Category Archives: 8K

MammothHD shooting, offering 8K footage

By Randi Altman

Stock imagery house MammothHD has embraced 8K production, shooting studio, macros, aerials, landscapes, wildlife and more. Clark Dunbar, owner of MammothHD, is shooting using the Red 8K VistaVision model. He’s also getting 8K submissions from his network of shooters and producers from around the world. They have been calling on the Red Helium s35 and Epic-W models.

“8K is coming fast —from feature films to broadcast to specialty uses, such as signage and exhibits — the Rio Olympics were shot partially in 8K, and the 2020 Tokyo Olympics will be broadcast in 8K,” says Dunbar. “TV and projector manufacturers of flat screens, monitors and projectors are moving to 8K and prices are dropping, so there is a current clientele for 8K, and we see a growing move to 8K in the near future.”

So why is it important to have 8K imagery while the path is still being paved? “Having an 8K master gives all the benefits of shooting in 8K, but also allows for a beautiful and better over-sampled down-rezing for 4K or lower. There is less noise (if any, and smaller noise/grain patterns) so it’s smoother and sharper and the new color space has incredible dynamic range. Also, shooting in RAW gives the advantages of working to any color grading post conforms you’d like, and with 8K original capture, if needed, there is a large canvas in which to re-frame.”

He says another benefit for 8K is in post — with all those pixels — if you need to stabilize a shot “you have much more control and room for re-framing.”

In terms of lenses, which Dunbar says “are a critical part of the selection for each shot,” current VistaVision sessions have used Zeiss Otus, Zeiss Makro, Canon, Sigma and Nikon glass from 11mm to 600mm, including extension tubes for the macro work and 2X doublers for a few of the telephotos.

“Along with how the lighting conditions affect the intent of the shot, in the field we use from natural light (all times of day), along with on-camera filtration (ND, grad ND, polarizers) with LED panels as supplements to studio set-ups with a choice of light fixtures,” explains Dunbar. “These range from flashlights, candles, LED panels from 2-x-3 inches to 1-x-2 foot panels, old tungsten units and light through the window. Having been shooting for almost 50 years, I like to use whatever tool is around that fits the need of the shot. If not, I figure out what will do from what’s in the kit.”

Dunbar not only shoots, he edits and colors as well. “My edit suite is kind of old. I have a MacPro (cylinder) with over a petabyte of online storage. I look forward to moving to the next-generation of Macs with Thunderbolt 3. On my current system, I rarely get to see the full 8K resolution. I can check files at 4K via the AJA io4K or the KiPro box to a 4K TV.

“As a stock footage house, other than our occasional demo reels, and a few custom-produced client show reels, we only work with single clips in review, selection and prepping for the MammothHD library and galleries,” he explains. “So as an edit suite, we don’t need a full bore throughput for 4K, much less 8K. Although at some point I’d love to have an 8K state-of-the-art system to see just what we’re actually capturing in realtime.”

Apps used in MammothHD’s Apple-based edit suite are Red’s RedCineX (the current beta build) using the new IPP2 pipeline, Apple’s Final Cut 7 and FCP X, Adobe’s Premiere, After Effects and Photoshop, and Blackmagic’s Resolve, along with QuickTime 7 Pro.

Working with these large 8K files has been a challenge, says Dunbar. “When selecting a single frame for export as a 16-bit tiff (via the RedCine-X application), the resulting tiff file in 8K is 200MB!”

The majority of storage used at MammothHD is Promise Pegasus and G-Tech Thunderbolt and Thunderbolt 2 RAIDs, but the company has single disks, LTO tape and even some old SDLT media ranging from FireWire to eSata.

“Like moving to 4K a decade ago, once you see it it’s hard to go back to lower resolutions. I’m looking forward to expanding the MammothHD 8K galleries with more subjects and styles to fill the 8K markets.” Until then Dunbar also remains focused on 4K+ footage, which he says is his site’s specialty.

2017 HPA Engineering Excellence Award winners

The HPA has announced the winners of the 2017 Engineering Excellence Award. Colorfront, Dolby, SGO and Red Digital Cinema will be awarded this year’s honor, which recognizes “outstanding technical and creative ingenuity in media, content production, finishing, distribution and/or archiving.”

The awards will be presented November 16, 2017 at the 12th annual HPA Awards show in Los Angeles.

