Category Archives: 360

Director Ava DuVernay named VES Summit’s keynote speaker

Director/producer/writer Ava DuVernay has been named keynote speaker at the 2017 VES Summit, “Inspiring Change: Building on 20 Years of VES Innovation.” The forum, which takes place Saturday, October 28, celebrates the Visual Effects Society’s 20th anniversary and brings together creatives, executives and visionaries from a variety of disciplines to discuss the evolution of visual imagery and the VFX industry landscape in a TED Talks-like atmosphere.

At the 2012 Sundance Film Festival, DuVernay won the Best Director Prize for her second feature film Middle of Nowhere, which she also wrote and produced. For her work on Selma in 2014, she was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Picture. In 2017, she was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Documentary Feature for her film 13th. Her current directorial work includes the dramatic television series Queen Sugar, and the upcoming Disney feature film A Wrinkle in Time.

It was back in 2010 that DuVernay made her directorial debut with the acclaimed 2008 hip-hop documentary This Is The Life, and she has gone on to direct several network documentaries, including Venus Vs. for ESPN. She has also directed significant short form work, including August 28: A Day in the Life of a People, commissioned by The Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture, as well as fashion and beauty films for Prada and Apple.

Other speakers include:
–  Syd Mead, visual futurist and conceptual artist
–  President of IMAX Home Entertainment Jason Brenek on “Evolution in Entertainment: VR, Cinema and Beyond”
– CEO of SSP BlueHemanshu Nigam on “When Hackers Attack: How Can Hollywood Fight Back?”
– Head of Adobe Research Gavin Miller on “Will the Future Look More Like Harry Potter or Star Trek?”
–  Senior research engineer at Autodesk, Evan Atherton on “The Age of Imagination”
–  Founder/CEO of the Emblematic Group, Nonny de la Peña on “Creating for Virtual, Augmented and Mixed Realities”

Additional speakers and roundtable moderators will be announced soon. The 2017 VES Summit takes place at the Sofitel Hotel Beverly Hills.

Maxon debuts Cinema 4D Release 19 at SIGGRAPH

Maxon was at this year’s SIGGRAPH in Los Angeles showing Cinema 4D Release 19 (R19). This next-generation of Maxon’s pro 3D app offers a new viewport and a new Sound Effector, and additional features for Voronoi Fracturing have been added to the MoGraph toolset. It also boasts a new Spherical Camera, the integration of AMD’s ProRender technology and more. Designed to serve individual artists as well as large studio environments, Release 19 offers a streamlined workflow for general design, motion graphics, VFX, VR/AR and all types of visualization.

With Cinema 4D Release 19, Maxon also introduced a few re-engineered foundational technologies, which the company will continue to develop in future versions. These include core software modernization efforts, a new modeling core, integrated GPU rendering for Windows and Mac, and OpenGL capabilities in BodyPaint 3D, Maxon’s pro paint and texturing toolset.

More details on the offerings in R19:
Viewport Improvements provide artists with added support for screen-space reflections and OpenGL depth-of-field, in addition to the screen-space ambient occlusion and tessellation features (added in R18). Results are so close to final render that client previews can be output using the new native MP4 video support.

MoGraph enhancements expand on Cinema 4D’s toolset for motion graphics with faster results and added workflow capabilities in Voronoi Fracturing, such as the ability to break objects progressively, add displaced noise details for improved realism or glue multiple fracture pieces together more quickly for complex shape creation. An all-new Sound Effector in R19 allows artists to create audio-reactive animations based on multiple frequencies from a single sound file.

The new Spherical Camera allows artists to render stereoscopic 360° virtual reality videos and dome projections. Artists can specify a latitude and longitude range, and render in equirectangular, cubic string, cubic cross or 3×2 cubic format. The new spherical camera also includes stereo rendering with pole smoothing to minimize distortion.

New Polygon Reduction works as a generator, so it’s easy to reduce entire hierarchies. The reduction is pre-calculated, so adjusting the reduction strength or desired vertex count is extremely fast. The new Polygon Reduction preserves vertex maps, selection tags and UV coordinates, ensuring textures continue to map properly and providing control over areas where polygon detail is preserved.

Level of Detail (LOD) Object features a new interface element that lets customers define and manage settings to maximize viewport and render speed, create new types of animations or prepare optimized assets for game workflows. Level of Detail data exports via the FBX 3D file exchange format for use in popular game engines.

