Blending Ursa Mini and Red footage for Aston Martin spec spot

By Daniel Restuccio

When producer/director Jacob Steagall set out to make a spec commercial for Aston Martin, he chose to lens it on the Blackmagic Ursa Mini 4.6k and the Scarlet Red. He says the camera combo worked so seamlessly he dares anyone to tell which shots are Blackmagic and which are Red.

L-R Blackmagic’s Moritz Fortmann and Shawn Carlson with Jacob Steagall and Scott Stevens.

“I had the idea of filming a spec commercial to generate new business,” says Steagall. He convinced the high-end car maker to lend him an Aston Martin 2016 V12 Vanquish for a weekend. “The intent was to make a nice product that could be on their website and also be a good-looking piece on the demo reel for my production company.”

Steagall immediately pulled together his production team, which consisted of co-director Jonathan Swecker and cinematographers Scott Stevens and Adam Pacheco. “The team and I collaborated together about the vision for the spot which was to be quick, clean and to the point, but we would also accentuate the luxury and sexiness of the car.”

“We had access to the new Blackmagic Ursa Mini 4.6k and an older Red Scarlet with the MX chip,” says Stevens. “I was really interested in seeing how both cameras performed.”

He set up the Ursa Mini to shoot ProRes HQ at Ultra HD (3840×2160) and the Scarlet at 8:1 compression at 4K (4096×2160). He used both Canon still camera primes and a 24-105mm zoom, switching them from camera to camera depending on the shot. “For some wide shots we set them up side by side,” explains Stevens. “We also would have one camera shooting the back of the car and the other camera shooting a close-up on the side.”

In addition to his shooting duties, Stevens also edited the spot, using Adobe Premiere, and exported the XML into Blackmagic Resolve Studio 12. Stevens notes that, in addition to loving cinematography, he’s also “really into” color correction. “Jacob (Steagall) and I liked the way the Red footage looked straight out of the camera in the RedGamma4 color space. I matched the Blackmagic footage to the Red footage to get a basic look.”

Blackmagic colorist Moritz Fortmann took Stevens’ basis color correction and finessed the grade even more. “The first step was to talk to Jacob and Scott and find out what they were envisioning, what feel and look they were going for. They had already established a look so we saved a few stills as reference images to work off. The spot was shot on two different types of cameras, and in different formats. Step two was to analyze the characteristics of each camera and establish a color correction to match the two.  Step three was to tweak and refine the look. We did what I would describe as a simple color grade, only relying on primaries, without using any Power Windows or keys.”

If you’re planning to shoot mixed footage, Fortmann suggests you use cameras with similar characteristics, matching resolution, dynamic range and format. “Shooting RAW and/or Log provides for the highest dynamic range,” he says. “The more ‘room’ a colorist has to make adjustments, the easier it will be to match mixed footage. When color correcting, the key is to make mixed footage look consistent. One camera may perform well in low light while another one does not. You’ll need to find that sweet spot that works for all of your footage, not just one camera.”

Daniel Restuccio is a writer and chair of the multimedia department at California Lutheran University.


One thought on “Blending Ursa Mini and Red footage for Aston Martin spec spot

  1. Jesse Hoffmann

    It’s nice to see a videographer that actually knows what they are doing. Great video, keep at it!

    Reply

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