The winners of the 2017 HPA Engineering Excellence Award are:

Colorfront Engine
An automatically managed, ACES-compliant color pipeline that brings plug-and-play simplicity to complex production requirements, Colorfront Engine ensures image integrity from on-set to the finished product.

Dolby Vision Post Production Tools
Dolby Vision Post Production Tools integrate into existing color grading workflows for both cinema and home deliverable grading, preserving more of what the camera originally captured and limiting creative trade-offs.

SGO’s Mistika VR
Mistika VR is SGO’s latest development and is an affordable VR-focused solution with realtime stitching capabilities using SGO’s optical flow technology.

Red’s Weapon 8K Vista Vision
Weapon with the Dragon 8K VV sensor delivers stunning resolution and image quality, and at 35 megapixels, 8K offers 17x more resolution than HD and over 4x more than 4K.

In addition, honorable mentions will also be awarded to Canon USA for Critical Viewing Reference Displays and Eizo for the ColorEdge CG318-4K.

Joachim Zell, who chairs the committee for this award, said, “Entries for the Engineering Excellence Award were at one of the highest levels ever, on a par with last year’s record breaker, and we saw a variety of serious technologies. The HPA Engineering Excellence Award is meaningful to those who present, those who judge, and the industry. It sounds a bit cliché to say that we had a very tight outcome, and it was a really competitive field this year. Congratulations to the winners and to the nominees for another great year.”

The HPA Awards will also recognize excellence in 12 craft categories, covering color grading, editing, sound and visual effects, and Larry Chernoff will receive the 2017 HPA Lifetime Achievement award.

Dell 6.15

Designed for large file sizes, Facilis TerraBlock 7 ships

Facilis, makers of shared storage solutions for collaborative media production networks, is now shipping TerraBlock Version 7. The new Facilis Hub Server, a performance aggregator that can be added to new and existing TerraBlock systems, is also available now. Version 7 includes a new browser-based, mobile-compatible Web Console that delivers enhanced workflow and administration from any connected location.

With ever-increasing media file sizes and 4K, HDR and VR workflows continually putting pressure on facility infrastructure, the Facilis Hub Server is aimed at future-proofing customers’ current storage while offering new systems that can handle these types of files. The Facilis Hub Server uses a new architecture to optimize drive sets and increase the bandwidth available from standard TerraBlock storage systems. New customers will get customized Hub Server Stacks with enhanced system redundancy and data resiliency, plus near-linear scalability of bandwidth when expanding the network.

According to James McKenna, VP of marketing/pre-sales at Facilis, “The Facilis Hub Server gives current and new customers a way to take advantage of advanced bandwidth aggregation capabilities, without rendering their existing hardware obsolete.”

The company describes the Web Console as a modernized browser-based and mobile-compatible interface designed to increase the efficiency of administrative tasks and improve the end-user experience.

Easy client setup, upgraded remote volume management and a more integrated user database are among the additional improvements. The Web Console also supports Remote Volume Push to remotely mount volumes onto any client workstations.

Asset Tracking
As the number of files and storage continue to increase, organizations are realizing they need some type of asset tracking system to aid them in moving and finding files in their workflow. Many hesitate to invest in traditional MAM systems due to complexity, cost, and potential workflow impact.

McKenna describes the FastTracker asset tracking software as the “right balance for many customers. Many administrators tell us they are hesitant to invest in traditional asset management systems because they worry it will change the way their editors work. Our FastTracker is included with every TerraBlock system. It’s simple but comprehensive, and doesn’t require users to overhaul their workflow.”

V7 is available immediately for eligible TerraBlock servers.

Check out our interview with McKenna during NAB:


Comprimato plug-in manages Ultra HD, VR files within Premiere

Comprimato, makers of GPU-accelerated storage compression and video transcoding solutions, has launched Comprimato UltraPix. This video plug-in offers proxy-free, auto-setup workflows for Ultra HD, VR and more on hardware running Adobe Premiere Pro CC.

The challenge for post facilities finishing in 4K or 8K Ultra HD, or working on immersive 360­ VR projects, is managing the massive amount of data. The files are large, requiring a lot of expensive storage, which can be slow and cumbersome to load, and achieving realtime editing performance is difficult.

Comprimato UltraPix addresses this, building on JPEG2000, a compression format that offers high image quality (including mathematically lossless mode) to generate smaller versions of each frame as an inherent part of the compression process. Comprimato UltraPix delivers the file at a size that the user’s hardware can accommodate.