AMD’s Radeon ProRender technology is now seamlessly integrated into R19, providing artists a cross-platform GPU rendering solution. Though just the first phase of integration, it provides a useful glimpse into the power ProRender will eventually provide as more features and deeper Cinema 4D integration are added in future releases.

Modernization efforts in R19 reflect Maxon’s development legacy and offer the first glimpse into the company’s planned ‘under-the-hood’ future efforts to modernize the software, as follows:

  • Revamped Media Core gives Cinema 4D R19 users a completely rewritten software core to increase speed and memory efficiency for image, video and audio formats. Native support for MP4 video without QuickTime delivers advantages to preview renders, incorporate video as textures or motion track footage for a more robust workflow. Export for production formats, such as OpenEXR and DDS, has also been improved.
  • Robust Modeling offers a new modeling core with improved support for edges and N-gons can be seen in the Align and Reverse Normals commands. More modeling tools and generators will directly use this new core in future versions.
  • BodyPaint 3D now uses an OpenGL painting engine giving R19 artists painting color and adding surface details in film, game design and other workflows, a real-time display of reflections, alpha, bump or normal, and even displacement, for improved visual feedback and texture painting. Redevelopment efforts to improve the UV editing toolset in Cinema 4D continue with the first-fruits of this work available in R19 for faster and more efficient options to convert point and polygon selections, grow and shrink UV point selects, and more.
Dell 6.15

Quick Look: Jaunt One’s 360 camera

By Claudio Santos

To those who have been following the virtual reality market from the beginning, one very interesting phenomenon is how the hardware development seems to have outpaced both the content creation and the software development. The industry has been in a constant state of excitement over the release of new and improved hardware that pushes the capabilities of the medium, and content creators are still scrambling to experiment and learn how to use the new technologies.

One of the products of this tech boom is the Jaunt One camera. It is a 360 camera that was developed with the explicit focus of addressing the many production complexities that plague real life field shooting. What do I mean by that? Well, the camera quickly disassembles and allows you to replace a broken camera module. After all, when you’re across the world and the elephant that is standing in your shot decides to play with the camera, it is quite useful to be able to quickly swap parts instead of having to replace the whole camera or sending it in for repair from the middle of the jungle.

Another of the main selling points of the Jaunt One camera is the streamlined cloud finishing service they provide. It takes the content creator all the way from shooting on set through stitching, editing, onlining and preparing the different deliverables for all the different publishing platforms available. The pipeline is also flexible enough to allow you to bring your footage in and out of the service at any point so you can pick and choose what services you want to use. You could, for example, do your own stitching in Nuke, AVP or any other software and use the Jaunt cloud service to edit and online these stitched videos.

The Jaunt One camera takes a few important details into consideration, such as the synchronization of all of the shutters in the lenses. This prevents stitching abnormalities in fast moving objects that are captured in different moments in time by adjacent lenses.

The camera doesn’t have an internal ambisonics microphone but the cloud service supports ambisonic recordings made in a dual system or Dolby Atmos. It was interesting to notice that one of the toolset apps they released was the Jaunt Slate, a tool that allows for easy slating on all the cameras (without having to run around the camera like a child, clapping repeatedly) and is meant to automatize the synchronization of the separate audio recordings in post.

The Jaunt One camera shows that the market is maturing past its initial DIY stage and the demand for reliable, robust solutions for higher budget productions is now significant enough to attract developers such as Jaunt. Let’s hope tools such as these encourage more and more filmmakers to produce new content in VR.


PNY’s PrevailPro mobile workstations feature 4K displays, are VR-capable

PNY has launched the PNY PrevailPro P4000 and P3000, thin and light mobile workstations. With their Nvidia Max-Q design, these innovative systems are designed from the Quadro GPU out.

“Our PrevailPro [has] the ability to drive up to four 4K UHD displays at once, or render vividly interactive VR experiences, without breaking backs or budgets,” says Steven Kaner, VP of commercial and OEM sales at PNY Technologies. “The increasing power efficiency of Nvidia Quadro graphics and our P4000-based P955 Nvidia Max-Q technology platform, allows PNY to deliver professional performance and features in thin, light, cool and quiet form factors.”

P3000

PrevailPro features the Pascal architecture within the P4000 and P3000 mobile GPUs, with Intel Core i7-7700HQ CPUs and the HM175 Express chipset.

