Author Archives: Randi Altman

Assimilate Scratch and Scratch VR Suite upgraded to V.8.6

Assimilate is now offering an open beta for Scratch 8.6 and the Scratch VR Suite 8.6, the latest versions of its realtime post tools and workflow — VR/360 and 2D/3D content, from dailies to conform grading, compositing and finishing. Expanded HDR functions are featured throughout the product line, including in Scratch VR, which now offers stitching capabilities.

Both open beta versions gives pros the opportunity to actively use the full suite of Scratch and Scratch VR tools, while evaluating and submitting requests and recommendations for additional features or updates.

Scratch Web for cloud-based, realtime review and collaboration, and Scratch Play for immediate review and playback, are also included in the ecosystem updates. Both products support VR/360 and 2D/3D content.

Current users of the Scratch VR Suite 8.5 and Scratch Finishing 8.5 can download the Scratch 8.6 open beta. Scratch 8.6 open beta and the Scratch VR Suite open beta are available now.

“V8.6 is a major update for both Scratch and the Scratch VR Suite with significant enhancements to the HDR and ACES workflows. We’ve added stitching to the VR toolset so that creators have a complete and streamlined end-to-end VR workflow,” says Jeff Edson, CEO at Assimilate. “The open Beta helps us to continue developing the best and most useful post production features and techniques all artists need to perfect their creativity in color grading and finishing. We act on all input, much of it immediately and some in regular updates.”

Here are some details of the update:

HDR
• PQ and HLG transfer functions are now an integral part of Scratch color management.
• Scopes automatically switch to HDR mode if needed and show levels in a nit-scale; highlights any reference level that you set.
• At the project level, define the HDR mastering metadata: color space, color primaries and white levels, luminance levels and more. The metadata is automatically included in the Video HDMI interface (AJA, BMD, Bluefish444) for display.
• Static metadata has the function to calculate dynamic luminance metadata like MaxCLL and MaxFall.
• HDR footage can be published directly to YouTube with HDR metadata.

VR/360 – Scratch VR Suite
• 360 stitching functionality: load all your source media from your 360 cameras into Scratch VR and combine it to a single equirectangular image. Support for camera stitch templates: AutoPano projects, Hugin and PTStitch scripts.
• Ambisonic Audio: Scratch VR can load, set and playback ambisonic audio files to complete the 360 immersive experience.
• Video with 360 sound can be published directly to YouTube 360.
• Additional overlay handles to the existing 2D-equirectangular feature for more easily positioning 2D elements in a 360 scene.

DIT Reporting Function
• Create a report of all clips of either a timeline, a project or just a selection of shots.
• Reports include metadata, such as a thumbnail, clip-name, timecode, scene, take, comments and any metadata attached to a clip.
• Choose from predefined templates or create your own.

Ingenuity Studios helps VFX-heavy spot get NASCAR-ready

Hollywood-based VFX house Ingenuity Studios recently worked on a 60-second Super Bowl spot for agency Pereira & O’Dell promoting Fox Sports’ coverage of the Daytona 500, which takes place on February 26. The ad, directed by Joseph Kahn, features people from all over the country gearing up to watch the Daytona 500, including footage from NASCAR races, drivers and, for some reason, actor James Van Der Beek.

The Ingenuity team had only two weeks to turn around this VFX-heavy spot, called Daytona Day. Some CG elements include a giant robot, race cars and crowds. While they were working on the effects, Fox was shooting footage in Charlotte, North Carolina and Los Angeles.

“When we were initially approached about this project we knew the turnaround would be a challenge,” explains creative director/VFX supervisor Grant Miller. “Editorial wasn’t fully locked until Thursday before the big game! With such a tight deadline preparing as much as we could in advance was key.”

Portions of the shoot took place at the Daytona Speedway, and since it was an off day the stadium and infield were empty. “In preparation, our CG team built the entire Daytona stadium while we were still shooting, complete with cheering CG crowds, RVs filling the interior, pit crews, etc.,” says Miller. “This meant that once shots were locked we simply needed to track the camera, adjust the lighting and render all the stadium passes for each shot.”

Additional shooting took place at the Charlotte Motor Speedway, Downtown Los Angeles and Pasadena, California.