Once Comprimato UltraPix is loaded on any hardware, it configures itself with auto-setup, requiring no specialist knowledge from the editor who continues to work in Premiere Pro CC exactly as normal. Any workflow can be boosted by Comprimato UltraPix, and the larger the files the greater the benefit.

Comprimato UltraPix is a multi-platform video processing software for instant video resolution in realtime. It is a lightweight, downloadable video plug-in for OS X, Windows and Linux systems. Editors can switch between 4K, 8K, full HD, HD or lower resolutions without proxy-file rendering or transcoding.

“JPEG2000 is an open standard, recognized universally, and post production professionals will already be familiar with it as it is the image standard in DCP digital cinema files,” says Comprimato founder/CEO Jirˇí Matela. “What we have achieved is a unique implementation of JPEG2000 encoding and decoding in software, using the power of the CPU or GPU, which means we can embed it in realtime editing tools like Adobe Premiere Pro CC. It solves a real issue, simply and effectively.”

“Editors and post professionals need tools that integrate ‘under the hood’ so they can focus on content creation and not technology,” says Sue Skidmore, partner relations for Adobe. “Comprimato adds a great option for Adobe Premiere Pro users who need to work with high-resolution video files, including 360 VR material.”

Comprimato UltraPix plug-ins are currently available for Adobe Premiere Pro CC and Foundry Nuke and will be available on other post and VFX tools soon. You can download a free 30-day trial or buy Comprimato UltraPix for $99 a year.


Post vet Katie Hinsen now head of operations at NZ’s Department of Post

Katie Hinsen, who many of you may know as co-founder of the Blue Collar Post Collective, has moved back to her native New Zealand and has been named head of operations at Aukland’s Department of Post.

Most recently at New York City’s Light Iron, Hinsen comes from a technical and operations background, with credits on over 80 major productions. Over a 20-year career she has worked as an engineer, editor, VFX artist, stereoscopic 3D artist, colorist and finishing artist on commercials, documentaries, television, music videos, shorts and feature films. In addition to Light Iron, she has had stints at New Zealand’s Park Road Post Production and Goldcrest in New York.

Hinsen has throughout her career been involved in both production and R&D of new digital acquisition and distribution formats, including stereoscopic/autostereoscopic 3D, Red, HFR, HDR, 4K+ and DCP. Her expertise includes HDR, 4K and 8K workflows.

“I was looking for a company that had the forward-thinking agility to be able to grow in a rapidly changing industry. New Zealand punches well above its weight in talent and innovation, and now is the time to use this to expand our wider post production ecosystem,” says Hinsen.

“Department of Post is a company that has shown rapid growth and great success by taking risks, thinking outside the box, and collaborating across town, across the country and across the world. That’s a model I can work with, to help bring and retain more high-end work to Auckland’s post community. We’ve got an increasing number of large-scale productions choosing to shoot here. I want to give them a competitive reason to stay here through Post.“

Department of Post was started by James Brookes and James Gardner in 2008. They provide offline, online, color, audio and deliverables services to film and television productions, both local and international.


Quick Chat: Josh Haynie Light Iron’s VP of US operations

Post services company Light Iron has named veteran post pro Josh Haynie to VP of US operations, a newly created position. Based in Light Iron’s Hollywood facility, Haynie will be responsible for leveraging the company’s resources across Los Angeles, New York, New Orleans and future locations.

Haynie joins Light Iron after 13 years at Efilm, where, as managing director, he maintained direct responsibility for all aspects of the company’s operations, including EC3 (on-location services), facility dailies, trailers, digital intermediate, home video and restoration. He managed a team of 100-plus employees. Previously, Haynie held positions at Sunset Digital, Octane/Lightning Dubs and other production and post companies. Haynie is an associate member of the ASC and is also actively involved in the HPA, SMPTE, and VES.

“From the expansion of Light Iron’s episodic services and New York facilities to the development of the color science in the new Millennium DXL camera, it is clear that the integration of Panavision and Light Iron brings significant benefits to clients,” says Haynie.