“Despite ever increasing mobility, creative professionals require workstation class performance and features from their mobile laptops to accomplish their best work, from any location,” says Bob Pette, VP, Nvidia Professional Visualization. “With our new Max-Q design and powered by Quadro P4000 and P3000 mobile GPUs, PNY’s new PrevailPro lineup offers incredibly light and thin, no-compromise, powerful and versatile mobile workstations.”

The PrevailPro systems feature either a 15.6-inch 4K UHD or FHD display – and the ability to drive three external displays (2x mDP 1.4 and HDMI 2.0 with HDCP), for a total of four simultaneously active displays. The P4000 version supports fully immersive VR, the Nvidia VRWorks software development kit and innovative immersive VR environments based on the Unreal or Unity engines.

With 8GB (P4000) or 6GB (P3000) of GDDR5 GPU memory, up to 32GB of DDR4 2400MHz DRAM, 512GB SSD availability, HDD options up to 2TB, a comprehensive array of I/O ports, and the latest Wi-Fi and Bluetooth implementations, PrevailPro is compatible with all commonly used peripherals and network environments — and provides pros with the interfaces and storage capacity needed to complete business-critical tasks. Depending on the use case, Mobile Mark 2014 projects the embedded Li polymer battery can reach five hours over a lifetime of 1,000 charge/discharge cycles.

PrevailPro’s thin and light form factor measures 14.96×9.8×0.73 inches (379mm x 248mm x 18mm) and weighs 4.8 lbs.

 


Assimilate and Z Cam offer second integrated VR workflow bundle

Z Cam and Assimilate are offering their second VR integrated workflow bundle, which features the Z Cam S1 Pro VR camera and the Assimilate Scratch VR Z post tools. The new Z Cam S1 Pro offers a higher level of image quality that includes better handling of low lights and dynamic range with detailed, well-saturated, noise-free video. In addition to the new camera, this streamlined pro workflow combines Z Cam’s WonderStitch optical-flow stitch feature and the end-to-end Scratch VR Z tools.

Z Cam and Assimilate have designed their combined technologies to ensure as simple a workflow as possible, including making it easy to switch back and forth between the S1 Pro functions and the Scratch VR Z tools. Users can also employ Scratch VR Z to do live camera preview, prior to shooting with the S1 Pro. Once the shoot begins with the S1 Pro, Scratch VR Z is then used for dailies and data management, including metadata. You don’t have to remove the SD cards and copy; it’s a direct connect to the PC and then to the camera via a high-speed Ethernet port. Stitching of the imagery is then done in Z Cam’s WonderStitch — now integrated into Scratch VR Z — as well as traditional editing, color grading, compositing, support for multichannel audio from the S1 or external ambisonic sound, finishing and publishing (to all final online or standalone 360 platforms).

Z Cam S1 Pro/Scratch VR Z  bundle highlights include:
• Lower light sensitivity and dynamic range – 4/3-inch CMOS image sensor
• Premium 220 degree MFT fisheye lens, f/2.8~11
• Coordinated AE (automatic exposure) and AWB ( automatic white-balance)
• Full integration with built-in Z Cam Sync
• 6K 30fps resolution (post stitching) output
• Gig-E port (video stream & setting control)
• WonderStich optical-flow based stitching
• Live Streaming to Facebook, YouTube or a private server, including text overlays and green/composite layers for a virtual set
• Scratch VR Z single, a streamlined, end-to-end, integrated VR post workflow

“We’ve already developed a few VR projects with the S1 Pro VR camera and the entire Neotopy team is awed by its image quality and performance,” says Alex Regeffe, VR post production manager at Neotopy Studio in Paris. “Together with the Scratch VR Z tools, we see this integrated workflow as a game changer in creating VR experiences, because our focus is now all on the creativity and storytelling rather than configuring multiple, costly tools and workflows.”

The Z Cam S1 Pro/Scratch VR Z bundle is available within 30 days of ordering. Priced at $11,999 (US), the bundle includes the following:
– Z CamS1 Pro Camera main unit, Z Cam S1 Pro battery unit (w/o battery cells), AC/DC power adapter unit and power connection cables (US, UK, EU).
– A Z Cam WonderStitch license, which is an optical flow-based stitching feature that performs offline stitching of files from Z Cam S1 Pro. Z Cam WonderStitch requires a valid software license associated with a designated Z Cam S1 Pro, and is nontransferable.
– A Scratch VR Z permanent license: a pro VR end-to-end, post workflow with an all-inclusive, realtime toolset for data management, dailies, conform, color grading, compositing, multichannel and ambisonic sound, and finishing, all integrated within the Z Cam S1 Pro camera. Includes one-year of support/updates.

