAME: Amy Theorin

NAME: Kris Theorin

NAME: Kurtis Theorin

COMPANY: Something’s Awry Productions

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
We are a family owned production company that writes, creates and produces funny sharable web content and commercials mostly for the toy industry. We are known for our slightly offbeat but intelligent humor and stop-motion animation. We also create short films of our own both animated and live action.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Amy: Producer, Marketing Manager, Business Development
Kris: Director, Animator, Editor, VFX, Sound Design
Kurtis: Creative Director, Writer

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
Amy: A lot! I am the point of contact for all the companies and agencies we work with. I oversee production schedules, all social media and marketing for the company. Because we operate out of a small town in Pennsylvania we rely on Internet service companies such as Tongal, Backstage.com, Voices.com, Design Crowd and Skype to keep us connected with the national brands and talent we work with who are mostly based in LA and New York. I don’t think we could be doing what we are doing 10 years ago without living in a hub like LA or NYC.

Kris: I handle most of production, post production and some pre-production. Specifically, storyboarding, shooting, animating, editing, sound design, VFX and so on.

Kurtis: A lot of writing. I basically write everything that our company does, including commercials, pitches and shorts. I help out on our live-action shoots and occasionally direct. I make props and sets for our animation. I am also Something Awry’s resident voice actor.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
Amy: Probably that playing with toys is something we get paid to do! Building Lego sets and setting up Hot Wheels jumps is all part of the job, and we still get excited when we get a new toy delivery — who wouldn’t? We also get to explore our inner child on a daily basis.

Hot Wheels

Kurtis: A lot of the arts and crafts knowledge I gathered from my childhood has become very useful in my job. We have to make a lot of weird things and knowing how to use clay and construction paper really helps.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
Amy: See above. Seriously, we get to play with toys for a living! Being on set and working with actors and crew in cool locations is also great. I also like it when our videos exceed our client’s expectations.

Kris: The best part of my job is being able to work with all kinds of different toys and just getting the chance to make these weird and entertaining movies out of them.

Kurtis: Having written something and seeing others react positively to it.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
Amy/Kris: Working through the approval process with rounds of changes and approvals from multiple departments throughout a large company. Sometimes it goes smoothly and sometimes it doesn’t.

Kurtis: Sitting down to write.

WHAT IS YOUR MOST PRODUCTIVE TIME OF THE DAY?
Amy: Since most of the companies we work with are on the West Coast my day kicks into high gear around 4:00pm East Coast time.

Kris: I work best in the morning.

Kurtis: My day often consists of hours of struggling to sit down and write followed by about three to four hours where I am very focused and get everything done. Most often those hours occur from 4pm to 7pm, but it varies a lot.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
Amy: Probably helping to organize events somewhere. I am not happy unless I am planning or organizing a project or event of some sort.

Kris: Without this job, I’d likely go into some kind of design career or something involving illustration. For me, drawing is one of my secondary interests after filming.

Kurtis: I’d be telling stories in another medium. Would I be making a living doing it is another question.

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
Amy: I have always loved advertising and creative projects. When I was younger I was the advertising manager for PNC Bank, but left the corporate world when I had kids and started my own photography business, which I operated for 10 years. Once my kids became interested in film I wanted to foster that interest and here we are!

Kris: Filmmaking is something I’ve always had an interest in. I started when I was just eight years old and from there it’s always something I loved to do. The moment when I first realized this would be something I’d follow for an actual career was really around 10th grade, when I started doing it more on a professional level by creating little videos here and there for company YouTube channels. That’s when it all started to sink in that this could actually be a career for me.

Kurtis: I knew I wanted to tell stories very early on. Around 10 years old or so I started doing some home movies. I could get people to laugh and react to the films I made. It turned out to be the medium I could most easily tell stories in so I have stuck with it ever since.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
Amy: We are currently in the midst of two major projects — one is a six-video series for Hot Wheels that involves creating six original song music videos parodying different music genres. The other is a 12-episode series for Warner Bros. Scooby Doo that features live-action and stop-motion animation. Each episode is a mini-mystery that Scooby and the gang solve. The series focuses on the imaginations of different children and the stories they tell.