He was kind enough to take time out of his schedule to answer some of our questions…

Your title hints Light Iron opening up in new territories. Can you talk about this ? What is happening in the industry that this makes sense?
We want to be strategically located near the multiple Panavision locations. Productions and filmmakers need the expertise and familiarity of Light Iron resources in the region with the security and stability of a solid infrastructure. Projects often have splinter and multiple units in various locations, and they demand a workflow continuity in these disparate locations. We can help facilitate projects working in those various regions and offer unparalleled support and guidance.

What do you hope to accomplish in your first 6 to 12 months? What are your goals for Light Iron?
I want to learn from this very agile team of professionals and bring in operational and workflow options to the rapidly changing production/post production convergence we are all encountering. We have a very solid footing in LA, NY and NOLA. I want to ensure that each unit is working together using effective skills and technology to collaborate and allow filmmakers creative freedom. My goal is to help navigate this team though the traditional growth patterns as well as the unpredictable challenges that lie ahead in the emerging market.

You have a wealth of DI experience and knowledge. How has DI changed over the years?
The change depends on the elevation. From a very high level, it was the same simple process for many years: shoot, edit, scan, VFX, color — and our hero was always a film print. Flying lower, we have seen massive shifts in technology that have re-written the play books. The DI really starts in the camera testing phase and begins to mature during the production photography stage. The importance of look setting, dailies and VFX collaboration take on a whole new meaning with each day of shooting.

The image data that is captured needs to be available for near set cutting while VFX elements are being pulled within a few short days of photography. This image data needs to be light and nimble, albeit massive in file size and run time. The turnarounds are shrinking in the feature space exponentially. We are experiencing international collaboration on the finish and color of each project, and the final render dates are increasingly close to worldwide release dates. We are now seeing a tipping point like we encountered a few years back when we asked ourselves, “Is the hero a print or DCP?” Today, we are at the next hero question, DCP or HDR?

Do you have any advice for younger DI artists based on your history?
I think it is always good to learn from the past and understand how we got here. I would say younger artists need to aggressively educate themselves on workflow, technology, and collaboration. Each craft in the journey has experienced rapid evolvement in the last few years. There are many outlets to learn about the latest capture, edit, VFX, sound and distribution techniques being offered, and that research time needs to be on everyone’s daily task list. Seeking out new emerging creative talent is critical learning at this stage as well. Everyday a filmmaker is formulating a vision that is new to the world. We are fortunate here at Light Iron to work with these emerging filmmakers who share the same passion for taking that bold next step in storytelling.


Red shipping Epic-W and new Weapon cameras

Red Digital Cinema is shipping two new cameras — the Red Epic-W and the newest Weapon. Both feature the compact design of the DSMC2 form factor, as well as the new Helium 8K S35 sensor. Helium, Red’s latest sensor technology, allows for higher resolution in an S35 frame while maintaining the dynamic range found in the Red Dragon sensor.

The Epic-W 8K S35 captures 8K full-frame motion at up to 30fps, produces ultra-detailed 35.4 megapixel stills and offers Super 35 lens coverage. Epic-W is capable of data speeds up to 275 MB/s and is priced at $29,500 (for the camera Brain).

red_weapon_8k_s35The Weapon 8K S35 is the latest option in the Weapon line of cameras, featuring data speeds up to 300MB/s, the ability to capture 8K full frame motion at up to 60fps, and a sensor upgrade path to the Red Dragon 8K VV. It is available for the same price as the Weapon 6K with Red Dragon sensor, at $49,500 for the Brain.

“From the very beginning, we’ve strived to not only develop the best imaging technology on the planet, but also make it available to as many shooters as possible,” Says Jarred Land, President of Red Digital Cinema. “The Weapon remains our premier camera… and now comes with the option to either go with the 8K Helium sensor or 6K Dragon sensor.

Red is offering special pricing on these new cameras for registered Red camera owners — as well as those that have placed a deposit for Red Raven and Scarlet-W — starting at $14,500 for the Epic-W. Click here for more info.

In related news, Red has pre-announced that it will introduce an improved image processing pipeline, including new color science, in the coming weeks. These improvements will be available in-camera on all Brains with a Helium sensor, and will be available to all footage shot on Redcameras in post production. The new image processing pipeline will be made available soon via free firmware and software upgrades.

All of Red’s DSMC2 cameras shoot simultaneous RedCode RAW and Apple ProRes or Avid DNxHD/HR.