The companies are offering a tutorial about the bundle.


Nugen adds 3D Immersive Extension to Halo Upmix

Nugen Audio has updated its Halo Upmix with a new 3D Immersive Extension, adding further options beyond the existing Dolby Atmos bed track capability. The 3D Immersive Extension now provides ambisonic-compatible output as an alternative to channel-based output for VR, game and other immersive applications. This makes it possible to upmix, re-purpose or convert channel-based audio for an ambisonic workflow.

With this 3D Immersive Extension, Halo fully supports Avid’s newly announced Pro Tools V.2.8, now with native 7.1.2 stems for Dolby Atmos mixing. The combination of Pro Tools 12.8 and Halo 3D Immersive Extension can provide a more fluid workflow for audio post pros handling multi-channel and object-based audio formats.

Halo Upmix is available immediately at a list price of $499 for both OS X and Windows, with support for Avid AAX, AudioSuite, VST2, VST3 and AU formats. The new 3D Immersive Extension replaces the Halo 9.1 Extension and can now be purchased for $199. Owners of the existing Halo 9.1 Extension can upgrade to the Halo 3D Immersive Extension for no additional cost. Support for native 7.1.2 stems in Avid Pro Tools 12.8 is available on launch.


Mocha VR: An After Effects user’s review

By Zach Shukan

If you’re using Adobe After Effects to do compositing and you’re not using Mocha, then you’re holding yourself back. If you’re using Mettle Skybox, you need to check out Mocha VR, the VR-enhanced edition of Mocha Pro.

Mocha Pro, and Mocha VR are all standalone programs where you work entirely within the Mocha environment and then export your tracks, shapes or renders to another program to do the rest of the compositing work. There are plugins for Maxon Cinema 4D, The Foundry’s Nuke, HitFilm, and After Effects that allow you to do more with the Mocha data within your chosen 3D or compositing program. Limited-feature versions of Mocha (Mocha AE and Mocha HitFilm) come installed with the Creative Cloud versions of After Effects and HitFilm 4 Pro, and every update of these plugins is getting closer to looking like a full version of Mocha running inside of the effects panel.

Maybe I’m old school, or maybe I just try to get the maximum performance from my workstation, but I always choose to run Mocha VR by itself and only open After Effects when I’m ready to export. In my experience, all the features of Mocha run more smoothly in the standalone than when they’re launched and run inside of After Effects.**

How does Mocha VR compare to Mocha Pro? If you’re not doing VR, stick with Mocha Pro. However, if you are working with VR footage, you won’t have to bend over backwards to keep using Mocha.

Last year was the year of VR, when all my clients wanted to do something with VR. It was a crazy push to be the first to make something and I rode the wave all year. The thing is there really weren’t many tools specifically designed to work with 360 video. Now this year, the post tools for working with VR are catching up.

In the past, I forced previous versions of Mocha to work with 360 footage before the VR version, but since Mocha added its VR-specific features, stabilizing a 360-camera became cake compared to the kludgy way it works with the industry standard After Effects 360 plugin, Skybox. Also, I’ve used Mocha to track objects in 360 before the addition of an equirectangular* camera and it was super-complicated because I had to splice together a whole bunch of tracks to compensate for the 360 camera distortion. Now it’s possible to create a single track to follow objects as they travel around the camera. Read the footnote for an explanation of equirectangular, a fancy word that you need to know if you’re working in VR.

Now let’s talk about the rest of Mocha’s features…

Rotoscoping
I used to rotoscope by tracing every few frames and then refining the frames in between until I found out about the Mocha way to rotoscope. Because Mocha combines rotoscoping with tracking of arbitrary shapes, all you have to do is draw a shape and then use tracking to follow and deform all the way through. It’s way smarter and more importantly, faster. Also, with the Uberkey feature, you can adjust your shapes on multiple frames at once. If you’re still rotoscoping with After Effects alone, you’re doing it the hard way.

