Category Archives: 4k

JVC GY-LS300CH camera offering 4K 4:2:2 recording, 60p output

JVC has announced version 4.0 of the firmware for its GY-LS300CH 4KCAM Super 35 handheld camcorder. The new firmware increases color resolution to 4:2:2 (8-bit) for 4K recording at 24/25/30p onboard to SDXC media cards. In addition, the IP remote function now allows remote control and image viewing in 4K. When using 4K 4:2:2 recording mode, the video output from the HDMI/SDI terminals is HD.

The GY-LS300CH also now has the ability to output Ultra HD (3840 x 2160) video at 60/50p via its HDMI 2.0b port. Through JVC’s partnership with Atomos, the GY-LS300CH integrates with the new Ninja Inferno and Shogun Inferno monitor recorders, triggering recording from the camera’s start/stop operation. Plus, when the camera is set to J-Log1 gamma recording mode, the Atomos units will record the HDR footage and display it on their integrated, 7-inch monitors.

“The upgrades included in our Version 4.0 firmware provide performance enhancements for high raster recording and IP remote capability in 4K, adding even more content creation flexibility to the GY-LS300CH,” says Craig Yanagi, product marketing manager at JVC. “Seamless integration with the new Ninja Inferno will help deliver 60p to our customers and allow them to produce outstanding footage for a variety of 4K and UHD productions.”

Designed for cinematographers, documentarians and broadcast production departments, the GY-LS300CH features JVC’s 4K Super 35 CMOS sensor and a Micro Four Thirds (MFT) lens mount. With its “Variable Scan Mapping” technology, the GY-LS300CH adjusts the sensor to provide native support for MFT, PL, EF and other lenses, which connect to the camera via third-party adapters. Other features include Prime Zoom, which allows shooters using fixed-focal (prime) lenses to zoom in and out without loss of resolution or depth, and a built-in HD streaming engine with Wi-Fi and 4G LTE connectivity for live HD transmission directly to hardware decoders as well as JVCVideocloud, Facebook Live and other CDNs.

The Version 4.0 firmware upgrade is free of charge for all current GY-LS300CH owners and will be available in late May.

Eizo intros DCI-4K reference monitor for HDR workflows

Eizo will be at NAB next week demonstrating its ColorEdge Prominence CG3145 31.1-inch reference monitor, which offers DCI-4K resolution (4096×2160) for pro HDR post workflows.

Eizo says the ColorEdge Prominence CG3145 can display both very bright and very dark areas on the screen without sacrificing the integrity of either. The monitor achieves the 1000cd/m (typical) high brightness level needed for an HDR content display. It can achieve a typical contrast ratio of 1,000,000:1 for displaying true blacks.

The ColorEdge Prominence CG3145 supports both the HLG (Hybrid Log-Gamma) and PQ (Perceptual Quantization) curves so post pros can rely on a monitor compliant with industry standards for HDR video.

The ColorEdge Prominence CG3145 supports various video formats, including HDMI input compatible with 10-bit 4:2:2 at 50/60p. The DisplayPort input supports up to 10-bit 4:4:4 at 50/60p. Additional features include 98 percent of the DCI-P3 color space smooth gradations with 10-bit display from a 24-bit LUT (look-up-table) and an optional light-shielding hood.
The ColorEdge Prominence CG3145 will begin shipping in early 2018.

In addition to the new ColorEdge Prominence CG3145 HDR reference monitor, Eizo currently offers optional HLG and PQ curves for many of its current CG Series monitors. The optimized gamma curves render images to appear more true to how the human eye perceives the real world compared to SDR. This HDR gamma support is available as an option for ColorEdge CG318-4K, CG248-4K, CG277 and CG247X. Both gamma curves were standardized by the ITU as ITU-R BT.2100. In addition, the PQ curve was standardized by SMPTE as ST-2084.

MTI 4.28

Quantum’s StorNext 6 targets high-res, scalable, global workflows

The industry’s ongoing shift to higher-resolution formats, its use of more cameras to capture footage and its embrace of additional distribution formats and platforms is putting pressure on storage infrastructure. For content creators and owners to take full advantage of their content, storage must not only deliver scalable performance and capacity but also ensure that media assets remain readily available to users and workflow applications. Quantum’s new StorNext 6 is engineered to address these requirements.

StorNext 6 will begin shipping with all newly purchased Xcellis and StorNext M-Series offerings, as well as Artico archive appliances, in early summer. It will be available at no additional cost for StorNext 5 users under current support contracts.

