Category Archives: 4k

MammothHD shooting, offering 8K footage

By Randi Altman

Stock imagery house MammothHD has embraced 8K production, shooting studio, macros, aerials, landscapes, wildlife and more. Clark Dunbar, owner of MammothHD, is shooting using the Red 8K VistaVision model. He’s also getting 8K submissions from his network of shooters and producers from around the world. They have been calling on the Red Helium s35 and Epic-W models.

“8K is coming fast —from feature films to broadcast to specialty uses, such as signage and exhibits — the Rio Olympics were shot partially in 8K, and the 2020 Tokyo Olympics will be broadcast in 8K,” says Dunbar. “TV and projector manufacturers of flat screens, monitors and projectors are moving to 8K and prices are dropping, so there is a current clientele for 8K, and we see a growing move to 8K in the near future.”

So why is it important to have 8K imagery while the path is still being paved? “Having an 8K master gives all the benefits of shooting in 8K, but also allows for a beautiful and better over-sampled down-rezing for 4K or lower. There is less noise (if any, and smaller noise/grain patterns) so it’s smoother and sharper and the new color space has incredible dynamic range. Also, shooting in RAW gives the advantages of working to any color grading post conforms you’d like, and with 8K original capture, if needed, there is a large canvas in which to re-frame.”

He says another benefit for 8K is in post — with all those pixels — if you need to stabilize a shot “you have much more control and room for re-framing.”

In terms of lenses, which Dunbar says “are a critical part of the selection for each shot,” current VistaVision sessions have used Zeiss Otus, Zeiss Makro, Canon, Sigma and Nikon glass from 11mm to 600mm, including extension tubes for the macro work and 2X doublers for a few of the telephotos.

“Along with how the lighting conditions affect the intent of the shot, in the field we use from natural light (all times of day), along with on-camera filtration (ND, grad ND, polarizers) with LED panels as supplements to studio set-ups with a choice of light fixtures,” explains Dunbar. “These range from flashlights, candles, LED panels from 2-x-3 inches to 1-x-2 foot panels, old tungsten units and light through the window. Having been shooting for almost 50 years, I like to use whatever tool is around that fits the need of the shot. If not, I figure out what will do from what’s in the kit.”

Dunbar not only shoots, he edits and colors as well. “My edit suite is kind of old. I have a MacPro (cylinder) with over a petabyte of online storage. I look forward to moving to the next-generation of Macs with Thunderbolt 3. On my current system, I rarely get to see the full 8K resolution. I can check files at 4K via the AJA io4K or the KiPro box to a 4K TV.

“As a stock footage house, other than our occasional demo reels, and a few custom-produced client show reels, we only work with single clips in review, selection and prepping for the MammothHD library and galleries,” he explains. “So as an edit suite, we don’t need a full bore throughput for 4K, much less 8K. Although at some point I’d love to have an 8K state-of-the-art system to see just what we’re actually capturing in realtime.”

Apps used in MammothHD’s Apple-based edit suite are Red’s RedCineX (the current beta build) using the new IPP2 pipeline, Apple’s Final Cut 7 and FCP X, Adobe’s Premiere, After Effects and Photoshop, and Blackmagic’s Resolve, along with QuickTime 7 Pro.

Working with these large 8K files has been a challenge, says Dunbar. “When selecting a single frame for export as a 16-bit tiff (via the RedCine-X application), the resulting tiff file in 8K is 200MB!”

The majority of storage used at MammothHD is Promise Pegasus and G-Tech Thunderbolt and Thunderbolt 2 RAIDs, but the company has single disks, LTO tape and even some old SDLT media ranging from FireWire to eSata.

“Like moving to 4K a decade ago, once you see it it’s hard to go back to lower resolutions. I’m looking forward to expanding the MammothHD 8K galleries with more subjects and styles to fill the 8K markets.” Until then Dunbar also remains focused on 4K+ footage, which he says is his site’s specialty.

Designed for large file sizes, Facilis TerraBlock 7 ships

Facilis, makers of shared storage solutions for collaborative media production networks, is now shipping TerraBlock Version 7. The new Facilis Hub Server, a performance aggregator that can be added to new and existing TerraBlock systems, is also available now. Version 7 includes a new browser-based, mobile-compatible Web Console that delivers enhanced workflow and administration from any connected location.