Planar Tracking
When I first learned about Mocha it was all about the planar tracker, and that really is still the heart of the program. Mocha’s basically my go-to when nothing else works. Recently, I was working on a shot where a woman had her dress tucked into her pantyhose, and I pretty much had to recreate a leg of a dress that swayed and flowed along with her as she walked. If it wasn’t for Mocha’s planar tracker I wouldn’t have been able to make a locked-on track of the soft-focus (solid color and nearly without detail) side of the dress. After Effects couldn’t make a track because there weren’t enough contrast-y details.

GPU Acceleration
I never thought Mocha’s planar tracking was slow, even though it is slower than point tracking, but then they added GPU acceleration a version or two ago and now it flies through shots. It has to be at least five times as fast now that it’s using my Nvidia Titan X (Pascal), and it’s not like my CPU was a slouch (an 8-core i7-5960X).

Object Removal
I’d be content using Mocha just to track difficult shots and for rotoscoping, but their object-removal feature has saved me hours of cloning/tracking work in After Effects, especially when I’ve used it to remove camera rigs or puppet rigs from shots.

Mocha’s remove module is the closest thing out there to automated object removal***. It’s as simple as 1) create a mask around the object you want to remove, 2) track the background that your object passes in front of, and then 3) render. Okay, there’s a little more to it, but compared to the cloning and tracking and cloning and tracking and cloning and tracking method, it’s pretty great. Also, a huge reason to get the VR edition of Mocha is that the remove module will work with a 360 camera.

Here I used Mocha object removal to remove ropes that pulled a go-cart in a spot for Advil.

VR Outside of After Effects?
I’ve spent most of this article talking about Mocha with After Effects, because it’s what I know best, but there is one VR pipeline that can match nearly all of Mocha VR’s capabilities: the Nuke plugin Cara VR, but there is a cost to that workflow. More on this shortly.

Where you will hit the limit of Mocha VR (and After Effects in general) is if you are doing 3D compositing with CGI and real-world camera depth positioning. Mocha’s 3D Camera Solve module is not optimized for 360 and the After Effects 3D workspace can be limited for true 3D compositing, compared to software like Nuke or Fusion.

While After Effects sort of tacked on its 3D features to its established 2D workflow, Nuke is a true 3D environment as robust as Autodesk Maya or any of the high-end 3D software. This probably sounds great, but you should also know that Cara VR is $4,300 vs. $1,000 for Mocha VR (the standalone + Adobe plugin version) and Nuke starts at $4,300/year vs. $240/year for After Effects.

Conclusion
I think of Mocha as an essential companion to compositing in After Effects, because it makes routine work much faster and it does some things you just can’t do with After Effects alone. Mocha VR is a major release because VR has so much buzz these days, but in reality it’s pretty much just a version of Mocha Pro with the ability to also work with 360 footage.

*Equirectangular is a clever way of unwrapping a 360 spherical projection, a.k.a, the view we see in VR, by flattening it out into a rectangle. It’s a great way to see the whole 360 view in an editing program, but A: it’s very distorted so it can cause problems for tracking and B: anything that is moving up or down in the equirectangular frame will wrap around to the opposite side (a bit like Pacman when he exits the screen), and non-VR tracking programs will stop tracking when something exits the screen on one side.

**Note: According to the developer, one of the main advantages to running Mocha as a plug-in (inside AE, Premiere, Nuke, etc) for 360 video work is that you are using the host program’s render engine and proxy workflow. Having the ability to do all your tracking, masking and object removal on proxy resolutions is a huge benefit when working at large 360 formats that can be as large as 8k stereoscopic. Additionally, the Mocha modules that render, such as reorient for horizon stabilization or remove module will render inside the plug-in making for a streamlined workflow.

***FayOut was a “coming soon” product that promised an even more automated method for object removal, but as of the publishing of this article it appears that they are no longer “coming soon” and may have folded or maybe their technology was purchased and it will be included in a future product. We shall see…
________________________________________
Zach Shukan is the VFX specialist at SilVR and is constantly trying his hand at the latest technologies in the video post production world.


Red’s Hydrogen One: new 3D-enabled smartphone

In their always subtle way, Red has stated that “the future of personal communication, information gathering, holographic multi-view, 2D, 3D, AR/VR/MR and image capture just changed forever” with the introduction of Hydrogen One, a pocket-sized, glasses-free “holographic media machine.”