Leveraging its extensive real-world 4K testing and a series of 4K reference architectures developed from test data, Quantum’s StorNext platform provides scalable storage that delivers high performance using less hardware than competing systems. StorNext 6 offers a new quality of service (QoS) feature that empowers facilities to further tune and optimize performance across all client workstations, and on a machine-by-machine basis, in a shared storage environment.

Using QoS to specify bandwidth allocation to individual workstations, a facility can guarantee that more demanding tasks, such as 4K playback or color correction, get the bandwidth they need to maintain the highest video quality. At the same time, QoS allows the facility to set parameters ensuring that less timely or demanding tasks do not consume an unnecessary amount of bandwidth. As a result, StorNext 6 users can take on work with higher-resolution content and easily optimize their storage resources to accommodate the high-performance demands of such projects.

StorNext 6 includes a new feature called FlexSpace, which allows multiple instances of StorNext — and geographically distributed teams — located anywhere in the world to share a single archive repository, allowing collaboration with the same content. Users at different sites can store files in the shared archive, as well as browse and pull data from the repository. Because the movement of content can be fully automated according to policies, all users have access to the content they need without having it expressly shipped to them.

Shared archive options include both public cloud storage on Amazon Web Services (AWS), Microsoft Azure or Google Cloud via StorNext’s existing FlexTier capability and private cloud storage based on Quantum’s Lattus object storage or, through FlexTier third-party object storage, such as NetApp StorageGrid, IBM Cleversafe and Scality Ring. In addition to simplifying collaborative work, FlexSpace also makes it easy for multinational companies to establish protected off-site content storage.

FlexSync, which is new to StorNext 6, provides a fast and simple way to synchronize content between multiple StorNext systems that is highly manageable and automated. FlexSync supports one-to-one, one-to-many and many-to-one file replication scenarios and can be configured to operate at almost any level: specific files, specific folders or entire file systems. By leveraging enhancements in file system metadata monitoring, FlexSync recognizes changes instantly and can immediately begin reflecting those changes on another system. This approach avoids the need to lock the file systems to identify changes, reducing synchronization time from hours or days to minutes, or even seconds. As a result, users can also set policies that automatically trigger copies of files so that they are available at multiple sites, enabling different teams to access content quickly and easily whenever it’s needed. In addition, by providing automatic replication across sites, FlexSync offers increased data protection.

StorNext 6 also gives users greater control and selectivity in maximizing their use of storage on an ROI basis. When archive policies call for storage across disk, tape and the cloud, StorNext makes a copy for each. A new copy expiration feature enables users to set additional rules determining when individual copies are removed from a particular storage tier. This approach makes it simpler to maintain data on the storage medium most appropriate and economical and, in turn, to free up space on more expensive storage. When one of several copies of a file is removed from storage, a complementary selectable retrieve function in StorNext 6 enables users to dictate which of the remaining copies is the first priority for retrieval. As a result, users can ensure that the file is retrieved from the most appropriate storage tier.

StorNext 6 offers valuable new capabilities for those facilities that subscribe to Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA) rules for content auditing and tracking. The platform can now track changes in files and provide reports on who changed a file, when the changes were made, what was changed and whether and to where a file was moved. With this knowledge, a facility can see exactly how its team handled specific files and also provide its clients with details about how files were managed during production.

As facilities begin to move to 4K production, they need a storage system that can be expanded for both performance and capacity in a non-disruptive manner. StorNext 6 provides for online stripe group management, allowing systems to have additional storage capacity added to existing stripe groups without having to go offline and disrupt critical workflows.

Another enhancement in StorNext 6 allows StorNext Storage Manager to automate archives in an environment with Mac clients, effectively eliminating the lengthy retrieve process previously required to access an archived directory that contains offline files  which can number in the hundreds of thousands, or even millions.


Comprimato plug-in manages Ultra HD, VR files within Premiere

Comprimato, makers of GPU-accelerated storage compression and video transcoding solutions, has launched Comprimato UltraPix. This video plug-in offers proxy-free, auto-setup workflows for Ultra HD, VR and more on hardware running Adobe Premiere Pro CC.

The challenge for post facilities finishing in 4K or 8K Ultra HD, or working on immersive 360­ VR projects, is managing the massive amount of data. The files are large, requiring a lot of expensive storage, which can be slow and cumbersome to load, and achieving realtime editing performance is difficult.

Comprimato UltraPix addresses this, building on JPEG2000, a compression format that offers high image quality (including mathematically lossless mode) to generate smaller versions of each frame as an inherent part of the compression process. Comprimato UltraPix delivers the file at a size that the user’s hardware can accommodate.