In addition to prepping CG for set extensions, Ingenuity also got a head start on the giant robot that shows up halfway through the commercial.  “Once the storyboards were approved and we were clear on the level of detail required, we took our ‘concept bot’ out of ZBrush, retopologized and unwrapped it, then proceeded to do surfacing and materials in Substance Painter. While we had some additional detailing to do, we were able to get the textures 80 percent completed by applying a variety of procedural materials to the mesh, saving a ton of manual painting.”

Other effects work included over 40 CG NASCAR vehicles to fill the track, additional cars for the traffic jam and lots of greenscreen and roto work to get the scenes shot in Charlotte into Daytona. There was also a fair bit of invisible work that included cleaning up sets, removing rain, painting out logos, etc.

Other tools used include Autodesk’s Maya, The Foundry’s Nuke and BorisFX’s Mocha.

Project Arachnid short targets online images of child sexual abuse

Early this year, the Canadian Centre for Child Protection (CCCP) launched Project Arachnid, a new tool that detects and helps remove images of child sexual abuse on the Internet. The centre, which operates in partnership with police forces across Canada, recently posed questions to 128 adults who had been sexually exploited as children and whose abuse had been recorded on camera. Almost three-quarters of respondents said they were worried about being recognized years later, because the images continue to spread online.

To bring to life how Project Arachnid helps victims break the endless cycle of abuse, the organization enlisted agency No Fixed Address and Nice Shoes Creative Studio to craft a brief, but powerful animated short film that features a B&W hand-drawn look.

“It was very important to us to find a way to reflect the gravity of the matter, but not make people look away. We didn’t want the problem to seem insurmountable,” says Shawn James, creative director at No Fixed Address.

Nice Shoes creative directors Gary Thomas and Matt Greenwood, along with design director Stefan Woronko, developed style frames, taking the piece into an illustrative, textured direction inspired by Manga, graphic novels and the work of Frank Miller and Edward Gorey.

As the teams explored the concept, they quickly found they were on the same page, and worked closely to animate the dramatic and powerful story. “We felt the narrative should drive the visuals and presented a solution where only simple animation was needed to emphasize the story,” says Thomas, adding that they were brought in almost from the beginning. “We had reference from the creative team, but we really came back with the look and feel, and worked closely with the team to refine elements.”

Nice Shoes used Adobe Photoshop for all the illustrations in order to get a handmade quality. Everything was assembled in Adobe After Effects. “We composited the scenes and gave it a paper-like, distressed texture,” says Thomas. “We used Maxon Cinema 4D to do the spiders and globe sequences. We had a great character animator, Rob Findlay, come in for a few days and add the animated touches to the characters.”

In terms of challenges, Thomas says the only major one was a quick turnaround of three weeks. “The piece was tied to a big media launch for the CCCP, so we had a firm deadline to work with. It wasn’t really onerous, because we were careful at the outset to do as much as we could at the beginning to make sure the creatives at No Fixed Address were part of the process, and they in turn were able to keep their clients at CCCP in the loop.”

Hush adds Eloise Murphy as senior producer

Design agency Hush has expanded its creative production team with the addition of senior producer Eloise Murphy. In her new position at Hush, Murphy will oversee all project phases and develop relationships with new and existing vendors.

During her career, Murphy has worked in the UK and North America for companies such as the BBC, TED and Moment Factory. Her resume is diverse, working on projects that range from content production for Madonna’s Rebel Heart Tour to experiential production for TED Talks in Rio de Janeiro. Her experience spans digital design, content production and experiential activations for brands including Samsung, Intel and BBC Radio 1.

“Having worked with a variety of brands, artists and companies, I have a solid understanding of how to manage projects optimally within different settings, parameters and environments,” says Murphy. “It has enabled me to be highly adaptable, flexible and develop a strong knack for pre-empting, identifying and resolving issues promptly and successfully. I believe my international experience has made me well-versed in managing complex projects and I’m looking forward to bringing new ideas to the table at Hush.”

The A-List: Oscar-nominated director of The Salesman Asghar Farhadi

By Iain Blair

Iranian writer and director Asghar Farhadi burst onto the international film scene with his 2011 film A Separation, which won both the Golden Globe and Oscar for Best Foreign Language Film. The film also earned Farhadi an Academy Award nomination for Best Original Screenplay and won the Golden Bear at the 2011 Berlin International Film Festival.