With ever-increasing media file sizes and 4K, HDR and VR workflows continually putting pressure on facility infrastructure, the Facilis Hub Server is aimed at future-proofing customers’ current storage while offering new systems that can handle these types of files. The Facilis Hub Server uses a new architecture to optimize drive sets and increase the bandwidth available from standard TerraBlock storage systems. New customers will get customized Hub Server Stacks with enhanced system redundancy and data resiliency, plus near-linear scalability of bandwidth when expanding the network.

According to James McKenna, VP of marketing/pre-sales at Facilis, “The Facilis Hub Server gives current and new customers a way to take advantage of advanced bandwidth aggregation capabilities, without rendering their existing hardware obsolete.”

The company describes the Web Console as a modernized browser-based and mobile-compatible interface designed to increase the efficiency of administrative tasks and improve the end-user experience.

Easy client setup, upgraded remote volume management and a more integrated user database are among the additional improvements. The Web Console also supports Remote Volume Push to remotely mount volumes onto any client workstations.

Asset Tracking
As the number of files and storage continue to increase, organizations are realizing they need some type of asset tracking system to aid them in moving and finding files in their workflow. Many hesitate to invest in traditional MAM systems due to complexity, cost, and potential workflow impact.

McKenna describes the FastTracker asset tracking software as the “right balance for many customers. Many administrators tell us they are hesitant to invest in traditional asset management systems because they worry it will change the way their editors work. Our FastTracker is included with every TerraBlock system. It’s simple but comprehensive, and doesn’t require users to overhaul their workflow.”

V7 is available immediately for eligible TerraBlock servers.

Check out our interview with McKenna during NAB:

Dell 6.15

Quick Chat: Endcrawl now supports 4K

By Randi Altman

Endcrawl, a web-based end credits service, is now supporting 4K. This rollout comes on the heels of an extensive testing period — Endcrawl ran 37 different 4K pilot projects on movies for Netflix, Sony and Filmnation.

Along with 4K support comes new pricing. All projects still start on a free-forever tier with 1K preview renders, and users can upgrade to 4K for $999 or 2K for $499.

We reached out to Endcrawl co-founder John “Pliny” Eremic to find out more about the upgrade to 4K.

You are now offering unlimited 4K renders in the cloud. Why was that an important thing to include in Endcrawl, and what does that mean for users?
We’ve seen a sharp rise in the demand for 4K and UHD finishes over the past 18 months. Some of this is driven by studios, like Netflix and Sony, but there’s plenty of call for 4K on the indie and short-form side as well.

Why cloud rendering?
Speed is a big reason. 4K renders usually turn around in less than an hour. 2K renders in half that time. You’d need a beefy rig to match that performance. Convenience is another reason. Offloading renders to the cloud eliminates a huge bottleneck. If you need that late-night clutch render it’s just a few clicks away. Your workflow isn’t tied to a single workstation somewhere… or to business hours.

That’s why we decided to make Endcrawl 100% cloud-based from day one. And, yes, I’d say that using SaaS tools in production is more or less completely normalized in 2017.

Endcrawl’s UI

Are renders really unlimited?
Yes, they are. Unlimited preview renders on the free tier. Unlimited 2K or 4K uncompressed for upgraded projects. We do reserve the right to cut off a project if someone is behaving abusively or just spamming the render engine for kicks.

Have you ever had to do that?
After more than 1,000 projects, this has come up exactly zero times.

Can you mention some films Endcrawl has been used on?
Moonlight, 10 Cloverfield Lane, Ava DuVernay’s 13th, Oliver Stone’s Snowden, Spike Lee’s Chi-Raq, Pride Prejudice & Zombies and Dirty Grandpa, and about 1,000 others.

What else should people know?
– It’s still really fast. 4K renders turn around in about an hour. That’s 60 minutes from clicking “render” until you (or your post house) see a download link to fresh, zipped DPX frames. I cannot overstate how much this comes in handy.
– File sizes are small. Even though a five-minute 4K sequence weighs in at around 250GB, those same frames zip up to just 2.2GB. That’s a compression ratio of more than 100:1. On a fast pipe, you’ll download that in minutes.
– All projects are 4K under the hood now. Even if you’re on a 1K or 2K tier, our engine initially typesets and rasterizes all renders in 4K.
– 4K is still tough on the desktop. Some applications start to run out of memory even on lengthy 2K credits sequences — to say nothing of 4K. Endcrawl eliminates those worries and adds collaboration, live preview and that speedy cloud render engine.


Canon targets HDR with EOS C200, C200B cinema cameras

Canon has grown its Cinema EOS line of pro cinema cameras with the EOS C200 and EOS C200B. These new offerings target filmmakers and TV productions. They offer two 4K video formats — Canon’s new Cinema RAW Light and MP4 — and are optimized for those interested in shooting HDR video.