Once Comprimato UltraPix is loaded on any hardware, it configures itself with auto-setup, requiring no specialist knowledge from the editor who continues to work in Premiere Pro CC exactly as normal. Any workflow can be boosted by Comprimato UltraPix, and the larger the files the greater the benefit.

Comprimato UltraPix is a multi-platform video processing software for instant video resolution in realtime. It is a lightweight, downloadable video plug-in for OS X, Windows and Linux systems. Editors can switch between 4K, 8K, full HD, HD or lower resolutions without proxy-file rendering or transcoding.

“JPEG2000 is an open standard, recognized universally, and post production professionals will already be familiar with it as it is the image standard in DCP digital cinema files,” says Comprimato founder/CEO Jirˇí Matela. “What we have achieved is a unique implementation of JPEG2000 encoding and decoding in software, using the power of the CPU or GPU, which means we can embed it in realtime editing tools like Adobe Premiere Pro CC. It solves a real issue, simply and effectively.”

“Editors and post professionals need tools that integrate ‘under the hood’ so they can focus on content creation and not technology,” says Sue Skidmore, partner relations for Adobe. “Comprimato adds a great option for Adobe Premiere Pro users who need to work with high-resolution video files, including 360 VR material.”

Comprimato UltraPix plug-ins are currently available for Adobe Premiere Pro CC and Foundry Nuke and will be available on other post and VFX tools soon. You can download a free 30-day trial or buy Comprimato UltraPix for $99 a year.


Sony intros extended-life SSDs for 4K or higher-bitrate recording 

Sony is expanding its media lineup with the introduction of two new G Series professional solid-state drives in 960GB (SV-GS96) and 480GB (SV-GS48) capacities. Sony says that these SSDs were designed to meet the growing need for external video recording devices docked to camcorders or high-performance DSLRs.

The new SSDs are an option for respective video recorders, offering videographers stable high-speed capabilities, a sense of security and lower cost of ownership due to their longer life. Using Sony’s Error Correction Code technology, the 960GB G Series SSD achieves up to 2400TBW (Terabytes Written), while the 460GB drive can reach 1200TBW, resulting in less frequent replacement and increased ROI. 2400TBW translates to about 10 years of use for the SV-GS96, if data is fully written to the drive an average of five times per week.

According to Sony, the drives are also designed for ultra-fast, stable data writing. Sony G Series SSDs feature built-in technology preventing sudden speed decreases, while ensuring stable recording of high-bitrate 4K video without frame dropping. For example, used with an Atomos Shogun Inferno, G Series SSDs are able to record video at 4K 60p (ProRes 422 HQ) mode stably.

When paired with the necessary connection cables, the new G Series drives can be effortlessly removed from a recorder and connected to a computer for file downloading, making editing easier and faster with read speeds up to 550MB/s.

G Series SSDs also offer data protection technology that keeps content secure and intact, even if a sudden power failure occurs. To add to the drive’s stability, it features a durable connector which withstands extreme repeated insertion and removal up to 3,000 times — or six times more tolerance than standard SATA connectors — even in harsh conditions.

Sony’s SSD G Series is expected to be available May 2017 at the suggested retail prices of $539 for SV-GS96 and $287 for SV-GS48.


Post vet Katie Hinsen now head of operations at NZ’s Department of Post

Katie Hinsen, who many of you may know as co-founder of the Blue Collar Post Collective, has moved back to her native New Zealand and has been named head of operations at Aukland’s Department of Post.

Most recently at New York City’s Light Iron, Hinsen comes from a technical and operations background, with credits on over 80 major productions. Over a 20-year career she has worked as an engineer, editor, VFX artist, stereoscopic 3D artist, colorist and finishing artist on commercials, documentaries, television, music videos, shorts and feature films. In addition to Light Iron, she has had stints at New Zealand’s Park Road Post Production and Goldcrest in New York.

Hinsen has throughout her career been involved in both production and R&D of new digital acquisition and distribution formats, including stereoscopic/autostereoscopic 3D, Red, HFR, HDR, 4K+ and DCP. Her expertise includes HDR, 4K and 8K workflows.

“I was looking for a company that had the forward-thinking agility to be able to grow in a rapidly changing industry. New Zealand punches well above its weight in talent and innovation, and now is the time to use this to expand our wider post production ecosystem,” says Hinsen.

“Department of Post is a company that has shown rapid growth and great success by taking risks, thinking outside the box, and collaborating across town, across the country and across the world. That’s a model I can work with, to help bring and retain more high-end work to Auckland’s post community. We’ve got an increasing number of large-scale productions choosing to shoot here. I want to give them a competitive reason to stay here through Post.“

Department of Post was started by James Brookes and James Gardner in 2008. They provide offline, online, color, audio and deliverables services to film and television productions, both local and international.