We also have two short animations currently on the festival circuit. One is a hybrid of Lovecraft and a Scooby-Doo chase scene called Mary and Marsha in the Manor of Madness. The other is dark fairytale called The Gift of the Woods.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
Amy: Although I am proud of a lot of our projects I am most proud of the fact that even though we are such a small company, and live in the middle of nowhere, we have been able to work with companies around the world like Lego, Warner Bros. and Mattel. Things we create are seen all over the world, which is pretty cool for us.

Lego

Kris: The Lego Yellow Submarine Beatles film we created is what I’m most proud of. It just turned out to be this nice blend of wacky visuals, crazy action, and short concise storytelling that I try to do with most of my films.

Kurtis: I really like the way Mary and Marsha in the Manor of Madness turned out. So far it is the closest we have come to creating something with a unique feel and a sense of energetic momentum; two long term goals I have for our work. We also recently wrapped filming for a twelve episode branded content web series. It is our biggest project yet and I am proud that we were able to handle the production of it really well.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
Amy: Skype, my iPad and the rise of online technology companies such as Tongal, Voices.com, Backstage.com and DesignCrowd that help us get our job done.

Kris: Laptop computers, Wacom drawing tablets and iPhones.

Kurtis: My laptop (and it’s software Adobe Premiere and Final Draft), my iPhone and my Kindle.

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
Amy: Being in this position I like to know what is going on in the industry so I follow Ad Age, Ad Week, Ad Freak, Mashable, Toy Industry News, iO9, Geek Tyrant, and of course all the social media channels of our clients like Lego, Warner Bros., Hot Wheels and StikBots. We also are on Twitter (@AmyTheorin) Instagram (@Somethingsawryproductions) and Facebook (Somethingsawry).

Kris: Mostly YouTube and Facebook.

Kurtis: I follow the essays of Film Crit Hulk. His work on screenwriting and story-telling is incredibly well done and eye opening. Other than that I try to keep up with news and I follow a handful of serialized web-comics. I try to read, watch and play a lot of different things to get new ideas. You never know when the spaghetti westerns of Sergio Leone might give you the idea for your next toy commercial.

DO YOU LISTEN TO MUSIC WHILE YOU WORK?
Amy: I don’t usually but I do like to listen to podcasts. Some of my favorites are: How I Built This, Yeah, That’s Probably an Ad and Fresh Air.

Kris: I listen to whatever pop songs are most popular at the time. Currently, that would be Taylor Swift’s “Look What You Made Me Do.”

Kurtis: I listen to an eclectic mix of soundtracks, classic rock songs I‘ve heard in movies, alternative songs I heard in movies, anime theme songs… basically songs I heard with a movie or game and can’t get out of my head. As for particular artists I am partial to They Might Be Giants, Gorillaz, Queen, and the scores of Ennio Morricone, Darren Korb, Jeff Williams, Shoji Meguro and Yoko Kanno.

IS WORKING WITH FAMILY EASIER OR MORE DIFFICULT THAN WORKING/MANAGING IN A REGULAR AGENCY?
Amy: Both! I actually love working with my sons, and our skill sets are very complimentary. I love to organize and my kids don’t. Being family we can be very upfront with each other in terms of telling our opinions without having to worry about hurting each other’s feelings.

We know at the end of the day we will always be there for each other no matter what. It sounds cliché but it’s true I think. We have a network of people we also work with on a regular basis who we have great relationships with as well. Sometimes it is hard to turn work off and just be a family though, and I find myself talking with them about projects more often than what is going on with them personally. That’s something I need to work on I guess!

Kris: It’s great because you can more easily communicate and share ideas with each other. It’s generally a lot more open. After a while, it really is just like working within an agency. Everything is fine-tuned and you have worked out a pipeline for creating and producing your videos.

Kurtis: I find it much easier. We all know how we do our best work and what our strengths are. It certainly helps that my family is very good at what they do. Not to mention working from home means I get to set my own hours and don’t have a commute. Sometimes it’s difficult to stay motivated when you’re not in a professional office setting but overall the pros far outweigh the cons.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
Amy: I try to take time out to walk our dog, but mostly I love it so much I don’t mind working on projects all the time. If I don’t have something to work on I am not a happy camper. Sometimes I have to remember that not everyone is working on the weekends, so I can’t bother them with work questions!