Alongside a newly developed dual Digic DV6 image processing system, Canon’s Dual Pixel CMOS AF system and improved operability for pros, these new cameras are built for capturing 4K video across a variety of production applications.

Based on feedback from Cinema EOS users, these new offerings will be available in two configurations, while retaining the same core technologies within. The Canon EOS C200 is a production-ready solution that can be used right out of the box, accompanied by an LCD monitor, LCD attachment, camera grip and handle unit. The camera also features a 1.77 million-dot OLED electronic view finder (EVF). For users who need more versatility and the ability to craft custom setups tailored to their subject or environment, the C200B offers cinematographers the same camera without these accessories and the EVF to optimize shooting using a gimbal, drone or a variety of other configurations.

Canon’s Peter Marr was at Cine Gear demo-ing the new cameras.

New Features
Both cameras feature the same 8.85MP CMOS sensor that combines with a newly developed dual Digic DV6 image processing system to help process high-resolution image data and record video from full HD (1920×1080) and 2K (2048×1080) to 4K UHD (3840×2160) and 4K DCI (4096×2160). A core staple of the third-generation Cinema EOS system, this new processing platform offers wide-ranging expressive capabilities and improved operation when capturing high-quality HDR video.

The combination of the sensor and a newly developed processing system also allows for the support for two new 4K file formats designed to help optimize workflow and make 4K and HDR recording more accessible to filmmakers. Cinema RAW Light, available in 4K 60p/50p at 10-bit and 30p/25p/24p at 12-bit, allows users to record data internally to a CFast card by cutting data size to about one-third to one-fifth of a Cinema RAW file, without losing grading flexibility. Due to the reduced file size, users will appreciate rich dynamic range and easier post processing without sacrificing true 4K quality. Alongside recording to a CFast card, proxy data (MP4) can also be simultaneously recorded to an SD card for use in offline editing.

Additionally, filmmakers will also be able to export 4K in MP4 format on SD media cards at 60/50/30/25/24P at 8-bit. Support for UHD recording allows for use in cinema and broadcasting applications or scenarios where long recording times are needed while still maintaining top image quality. The digital cinema cameras also offer slow-motion full-HD recording support at up to 120fps.

The Canon EOS C200and Canon EOS C200B feature Innovative Focus Control that helps assist with 4K shooting that demands precise focusing, whether from single or remote operation. According to Canon, its Dual Pixel CMOS AF technology helps to expand the distance of the subject area to enable faster focus during 4K video recording. This also allows for highly accurate continuous AF and face detection AF when using EF lenses. For 4K video opportunities that call for precise focus accuracy that can’t be checked on an HD monitor, users can also take advantage of the LCD Monitor LM-V1 (supplied with the EOS C200 camera), which provides intuitive touch focusing support to help filmmakers achieve sophisticated focusing even as a single operator.

In addition to these features, the cameras offer:
• Oversampling HD processing: enhances sensitivity and helps minimize noise
• Wide DR Gamma: helps reduce overexposure by retaining continuity with a gamma curve
• ISO 100-102400 and 54db gain: high quality in both low sensitivity and low-light environments
• In-camera ND filter: internal ND unit allows cleaning of glass for easier maintenance
• ACESproxy support: delivers standardized color space in images, helping to improve efficiency
• Two SD card and one CFast card slots for internal recording
• Improved grip and Cinema-EOS-system-compatible attachment method
• Support for Canon Cine-Servo and EF cinema lenses

Editing and grading of the Cinema RAW Light video format will be supported in Blackmagic Resolve. Editing will also be possible in Avid Media Composer, using a Canon RAW plugin for Avid Media Access. This format can also be processed using the Canon application, Cinema RAW Development.

Also, Premiere Pro CC of Adobe will support this format until the end of 2017. Editing will also be possible in Final Cut Pro X from Apple, using the Canon RAW Plugin for Final Cut Pro X after the second half of this year.

The Canon EOS C200 and EOS C200B are scheduled to be available in August for estimated retail prices of $7,499 and $5,999, respectively. The EOS C200 comes equipped with additional accessories including the LM-V1 LCD monitor, LA-V1 LCD attachment, GR-V1 camera grip and HDU-2 handle unit. Available in September, these accessories will also be sold separately.