After being named one of Time magazine’s 100 Most Influential People following the release of A Separation, Farhadi moved to Paris to film The Past, which premiered at the 2013 Cannes Film Festival. It was nominated for the Golden Globe award for Best Foreign Language Film.

After the success of these films, two of Farhadi’s earlier works, About Elly (Winner: Best Director, 2009 Berlin International Film Festival) and Fireworks Wednesday (2006), found US distribution and critical acclaim.

Farhadi’s latest film, The Salesman, is another low-key, intimate and suspenseful drama that starts off innocently enough, but which slowly peels away layer upon layer of a relationship to reveal the shifting internal struggle beneath. After their old flat becomes damaged, Emad (Shahab Hosseini) and Rana (Taraneh Alidoosti), a young couple living in Tehran, are forced to move into a new apartment. However, once relocated, a sudden eruption of violence linked to the previous tenant of their new home dramatically changes the couple’s life, creating a simmering tension between husband and wife.

A master of slow-burning, visceral dramas that expose domestic discord through his multi-layered screenplays, Farhadi uses the story to study the psychology of vengeance and a relationship put under strain while continuing to explore the condition of women in Iran and the male psyche. The film was a Golden Globe nominee for Best Motion Picture Foreign Language and is up for an Oscar this year for Best Foreign Language Film.

I recently talked to Farhadi about making the film, and his workflow.

What were you aiming for with this film?
I was going for a lot of different things. One was the idea of taking Arthur Miller’s play and then trying to erase the boundaries between theater and life so that the audience begins to wonder, “Is this part of life or is it part of a play?” The other thing that mattered to me was the relationship between the audience and these characters. To what extent could the audience put themselves in the characters’ shoes? In my previous films, audiences could relate, but this was different and a new experience for me.

There are certain actions taken by the characters that people may not approve of, but hopefully can understand. It’s a paradoxical situation for the viewer —while they may disapprove strongly, when you ask them what they would do in the same situation, their reactions can be far more extreme than those taken by Emad after his wife is attacked. I very much wished to place a viewer in this position, where they were tested.

Why did you choose Death of a Salesman as a backdrop to your drama?
When I reread the play, I came across so many similarities between it and the couple in my film. My couple is like the Iranian version of Willy Loman and his wife Linda, and I’d always had the idea of doing a film that takes place in the world of theater. I grew up doing a lot of theater, and I always loved the play. When I began writing my script, I developed this idea of characters putting on a play. The idea that it was a mirror of the actual lives of the characters. They’re actually playing Willy Loman and Linda, and the film and play are very close to each other thematically. For me, in the play the most important aspect is the humiliation, which is also the main theme of my film. It’s humiliation that causes Willy Loman to destroy himself, and Emad feels completely humiliated by what happens to his wife. There’s also the theme of boundaries, of personal space and safety in that space.

Your last film, The Past, was shot in France. How important was it to shoot this in Tehran?
Very important. In fact, I was all set to go to Spain to make a film, and it was all planned and ready to go, with Penélope Cruz and Javier Bardem starring, and Pedro Almodóvar as a producer. But it was going to take a while to get everyone together, and I suddenly felt I just wanted to stay in Tehran. It was a purely emotional decision, and I didn’t know how to tell everyone in Spain, but I told my producer, “My heart tells me I should stay in Iran and do this film instead.” I prefer to make most of my films in Iran.

Do you like the post process?
I love it, but I also find it a very difficult experience. I always feel very restless in post, as I go to every minute of every bit of post production and watch everything. It’s all about deciding what to cut and get rid of — and that kills me. You spend so much time and effort collecting all the raw material and then you get into post and it really becomes about dispensing with a lot of stuff you love, and these decisions are so final. I find it very hard.

Where did you do the post?
Since About Elly, I’ve always done all the post at Moon Studios in Tehran. I do all the editing there as well as all the sound design and audio work. It’s a very relaxed place to work. We did the DI at Studio Kamrani in Tehran with colorist Hootan Haghshenas. Again, I’m there for every minute of it.