Kris: It really helps that I don’t often get stressed. At least, not after doing this job for as long as I have. You really learn how to cope with it all. Oftentimes, it’s more just getting exhausted from working long hours. I’ll often just watch some YouTube videos at the end of a day or maybe a movie if there’s something I really want to see.

Kurtis: I like to read and watch interesting stories. I play a lot games: board games, video games, table-top roleplaying. I also find bike riding improves my mood a lot.


Renegade Animation ups Brittney Jorgensen, focuses on original programming

With 12 series in its development pipeline targeting demographics from pre-school through teenagers, Renegade Animation has promoted Brittney Jorgensen to the newly-created post of head of marketing and development. Jorgensen will work with creators, writers and animators in developing concepts for animated television series and features, and serve as liaison with studios, broadcasters and streaming services.

Jorgensen, who joined Renegade in 2012 on the production side, also recently served as production manager on Being by Yourself, an animated short for the Imaginary Friend Society designed to help children with cancer cope with hospitalization. Previously, she was a production manager at Bento Box Entertainment. She also served in a production role at Disney Animation on Tron: Uprising.

Demand for quality, animated content is strong, says Renegade Animation creative director Darrell Van Citters. “With the growth in television and streaming production, now is the right time to focus attention on original programming.”

Renegade Animation has the resources to take shows from concept through delivery in-house. “We love to be involved from the very beginning,” says Jorgensen. “Talent may come to us with a script, a storyboard, a show bible, or just the germ of an idea. We work with creators to develop ideas so that they conform to our style and fit market demand.”


Behind the Title: Postal director of operations Jason Mayo

NAME: Jason Mayo

COMPANY: Postal

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
Postal is a VFX and animation studio made up of artists and producers that like to make cool shit. We experiment and push the envelope, but we’re also adults, so we get it done on time and on budget. Oh and we’re not assholes. That would be a cool t-shirt. “Postal: We’re not assholes.”

Postal is a creative studio that believes everything starts with great design. That’s our DNA. We believe that it’s always about the talent and not the tools. Whether it’s motion graphics, animation, visual effects, or even editorial, our desire to create transcends all mediums.

Postal’s live-action parent company, Humble is a NY- and LA-based home for makers —directors, writers, creatives, artists and designers — to create culture-defining content.

Coke Freestyle

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Director of Operations

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
I spend a lot of my time on biz dev, recruiting interesting talent and developing strategic partnerships that lead to new pipelines of business.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
Probably picking up garbage. Creatives are pretty messy. They leave their stuff all over the place. The truth of the matter is, it’s a small company so no matter what your title is, you’re always on the front lines. That’s what makes my days interesting.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
Definitely competing for projects we’re passionate about. I love the thrill of the chase. Also I love trying to keep our artists and producers inspired. Not every project needs to win awards but it’s important to me that my team finds the work interesting and challenging to tackle.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
Probably the picking up the garbage part. I’ve ruined a lot of shirts. I also hate seeing content on TV or on the web that could have been produced by us. Especially if it turned out killer.

WHAT IS YOUR MOST PRODUCTIVE TIME OF THE DAY?
I have two daughters and a puppy so by 8am I’m basically a broken man. But as soon as I hit the office with my iced coffee in hand, I’m on fire. I love the start of the workday. Endless possibilities abound.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
Probably a cool middle school English teacher. The kids would call me Jay and talk to me about their problems. Honestly though, when I’m done working I’ll probably just disappear into the woods or something and chase possums with a BB gun.

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
It was an accident. I wanted to be an actor. My mom’s best friend’s, ex-husband owned a small post house and he hired me as a receptionist. I was probably the greatest receptionist of all time. I thought being in “entertainment” would get me to Hollywood through the back door. I still have about 500 headshots that I never got to use.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
We’ve had such a crazy year. We’ve done projects for Pepsi, Coke, Panera, Morgan Stanley, TED, Canon, Billboard and Nike.