Pixelogic acquires Sony DADC NMS’ creative services unit

Pixelogic, a provider of localization and distribution services, has completed the acquisition of the creative services business unit of Sony DADC New Media Solutions, which specializes in 4K, UHD, HDR and IMF workflows for features and episodics. The move brings an expansion of Pixelogic’s significant services to the media and entertainment industry and provides additional capabilities, including experienced staff, proprietary technology and an extended footprint.

According to John Suh, co-president of Pixelogic, the acquisition “expands our team of expert media engineers and creative talent, extends our geographic reach by providing a fully established London operation and further adds to our capacity and capability within an expansive list of tools, technologies, formats and distribution solutions.”

Seth Hallen

Founded less than a year ago, Pixelogic currently employs over 240 worldwide and is led by industry veterans Suh and Rob Seidel. While the company is headquartered in Burbank, California, it has additional operations in Culver City, California, London and Cairo.

Sony DADC NMS Creative Services was under the direction of Seth Hallen, who joins Pixelogic as senior VP of business development and strategy. All Sony DADC NMS Creative Services staff, technology and operations are now part of Pixelogic. “Our business model is focused on the deep integration of localization and distribution services for movies and television products,” says Hallen. “This supply chain will require significant change in order to deliver global day and date releases with collapsed distribution windows, and by partnering closely with our customers we are setting out to innovate and help lead this change.”


Bluefish444 supports Adobe CC and 4K HDR with Epoch card

Bluefish444 Epoch video audio and data I/O cards now support the advanced 4K high dynamic range (HDR) workflows offered in the latest versions of the Adobe Creative Cloud.

Epoch SDI and HDMI solutions are suited for Adobe’s Premiere Pro CC, After Effects CC, Audition CC and other tools that are part of the Creative Cloud. With GPU-accelerated performance for emerging post workflows, including 4K HDR and video over IP, Adobe and Bluefish444 are providing a strong option for pros.

Bluefish444’s Adobe Mercury Transmit support for Adobe Creative Cloud brings improved performance in demanding workflows requiring realtime video I/O from UHD and 4K HDR sequences.

Bluefish444 Epoch video card support adds:
• HD/SD SDI input and output
• 4K/2K SDI input and output
• 12/10/8-bit SDI input and output
• 4K/2K/HD/SD HDMI preview
• Quad split 4K UHD SDI
• Two sample interleaved 4K UHD SDI
• 23, 24, 25, 29, 30fps video input and output
• 48, 50, 59, 60fps video input and output
• Dual-link 1.5Gbps SDI
• 3Gbps level A & B SDI
• Quad link 1.5Gbps and 3Gbps SDI
• AES digital audio
• Analog audio monitoring
• RS-422 machine control
• 12-bit video color space conversions

“Recent updates have enabled performance which was previously unachievable,” reports Tom Lithgow, product manager at Bluefish444. “Thanks to GPU acceleration, and [the] Adobe Mercury Transmit plug-in, Bluefish444 and Adobe users can be confident of smooth realtime video performance for UHD 4K 60fps and HDR content.”


JVC GY-LS300CH camera offering 4K 4:2:2 recording, 60p output

JVC has announced version 4.0 of the firmware for its GY-LS300CH 4KCAM Super 35 handheld camcorder. The new firmware increases color resolution to 4:2:2 (8-bit) for 4K recording at 24/25/30p onboard to SDXC media cards. In addition, the IP remote function now allows remote control and image viewing in 4K. When using 4K 4:2:2 recording mode, the video output from the HDMI/SDI terminals is HD.

The GY-LS300CH also now has the ability to output Ultra HD (3840 x 2160) video at 60/50p via its HDMI 2.0b port. Through JVC’s partnership with Atomos, the GY-LS300CH integrates with the new Ninja Inferno and Shogun Inferno monitor recorders, triggering recording from the camera’s start/stop operation. Plus, when the camera is set to J-Log1 gamma recording mode, the Atomos units will record the HDR footage and display it on their integrated, 7-inch monitors.

“The upgrades included in our Version 4.0 firmware provide performance enhancements for high raster recording and IP remote capability in 4K, adding even more content creation flexibility to the GY-LS300CH,” says Craig Yanagi, product marketing manager at JVC. “Seamless integration with the new Ninja Inferno will help deliver 60p to our customers and allow them to produce outstanding footage for a variety of 4K and UHD productions.”