FMPX8.14

IBC 2016: VR and 8K will drive M&E storage demand

By Tom Coughlin

While attending the 2016 IBC show, I noticed some interesting trends, cool demos and new offerings. For example, while flying drones were missing, VR goggles were everywhere; IBM was showing 8K video editing using flash memory and magnetic tape; the IBC itself featured a fully IP-based video studio showing the path to future media production using lower-cost commodity hardware with software management; and, it became clear that digital technology is driving new entertainment experiences and will dictate the next generation of content distribution, including the growing trend to OTT channels.

In general, IBC 2016 featured the move to higher resolution and more immersive content. On display throughout the show was 360-degree video for virtual reality, as well as 4K and 8K workflows. Virtual reality and 8K are driving new levels of performance and storage demand, and these are just some of the ways that media and entertainment pros are future-zone-2increasing the size of video files. Nokia’s Ozo was just one of several multi-camera content capture devices on display for 360-degree video.

Besides multi-camera capture technology and VR editing, the Future Tech Zone at IBC included even larger 360-degree video display spheres than at the 2015 event. These were from Puffer Fish (pictured right). The smaller-sized spherical display was touch-sensitive so you could move your hand across the surface and cause the display to move (sadly, I didn’t get to try the big sphere).

IBM had a demonstration of a 4K/8K video editing workflow using the IBM FlashSystem and IBM Enterprise tape storage technology, which was a collaboration between the IBM Tokyo Laboratory and IBM’s Storage Systems division. This work was done to support the move to 4K/8K broadcasts in Japan by 2018, with a broadcast satellite and delivery of 8K video streams of the 2020 Tokyo Olympic Games. The combination of flash memory storage for working content and tape for inactive content is referred to as FLAPE (flash and tAPE).

The graphic below shows a schematic of the 8K video workflow demonstration.

The argument for FLAPE appears to be that flash performance is needed for editing 8K content and the magnetic tape provides low-cost storage the 8K content, which may require greater than 18TB for an hour of raw content (depending upon the sampling and frame rate). Note that magnetic tape is often used for archiving of video content, so this is a rather unusual application. The IBM demonstration, plus discussions with media and entertainment professionals at IBC indicate that with the declining costs of flash memory and the performance demands of 8K, 8K workflows may finally drive increased demand for flash memory for post production.

Avid was promoting their Nexis file system, the successor to ISIS. The company uses SSDs for metadata, but generally flash isn’t used for actual editing yet. They agreed that as flash costs drop, flash could find a role for higher resolution and richer media. Avid has embraced open source for their code and provides free APIs for their storage. The company sees a hybrid of on-site and cloud storage for many media and entertainment applications.

EditShare announced a significant update to its XStream EFS Shared Storage Platform (our main image). The update provides non-disruptive scaling to over 5PB with millions of assets in a single namespace. The system provides a distributed file system with multiple levels of hardware redundancy and reduced downtime. An EFS cluster can be configured with a mix of capacity and performance with SSDs for high data rate content and SATA HDD for cost-efficient higher-performance storage — 8TB HDDs have been qualified for the system. The latest release expands optimization support for file-per-frame media.

The IBC IP Interoperability Zone was showing a complete IP-based studio (pictured right) was done with the cooperation of AIMS and the IABM. The zone brings to life the work of the JT-NM (the Joint Task Force on Networked Media, a combined initiative of AMWA, EBU, SMPTE and VSF) and the AES on a common roadmap for IP interoperability. Central to the IBC Feature Area was a live production studio, based on the technologies of the JT-NM roadmap that Belgian broadcaster VRT has been using daily on-air all this summer as part of the LiveIP Project, which is a collaboration between VRT, the European Broadcasting Union (EBU) and LiveIP’s 12 technology partners.

Summing Up
IBC 2016 showed some clear trends to more immersive, richer content with the numerous displays of 360-degree and VR content and many demonstrations of 4K and even 8K workflows. Clearly, the trend is for higher-capacity, higher-performance workflows and storage systems that support this workflow. This is leading to a gradual move to use flash memory to support these workflows as the costs for flash go down. At the same time, the move to IP-based equipment will lead to lower-cost commodity hardware with software control.

Storage analyst Tom Coughlin is president of Coughlin Associates. He has over 30 years in the data storage industry and is the author of Digital Storage in Consumer Electronics: The Essential Guide. He also  publishes the Digital Storage Technology Newsletter, the Digital Storage in Media and Entertainment Report.