TED Zipline

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
I really love the TED stuff we do. They are a dream client. They come to us with a challenge and they allow us to go away, come up with some really imaginative stuff and then present them with a solution. As long as it’s on brief, it can be any style or any execution we think is right. We love that type of open collaboration with our clients.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
If we’re talking about apps, as well as hardware, then that’s easy. Sonos because it’s all about the music, Netflix because… zombies, and ride sharing apps because cabs are dirty and they make me nauseous.

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
In general, I’m pretty active on social media and we actually just launched Facebook and Instagram pages for Postal. In a parallel universe I’m a dad blogger so I’ve always been big on community via social media. Facebook, Instagram and Twitter are the standards for me, but I’ve been Snapchatting with my daughter for years. I do have a Pinterest page somewhere, but it’s devoted solely to Ryan Gosling.

DO YOU LISTEN TO MUSIC WHILE YOU WORK?
I’m a heavy metal guy so pretty much anything heavy. I do also love me some Jackson Browne and some Dawes. Oh, and the Pretty in Pink soundtrack, of course.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
I try not to let it get to me. It’s way tougher raising two daughters and two dogs. The rest is a cakewalk. I do binge eat from time to time and love to watch horror movies on the train. Always a good way for me to decompress.


Quick Chat: Creating graphics package for UN’s Equator Prize ceremony

Undefined Creative (UC) was recently commissioned by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) to produce a fresh package of event graphics for its Equator Prize 2017 Award Ceremony. This project is the latest in a series of motion design-centered work collaborations between the creative studio and the UN, a relationship that began when UC donated their skills to the Equator Prize in 2010.

The Equator Prize recognizes local and indigenous community initiatives from across the planet that are advancing innovative on-the-ground solutions to climate, environment and poverty challenges. Award categories honor achievement and local innovation in the thematic areas of oceans, forests, grasslands and wildlife protection.

For this year’s ceremony, UNDP wanted a complete refresh that gave the on-stage motion graphics a current vibe while incorporating the key icons behind its sustainable development goals (SDGs). Consisting of a “Countdown to Ceremony” screensaver, an opening sequence, 15 winner slates, three category slates and 11 presenter slates, the package had to align visually with a presentation from National Geographic Society, which was part of the evening’s program.

To bring it all together, UC drew from the SDG color palettes and relied on subject matter knowledge of both the UNDP and National Geographic in establishing the ceremony graphics’ overall look and feel. With only still photos available for the Equator Prize winners, UC created motion and depth by strategically intertwining the best shots with moving graphics and strategically selected stock footage. Naturally moving flora and fauna livened up the photography, added visual diversity and contributed creating a unique aesthetic.

We reached out to Undefined Creative’s founder/creative director Maria Rapetskaya to find out more:

How early did you get involved in the project, and was the client open to input?
We got the call a couple of months before the event. The original show had been used multiple times since we created it in 2010, so the client was definitely looking for input on how we could refresh or even rebrand.

Any particular challenges for this one?
For non-commercial organizations, budgets and messaging are equally sensitive topics. We have to be conscious of costs, and also very aware of Do’s and Don’t’s when it comes to assets and use. Our creative discussions took place over several calls, laying out options and ideas at different budget tiers — anything from simply updating the existing package to creating something entirely different. In case of the latter, parameters had to be established right away for how different “different” could be.

For example, it was agreed that we should stick with photography provided by the 2017 award winners. However, our proposal to include stock for flora and fauna was agreed on by all involved. Which SDG icons would be used and how, what partner and UN organizational branding should be featured prominently as design inspiration, how this would integrate with content being produced for UNDP/Equator Prize by Nat Geo… all of these questions had to be addressed before we started any real ideation in order for the creative to stay on brand, on message, on budget and on time.

What tools did you use on the project?
We relied on Adobe CC, in particular, After Effects, which is our staple software. In this particular project, we also relied heavily on stock from multiple vendors. Pond5 have a robust and cost-effective collection of video elements we were seeking.

Why is this project important to you?
The majority of our clients are for-profit commercial entities, and while that’s wonderful, there’s always a different feeling of reward when we have the chance to do something for the good of humanity at large, however minuscule our contribution is. The winners are coming from such different corners of the globe — at times, very remote. They’re incredibly excited to be honored, on stage, in New York City, and we can only imagine what it feels like to see their faces, the faces of their colleagues and friends, the names of their projects, up on this screen in front of a large, live audience. This particular event brings us a lot closer to what we’re creating, on a really empathetic, human level.