Designed for cinematographers, documentarians and broadcast production departments, the GY-LS300CH features JVC’s 4K Super 35 CMOS sensor and a Micro Four Thirds (MFT) lens mount. With its “Variable Scan Mapping” technology, the GY-LS300CH adjusts the sensor to provide native support for MFT, PL, EF and other lenses, which connect to the camera via third-party adapters. Other features include Prime Zoom, which allows shooters using fixed-focal (prime) lenses to zoom in and out without loss of resolution or depth, and a built-in HD streaming engine with Wi-Fi and 4G LTE connectivity for live HD transmission directly to hardware decoders as well as JVCVideocloud, Facebook Live and other CDNs.

The Version 4.0 firmware upgrade is free of charge for all current GY-LS300CH owners and will be available in late May.


Eizo intros DCI-4K reference monitor for HDR workflows

Eizo will be at NAB next week demonstrating its ColorEdge Prominence CG3145 31.1-inch reference monitor, which offers DCI-4K resolution (4096×2160) for pro HDR post workflows.

Eizo says the ColorEdge Prominence CG3145 can display both very bright and very dark areas on the screen without sacrificing the integrity of either. The monitor achieves the 1000cd/m (typical) high brightness level needed for an HDR content display. It can achieve a typical contrast ratio of 1,000,000:1 for displaying true blacks.

The ColorEdge Prominence CG3145 supports both the HLG (Hybrid Log-Gamma) and PQ (Perceptual Quantization) curves so post pros can rely on a monitor compliant with industry standards for HDR video.

The ColorEdge Prominence CG3145 supports various video formats, including HDMI input compatible with 10-bit 4:2:2 at 50/60p. The DisplayPort input supports up to 10-bit 4:4:4 at 50/60p. Additional features include 98 percent of the DCI-P3 color space smooth gradations with 10-bit display from a 24-bit LUT (look-up-table) and an optional light-shielding hood.
The ColorEdge Prominence CG3145 will begin shipping in early 2018.

In addition to the new ColorEdge Prominence CG3145 HDR reference monitor, Eizo currently offers optional HLG and PQ curves for many of its current CG Series monitors. The optimized gamma curves render images to appear more true to how the human eye perceives the real world compared to SDR. This HDR gamma support is available as an option for ColorEdge CG318-4K, CG248-4K, CG277 and CG247X. Both gamma curves were standardized by the ITU as ITU-R BT.2100. In addition, the PQ curve was standardized by SMPTE as ST-2084.


Quantum’s StorNext 6 targets high-res, scalable, global workflows

The industry’s ongoing shift to higher-resolution formats, its use of more cameras to capture footage and its embrace of additional distribution formats and platforms is putting pressure on storage infrastructure. For content creators and owners to take full advantage of their content, storage must not only deliver scalable performance and capacity but also ensure that media assets remain readily available to users and workflow applications. Quantum’s new StorNext 6 is engineered to address these requirements.

StorNext 6 will begin shipping with all newly purchased Xcellis and StorNext M-Series offerings, as well as Artico archive appliances, in early summer. It will be available at no additional cost for StorNext 5 users under current support contracts.

Leveraging its extensive real-world 4K testing and a series of 4K reference architectures developed from test data, Quantum’s StorNext platform provides scalable storage that delivers high performance using less hardware than competing systems. StorNext 6 offers a new quality of service (QoS) feature that empowers facilities to further tune and optimize performance across all client workstations, and on a machine-by-machine basis, in a shared storage environment.

Using QoS to specify bandwidth allocation to individual workstations, a facility can guarantee that more demanding tasks, such as 4K playback or color correction, get the bandwidth they need to maintain the highest video quality. At the same time, QoS allows the facility to set parameters ensuring that less timely or demanding tasks do not consume an unnecessary amount of bandwidth. As a result, StorNext 6 users can take on work with higher-resolution content and easily optimize their storage resources to accommodate the high-performance demands of such projects.

StorNext 6 includes a new feature called FlexSpace, which allows multiple instances of StorNext — and geographically distributed teams — located anywhere in the world to share a single archive repository, allowing collaboration with the same content. Users at different sites can store files in the shared archive, as well as browse and pull data from the repository. Because the movement of content can be fully automated according to policies, all users have access to the content they need without having it expressly shipped to them.

Shared archive options include both public cloud storage on Amazon Web Services (AWS), Microsoft Azure or Google Cloud via StorNext’s existing FlexTier capability and private cloud storage based on Quantum’s Lattus object storage or, through FlexTier third-party object storage, such as NetApp StorageGrid, IBM Cleversafe and Scality Ring. In addition to simplifying collaborative work, FlexSpace also makes it easy for multinational companies to establish protected off-site content storage.