DP John Kelleran shoots Hotel Impossible

Director of photography John Kelleran shot season eight of the Travel Channel’s Hotel Impossible, a reality show in which struggling hotels receive an extensive makeover by veteran hotel operator and hospitality expert Anthony Melchiorri and team.

Kelleran, who has more than two decades experience shooting reality/documentary projects, called on Panasonic VariCam LT 4K cinema camcorders for this series.

eWorking for New York production company Atlas Media, Kelleran shot a dozen Hotel Impossible hour-long episodes in locations that include Palm Springs, Fire Island, Capes May, Cape Hatteras, Sandusky, Ohio, and Albany, New York. The production, which began last April and wrapped in December 2016, spent five days in each location.

Kelleran liked the VariCam LT’s dual native ISOs of 800/5000. “I tested ISO5000 by shooting in my own basement at night, and had my son illuminated only by a lighter and whatever light was coming through the small basement window, one foot candle at best. The footage showed spectacular light on the boy.”

Kelleran regularly deployed ISO5000 on each episode. “The crux of the show is chasing out problems in dark corners and corridors, which we were able to do like never before. The LT’s extreme low light handling allowed us to work in dark rooms with only motivated light sources like lamps and windows, and absolutely keep the honesty of the narrative.”

Atlas Media is handling the edit, using Avid Media Composer. “We gave post such a solid image that they had to spend very little time or money on color correction, but could rather devote resources to graphics, sound design and more,” concludes Kelleran.


Hollywood’s Digital Jungle moves to Santa Clarita

Digital Jungle, a long-time Hollywood-based post house, has moved its operations to a new facility in Santa Clarita, California, which has become a growing hub for production and post in the suburbs of Los Angeles. The new headquarters is now home to both Digital Jungle Post and its recent off-shoot Digital Jungle Pictures, a feature film development and production studio.

“I don’t mind saying, it was a bit of an experiment moving to Santa Clarita,” explains Digital Jungle president and chief creative Dennis Ho. “With so many filmmakers and productions working out here — including Disney/ABC Studios, Santa Clarita Studios and Universal Locations — this area has developed into a vast untapped market for post production professionals. I decided that now was a good time to tap into that opportunity.”

Digital Jungle’s new facility offers the full complement of digital workflow solutions for HD to 4K. The facility has multiple suites featuring Smoke, DaVinci Resolve, audio recording via Avid’s S6 console and Pro Tools, production offices, a conference area, a full kitchen and a client lounge.

Digital Jungle is well into the process of adding further capabilities with a new high-end luxury DI 4K theater and screening room, greenscreen stage, VFX bullpen, multiple edit bays and additional production offices as part of their phase two build-out.

Digital Jungle Post services include DI/color grading; VFX/motion graphics; audio recording/mixing and sound design; ADR and VO; HD to 4K deliverables for tape and data; DCI and DCDM; promo/bumper design and film/television title design.

Commenting on Digital Jungle Pictures, Ho says, “It was a natural step for me. I started my career by directing and producing promos and interstitials for network TV, studios and distributors. I think that our recent involvement in producing several independent films has enhanced our credibility on the post side. Filmmakers tend to feel more comfortable entrusting their post work to other filmmakers. One example is we recently completed audio post and DI for a new Hallmark film called Love at First Glance.”

In addition to Love at First Glance, Digital Jungle Productions’ recent projects include indie films Day of Days, A Better Place (available now on digital and DVD) and Broken Memories, which was screened at the Sedona Film Festival.

 


Mozart in the Jungle

The colorful dimensions of Amazon’s Mozart in the Jungle

By Randi Altman

How do you describe Amazon’s Mozart in the Jungle? Well, in its most basic form it’s a comedy about the changing of the guard — or maestro — at the New York Philharmonic, and the musicians that make up that orchestra. When you dig deeper you get a behind-the-scenes look at the back-biting and crazy that goes on in the lives and heads of these gifted artists.

Timothy Vincent

Timothy Vincent

Based on the novel Mozart in the Jungle: Sex, Drugs, and Classical Music by oboist Blair Tindall, the series — which won the Golden Globe last year and was nominated this year — has shot in a number of locations over its three seasons, including Mexico and Italy.

Since its inception, Mozart in the Jungle has been finishing in 4K and streaming in both SDR and HDR. We recently reached out to Technicolor’s senior color timer, Timothy Vincent, who has been on the show since the pilot to find out more about the show’s color workflow.

Did Technicolor have to gear up infrastructure-wise for the show’s HDR workflow?
We were doing UHD 4K already and were just getting our HDR workflows worked out.