Tobin Kirk joins design/animation house Laundry as EP

Tobin Kirk has joined LA-based design and animation studio Laundry as executive producer. Kirk brings nearly 20 years of experience spanning broadcast design, main title sequences, integrated content, traditional on-air spots, branded content, digital and social. At Laundry, he will work closely with executive producer Garrett Braren on business development, as well as client and project management efforts.

Kirk was most recently managing executive producer at Troika, where he oversaw all production at the entertainment brand agency’s 25,000-square-foot facility in Hollywood, including its creative studio and live-action production subsidiary, Troika Production Group. Prior to that, he spent nearly five years as executive producer at Blind, managing projects for Xbox/Microsoft, AT&T, ancestry.com and Sealy Mattress, among others.

As a producer, Kirk’s background is highlighted by such projects as the main title sequence for David Fincher’s The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo at Blur Studio, commercials for Chrysler and Gatorade at A52 and an in-flight video for Method/Virgin America at Green Dot Films. He also spent three years with Farmer Brown working for TBS, CBS, Mark Burnett Productions, Al Roker Productions, The Ant Farm, Bunim/Murray and Endemol USA.

In addition, Kirk collaborated with video artist Bill Viola for over six years, producing projects for the London National Gallery, Athens Olympics, the Getty Museum, Opera National de Paris, Guggenheim Museum, Munich’s E.ON Corporation and Anthony d’Offay Gallery.

More speakers added for Italy’s upcoming View Conference

More than 50 speakers are confirmed for 2017’s View Conference, a digital media conference that takes place in Turin, Italy, from October 23-27. Those speakers include six visual effects Oscar winners, two Academy Sci-Tech award winners, animated feature film directors, virtual reality pioneers, computer graphics researchers, game developers, photographers, writers and studio executives.

“One of the special reasons to attend View is that our speakers like to stay for the entire week and attend talks given by the other speakers, so our attendees have many opportunities to interact with them,” says conference director Dr. Maria Elena Gutierrez. “View brings together the world’s best and brightest minds across multiple disciplines, in an intimate and collaborative place where creatives can incubate and celebrate.”

Newly confirmed speakers include:

Scott Stokdyk- This Academy Award winner (VFX supervisor, Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets) will showcase VFX from the film – from concept, design and inspiration to final color timing.

Paul Debevec – This Academy Award winner (senior staff engineer, Google VR, ICT) will give attendees a glimpse inside the latest work from Google VR and ICT.

Martyn Culpitt – A VFX supervisor on Logan and at Image Engine company, he will breakdown the film Logan, highlighting the visual effects behind Wolverine’s gripping final chapter.

Jan-Bart Van Beek – This studio art director at Guerrilla Games will take attendees through the journey that Guerrilla Games underwent to design the post-apocalyptic world of the game franchise, Horizon Zero Dawn.

David Rosenbaum – This chief creative officer at Cinesite Studios along with Cinesite EP Warren Franklin will present at talk titled, “It’s All Just Funny Business: Looking for IP, Talent ad Audiences.”

Elisabeth Morant – This product manager for Google’s Tilt Brush will discusses the company’s VR painting application in a talk called, “Real Decisions, Virtual Space: Designing for VR.”

Donald Greenberg – This professor of computer graphics at Cornell University will be discussing the “Next-gen of Virtual Reality”

Steve Muench – He will present “The Labor of Loving Vincent: Animating Van Gogh to Solve a Mystery.”

Deborah Fowler – This professor of visual effects at Savannah College of Art and Design/SCAD will showcase “Procedural and Production Techniques using Houdini.”

Daniele Federico: This co-founder and developer at Toolchefs will present “Make us Alive. An In-Depth Look at Atoms Crowd Software.”

Jason Bickerstaff – This character artist from Pixar Animation Studios) will present “Crossing The Dimensional Rift.”

Steve Beck – This VFX art director from ILM will discuss “The Future of Storytelling.”

Nancy Basi – She is executive director of the Film and Media Centre – Vancouver Economic Commission.

For a complete listing of speakers visit http://www.viewconference.it/speakers