FlexSync, which is new to StorNext 6, provides a fast and simple way to synchronize content between multiple StorNext systems that is highly manageable and automated. FlexSync supports one-to-one, one-to-many and many-to-one file replication scenarios and can be configured to operate at almost any level: specific files, specific folders or entire file systems. By leveraging enhancements in file system metadata monitoring, FlexSync recognizes changes instantly and can immediately begin reflecting those changes on another system. This approach avoids the need to lock the file systems to identify changes, reducing synchronization time from hours or days to minutes, or even seconds. As a result, users can also set policies that automatically trigger copies of files so that they are available at multiple sites, enabling different teams to access content quickly and easily whenever it’s needed. In addition, by providing automatic replication across sites, FlexSync offers increased data protection.

StorNext 6 also gives users greater control and selectivity in maximizing their use of storage on an ROI basis. When archive policies call for storage across disk, tape and the cloud, StorNext makes a copy for each. A new copy expiration feature enables users to set additional rules determining when individual copies are removed from a particular storage tier. This approach makes it simpler to maintain data on the storage medium most appropriate and economical and, in turn, to free up space on more expensive storage. When one of several copies of a file is removed from storage, a complementary selectable retrieve function in StorNext 6 enables users to dictate which of the remaining copies is the first priority for retrieval. As a result, users can ensure that the file is retrieved from the most appropriate storage tier.

StorNext 6 offers valuable new capabilities for those facilities that subscribe to Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA) rules for content auditing and tracking. The platform can now track changes in files and provide reports on who changed a file, when the changes were made, what was changed and whether and to where a file was moved. With this knowledge, a facility can see exactly how its team handled specific files and also provide its clients with details about how files were managed during production.

As facilities begin to move to 4K production, they need a storage system that can be expanded for both performance and capacity in a non-disruptive manner. StorNext 6 provides for online stripe group management, allowing systems to have additional storage capacity added to existing stripe groups without having to go offline and disrupt critical workflows.

Another enhancement in StorNext 6 allows StorNext Storage Manager to automate archives in an environment with Mac clients, effectively eliminating the lengthy retrieve process previously required to access an archived directory that contains offline files  which can number in the hundreds of thousands, or even millions.

Comprimato plug-in manages Ultra HD, VR files within Premiere

Comprimato, makers of GPU-accelerated storage compression and video transcoding solutions, has launched Comprimato UltraPix. This video plug-in offers proxy-free, auto-setup workflows for Ultra HD, VR and more on hardware running Adobe Premiere Pro CC.

The challenge for post facilities finishing in 4K or 8K Ultra HD, or working on immersive 360­ VR projects, is managing the massive amount of data. The files are large, requiring a lot of expensive storage, which can be slow and cumbersome to load, and achieving realtime editing performance is difficult.

Comprimato UltraPix addresses this, building on JPEG2000, a compression format that offers high image quality (including mathematically lossless mode) to generate smaller versions of each frame as an inherent part of the compression process. Comprimato UltraPix delivers the file at a size that the user’s hardware can accommodate.

Once Comprimato UltraPix is loaded on any hardware, it configures itself with auto-setup, requiring no specialist knowledge from the editor who continues to work in Premiere Pro CC exactly as normal. Any workflow can be boosted by Comprimato UltraPix, and the larger the files the greater the benefit.

Comprimato UltraPix is a multi-platform video processing software for instant video resolution in realtime. It is a lightweight, downloadable video plug-in for OS X, Windows and Linux systems. Editors can switch between 4K, 8K, full HD, HD or lower resolutions without proxy-file rendering or transcoding.

“JPEG2000 is an open standard, recognized universally, and post production professionals will already be familiar with it as it is the image standard in DCP digital cinema files,” says Comprimato founder/CEO Jirˇí Matela. “What we have achieved is a unique implementation of JPEG2000 encoding and decoding in software, using the power of the CPU or GPU, which means we can embed it in realtime editing tools like Adobe Premiere Pro CC. It solves a real issue, simply and effectively.”

“Editors and post professionals need tools that integrate ‘under the hood’ so they can focus on content creation and not technology,” says Sue Skidmore, partner relations for Adobe. “Comprimato adds a great option for Adobe Premiere Pro users who need to work with high-resolution video files, including 360 VR material.”

Comprimato UltraPix plug-ins are currently available for Adobe Premiere Pro CC and Foundry Nuke and will be available on other post and VFX tools soon. You can download a free 30-day trial or buy Comprimato UltraPix for $99 a year.