What is the workflow from offline to online to color?
The dailies are done in New York based on the Alexa K1S1 709 LUT. (Technicolor On-Location Services handled dailies out of Italy, and Technicolor PostWorks in New York.) After the offline and online, I get the offline reference made with the dailies so I can look at if I have a question about what was intended.

If someone was unsure about watching in HDR versus SDR, what would you tell them?
The emotional feel of both the SDR and the HDR is the same. That is always the goal in the HDR pass for Mozart. One of the experiences that is enhanced in the HDR is the depth of field and the three-dimensional quality you gain in the image. This really plays nicely with the feel in the landscapes of Italy, the stage performances where you feel more like you are in the audience, and the long streets of New York just to name a few.

Mozart in the JungleWhen I’m grading the HDR version, I’m able to retain more highlight detail than I was in the SDR pass. For someone who has not yet been able to experience HDR, I would actually recommend that they watch an episode of the show in SDR first and then in HDR so they can see the difference between them. At that point they can choose what kind of viewing experience they want. I think that Mozart looks fantastic in both versions.

What about the “look” of the show. What kind of direction where you given?
We established the look of the show based on conversations and collaboration in my bay. It has always been a filmic look with soft blacks and yellow warm tones as the main palette for the show. Then we added in a fearlessness to take the story in and out of strong shadows. We shape the look of the show to guide the viewers to exactly the story that is being told and the emotions that we want them to feel. Color has always been used as one of the storytelling tools on the show. There is a realistic beauty to the show.

What was your creative partnership like with the show’s cinematographer, Tobias Datum?
I look forward to each episode and discovering what Tobias has given me as palette and mood for each scene. For Season 3 we picked up where we left off at the end of Season 2. We had established the look and feel of the show and only had to account for a large portion of Season 3 being shot in Italy. Making sure to feel the different quality of light and feel of the warmth and beauty of Italy. We did this by playing with natural warm skin tones and the contrast of light and shadow he was creating for the different moods and locations. The same can be said for the two episodes in Mexico in Season 2. I know now what Tobias likes and can make decisions I’m confident that he will like.

Mozart in the JungleFrom a director and cinematographer’s point of view, what kind of choices does HDR open up creatively?
It depends on if they want to maintain the same feel of the SDR or if they want to create a new feel. If they choose to go in a different direction, they can accentuate the contrast and color more with HDR. You can keep more low-light detail while being dark, and you can really create a separate feel to different parts of the show… like a dream sequence or something like that.

Any workflow tricks/tips/trouble spots within the workflow or is it a well-oiled machine at this point?
I have actually changed the way I grade my shows based on the evolution of this show. My end results are the same, but I learned how to build grades that translate to HDR much easier and consistently.

Do you have a color assistant?
I have a couple of assistants that I work with who help me with prepping the show, getting proxies generated, color tracing and some color support.

What tools do you use — monitor, software, computer, scope, etc.?
I am working on Autodesk Lustre 2017 on an HP Z840, while monitoring on both a Panasonic CZ950 and a Sony X300. I work on Omnitek scopes off the downconverter to 2K. The show is shot on both Alexa XT and Alexa Mini, framing for 16×9. All finishing is done in 4K UHD for both SDR and HDR.

Anything you would like to add?
I would only say that everyone should be open to experiencing both SDR and HDR and giving themselves that opportunity to choose which they want to watch and when.

Digital Anarchy’s new video sharpening tool for FCP X, Premiere and AE

Digital Anarchy has released Samurai Sharpen for Video, a sharpening tool for artists using Apple FCP X, Adobe After Effects and Adobe Premiere Pro. Samurai Sharpen is edge-aware sharpening software that uses a number of intelligent algorithms, as well as GPU acceleration to give users working with HD and 4K footage precise image quality control.

Samurai Sharpen provides video editors and colorists the ability to sharpen the details they want and be highly selective of those areas they want untouched. This means areas like skin tones or dark, noisy background areas, which usually do not look better sharpened, can be protected and not sharpened.

The built-in masks within the software allow editors and colorists to apply specific focus on areas within the video for sharpening, while avoiding dark, shadow areas and bright, highlight areas. This allows for maintaining pristine image quality throughout the shot. The edge-aware algorithm provides another level of masking by restricting the sharpening to only the significant details you choose. For example, enhancing details of an actor’s eyes while preventing areas like skin from being affected.

While the software supports After Effects, Premiere Pro and Final Cut Pro X currently, support for Avid and OpenFX is coming soon. Samurai Sharpen is available now. It’s regularly priced at $129, but Digital Anarchy is offering it for $99 until November 15.