Hydrogen One is a standalone, full-featured, unlocked multi-band smartphone, operating on Android OS, that promises “look around depth in the palm of your hand” without the need for separate glasses or headsets. The device features a 5.7-inch professional hydrogen holographic display that switches between traditional 2D content, holographic multi-view content, 3D content and interactive games, and it supports both landscape and portrait modes. Red has also embedded a proprietary H30 algorithm in the OS system that will convert stereo sound into multi-dimensional audio.

The Hydrogen system incorporates a high-speed data bus to enable a comprehensive and expandable modular component system, including future attachments for shooting high-quality motion, still and holographic images. It will also integrate into the professional Red camera program, working together with Scarlet, Epic and Weapon as a user interface and monitor.

Future-users are already talking about this “nifty smartphone with glasses-free 3D,” and one has gone so far as to describe the announcement as “the day 360-video became Betamax, and AR won the race.” Others are more tempered in their enthusiasm, viewing this as a really expensive smartphone with a holographic screen that may or might not kill 360 video. Time will tell.

Initially priced between $1,195 and $1,595, the Hydrogen One is targeted to ship in Q1 of 2018.


Adobe acquires Mettle’s SkyBox tools for 360/VR editing, VFX

Adobe has acquired all SkyBox technology from Mettle, a developer of 360-degree and virtual reality software. As more media and entertainment companies embrace 360/VR, there is a need for seamless, end-to-end workflows for this new and immersive medium.

The Skybox toolset is designed exclusively for post production in Adobe Premiere Pro CC and Adobe After Effects CC and complements Adobe Creative Cloud’s existing 360/VR cinematic production technology. Adobe will integrate SkyBox plugin functionality natively into future releases of Premiere Pro and After Effects.

To further strengthen Adobe’s leadership in 360-degree and virtual reality, Mettle co-founder Chris Bobotis will join Adobe, bringing more than 25 years of production experience to his new role.

“We believe making virtual reality content should be as easy as possible for creators. The acquisition of Mettle SkyBox technology allows us to deliver a more highly integrated VR editing and effects experience to the film and video community,” says Steven Warner, VP of digital video and audio at Adobe. “Editing in 360/VR requires specialized technology, and as such, this is a critical area of investment for Adobe, and we’re thrilled Chris Bobotis has joined us to help lead the charge forward.”

“Our relationship started with Adobe in 2010 when we created FreeForm for After Effects, and has been evolving ever since. This is the next big step in our partnership,” says Bobotis, now director, professional video at Adobe. “I’ve always believed in developing software for artists, by artists, and I’m looking forward to bringing new technology and integration that will empower creators with the digital tools they need to bring their creative vision to life.”

Introduced in April 2015, SkyBox was the first plugin to leverage Mettle’s proprietary 3DNAE technology, and its success quickly led to additional development of 360/VR plugins for Premiere Pro and After Effects.

Today, Mettle’s plugins have been adopted by companies such as The New York Times, CNN, HBO, Google, YouTube, Discovery VR, DreamWorks TV, National Geographic, Washington Post, Apple and Facebook, as well as independent filmmakers and YouTubers.

SGO’s Mistika VR is now available

 

SGO’s Mistika VR software app is now available. This solution has been developed using the company’s established Mistika technology and offers advanced realtime stitching capabilities combined with a new intuitive interface and raw format support with incredible speed.

Using Mistika Optical Flow Technology (our main image), the new VR solution takes camera position information and sequences then stitches the images together using extensive and intelligent pre-sets. Its unique stitching algorithms help with the many challenges facing post teams to allow for the highest image quality.

Mistika VR was developed to encompass and work with as many existing VR camera formats as possible, and SGO is creating custom pre-sets for productions where teams are building the rigs themselves.

The Mistika VR solution is part of SGO’s new natively integrated workflow concept. SGO has been dissecting its current turnkey offering “Mistika Ultima” to develop advanced workflow applications aimed at specific tasks.

Mistika VR runs on Mac, and Windows and is available as a personal or professional (with SGO customer support) edition license. Costs for licenses are:

–  30-day license (with no automatic renewals): Evaluation Version is free; Personal Edition: $78; Professional Edition $110

– Monthly subscription: Personal Edition $55; Professional Edition $78 per month

–  Annual subscription: Personal Edition: $556 per year; Professional Edition: $779 per year