Behind the Title: Composer Michael Carey

NAME: Michael Carey (@MichaelCarey007)

COMPANY: Resonation Music

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Creative director/composer (film/commercials/TV) and songwriter/producer/mixer (album work).

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
For commercials, film and TV projects, I work closely with the director, producer and agency to come up with something that meets their needs and the needs of the project. I develop an understanding of their overall vision, and then I conceptualize, compose and produce original music to capture the essence of this vision, in a complimentary way.

i-want-to-say-composer-main-title-opening-scenes

Michael Carey was composer of the main title theme and the opening scenes for ‘I Want to Say.’

This includes themes, underscore, source, main titles, end titles, etc. When it comes to album projects and soundtrack songs, I often write for (or with) the featured artist or band and produce the track from end to end. This means that I am also the engineer, programmer, session player and often mixer for a project.

On large projects that require fast turnaround, I wear the “creative director” hat, and I assemble and manage a specific team of colleagues to collaborate with me — those I know can get the job done at the highest level. I keep things focused and cohesive, and strive to maintain a consistent musical voice.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
Whichever medium I’m working in, be it music-for-picture or album work, the underlying fundamentals are surprisingly similar. In both instances, it’s ultimately about storytelling – conveying maximum emotional impact in a compelling way. Using dynamics, melody, tension, release, density and space to create memorable moments and exciting transitions to keep the viewer or listener engaged.

I’m always striving to support the “main event.” In film, it’s visuals and dialog. In album work it’s the singer’s performance. I see my job as building a metaphorical “frame” around the picture. Enhance, reinforce, compliment, but never distract.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
Two parts, really. First, the satisfaction of achieving a collective goal. Helping a filmmaker/artist realize their vision, while finding a way to authentically express my own musical vision and make a deeper connection with the audience experiencing the work.

There are moments in the course of a project when you hit on something that’s undeniable. Everyone involved immediately feels it. Human connections are made. Those are great moments, and ultimately you want the whole piece to feel like that.

The second part is the inspiration that comes from working collaboratively (usually with people at the top of their game) with those talented peers who challenge and push you in directions you might not have taken otherwise.

WHAT IS YOUR PROCESS FOR SCORING? HOW DO YOU BEGIN?
1) Watch film/read script. 2) Discuss with director, get a sense of their vision. 3) Create musical sketches and build a sonic palette. If there’s already some picture available to work with, then I’ll tackle a scene that feels representative of the rest of the project and refine it with input from the director. My goal is to create a musical/sonic “voice” or “sound” for the film that becomes an inextricable part of its personality.

CAN YOU WALK US THROUGH YOUR WORKFLOW?
Once overall direction has been established and scenes have been spotted, my first step with a scene is to map things out tempo/timing-wise, making note of any significant cuts, events or moments that need to be hit (or avoided) musically.

By defining this structure first, it frees me up to explore musically and texturally with a clear understanding of where “ins” and “outs” are. By then, I usually have a pretty clear sense of what I want to hear as it pertains to realizing the vision of the director, and from that point it is about execution —programming, recording live instrumentation, processing/manipulation and mixing — whatever is required to make the scene “feel” the way it does in my head.

DOES YOUR PROCESS CHANGE DEPENDING ON THE TYPE OF PROJECT? FILM VS. SPOT, ETC?
There are certain nuances that have to be considered when approaching these different types of projects. Nailing the details in short form (commercials) is often more crucial because you have an entire world of information to convey in 30 seconds or less. There can be no missed moment or opportunity. It needs to feel cohesive with a cinematic story arc, and a compelling payoff at the end, all in an incredibly compressed window of time.

This is less evident in long-form projects. With feature films or TV, you often have the luxury to build musical movements more naturally as a scene progresses.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
That’s a tough one. As a kid I wanted to be an anthropologist. At 21, I went to a cooking school in Paris for a month thinking that that might be cool. More recently, I’ve been dabbling with building websites for friends using template-based platforms like Squarespace.

I think the common themes with these other interests are curiosity, experimentation, creativity and storytelling. Bringing an idea to life, making the abstract tangible. At the end of the day, music still allows me to do these things with a greater degree of satisfaction.

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
I knew music would be my path by age 14. I was playing guitar in local bands at the time, and then moved into steady club gigs. By the time I was 18, I was in a signed band, recording and touring. I couldn’t have imagined doing anything else. When I hit my 20s, I knew that writing and composing was the path ahead (vs. being a “gun for hire” guitarist).

I still played in bands and did lots of session work, but I focused more on songwriting and learning about recording and production. During that time, I had the opportunity to work with some legendary British engineer producers. At one point, a well-known video director who had shot some videos with one of my bands had started doing commercials, and he was unhappy with the music that an ad agency had put in one of his spots. So he recruited me to take a shot a composing a new score. It all clicked, and that opened the door to a couple of decades of high-profile commercial spots, as well as consistent work from major ad agencies and brands.

Eventually, this journey led me down the road of TV and film. All the while, I kept a foot in the album world, writing for and producing artists in the US and internationally.

andy-vargas-the-beat-2016-hmma-winner-producer-songwriterCAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
I Want To Say— Composer: Main Title and opening scenes (Healdsburg International Film Festival – Best Documentary).
LBS– Songwriter/Producer: End Title Track feat. J.R. Richards of Dishwalla (Sundance Official Selection, Independent Spirit Awards nominee)
• Andy Vargas/The Beat (Producer/Songwriter – Winner 2016 Hollywood Music in Media Awards “R&B/Soul”)
• Escape The Fate/Alive (Songwriter — hit single, #26 Active Rock, album #2 Billboard Hard Rock charts)

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
It’s hard to pick one. Some of the projects listed above are contenders. There’s a young band I’m developing and producing right now called Bentley. I will be very proud when that is released. They’re fantastic.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
Pro Tools. It’s my “instrument” as much as any guitar or keyboard. It’s allowed me to be incredibly productive and make anything I hear in my head a reality. Steven Slate, Sound Toys and PSP plug-ins. Vibe, warmth, color, saturation, detail. My extensive collection of vintage gear (amps, mics, mic pres, compressors, guitars, boutique pedals, etc.). Not sure if these qualify as “technology,” but they all have buttons and knobs and make great noises!

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
Instagram, Twitter and Facebook (to a lesser extent lately).

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
I have an amazing family who helps keep me centered with my eyes on the big picture. Running and exercise (not enough, but feels great when I do) and, increasingly, I try to meditate each morning. A friend and colleague whose studio demeanor I’ve always admired turned me onto it. He’s consistently calm and focused even in the midst of total drama and chaos. I’d like to think I’m getting there.

Main Image: Patricia Maureen Photography-P.M.P


One thought on “Behind the Title: Composer Michael Carey

  1. Mark Browne

    Having had the honor of working with Michael, I must say he is one of the best writer/producer/musicians I’ve known in my lifetime. I hope our paths will cross again soon.

    Reply

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