Tell us about working with editor Hayedeh Safiyari, who also cut A Separation and About Elly for you.
Before we start shooting each time, I give her the script and we talk a great deal about it. We don’t discuss the edit — just the characters and the story. She visits the set sometimes, but not as an editor, it’s more about just looking around and getting the atmosphere. Then after the shoot, we sit in the edit room together, but I don’t say anything. She does her work. We don’t cut the film and then start changing stuff and fine tuning it. We cut each scene like a fine cut and get them right by adjusting length and pacing and so on, and at this stage we talk a lot. It’s a very successful working relationship, and we cut this in about four months.

Writer Iain Blair and Asghar Farhadi.

Can you talk about the importance of sound in the film?
It’s really important to me, not just in post, but during the shoot. For example, when we first see a character, the viewer doesn’t get any additional information visually. But you can feed an audience more and more information using sound. That’s why, when we rehearse a scene, I don’t even look at the monitor. I just listen. That tells me so much more. In post, I always strive to make the sound as realistic as we can. We try not to introduce too much sound, and it’s rare for me to use much music in my films since that stirs up so much emotion. Usually, it’s just used over the end credits.

How important are the Oscars and other awards to you?
They’re very important for smaller indie movies like mine, but any success is always a two-edged sword. It makes your film known to a far bigger audience, all over the world, but the danger is that it also puts you in a competitive situation, both with yourself and others, and that’s not healthy for a filmmaker. (Editor’s Note: Farhadi has gone on record that he will not be attending this year’s Oscar ceremony in Los Angeles in reaction to President Trump’s travel ban, as Iran is one of the seven countries that is affected.)


Industry insider Iain Blair has been interviewing the biggest directors in Hollywood and around the world for years. He is a regular contributor to Variety and has written for such outlets as Reuters, The Chicago Tribune, The Los Angeles Times and the Boston Globe.

Rick & Morty co-creator Justin Roiland to keynote VRLA

Justin Roiland, co-creator of Rick & Morty from Cartoon Network’s Adult Swim, will be delivering VRLA’s Saturday keynote. The expo, which takes place April 14 and 15 at the LA Convention Center, will include demos, educational sessions, experimental work and presentations.

The exhibit floor will feature hardware and software developers, content creators and prototype technology that can only be seen at VRLA. Registration is currently open, with the business-focused two-day “Pro” pass at $299 and a one-day pass for Saturday priced at $40.

Roiland, is also the newly-minted founder of the VR studio Squanchtendo, aims to dive into the surreally funny possibilities of the medium in his keynote, remarking, “What does the future of VR hold? Will there be more wizard games? Are grandmas real? What is a wizard really? Are there wizard grandmas? How does this factor into VR? Please come to my incredible keynote address on the state of VR.”

VRLA is currently accepting applications for its Indie Zone, which offers complimentary exhibition space to small teams who have raised less than $500,000 in venture capital funding or generated less than less than that amount in revenue. Click here to apply.

Alvaro Rodríguez

Behind the Title: Histeria Music’s chief audio engineer Alvaro Rodríguez

NAME: Alvaro Rodríguez

COMPANY: Histeria Music (@histeriamusic)

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
Miami’s Histeria Music is a music production and audio post company. Since its foundation in 2003 we have focused on supporting our clients’ communication needs with powerful music and sound that convey a strong message and create a bond with the audience. We offer full audio post production, music production, and sound design services for advertising, film, TV, radio, video games and the corporate world.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
CEO/ Chief Audio Engineer

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
As an audio post engineer, I work on 5.1 and stereo mixing, ADR and voiceover recordings, voiceover castings and talent direction, music search and editing, dialogue cleanup, remote recording via ISDN and/or Source Connect and sound design.

Studio A

Studio A

As the owner and founder of the studio, I take care of a ton of things. I make sure our final productions are of the highest quality possible, and handle client services, PR, bookkeeping, social media and marketing. Sometimes it’s a bit overwhelming but I wouldn’t trade it for anything else!

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
Some people might think that I just sit behind a console, pushing buttons trying to make things sound pretty. In reality, I do much more than that. I advise creative and copywriters on changes in scripts that might help better fit whatever project we are recording. I also direct talent using creative vocabulary to ensure that their delivery is adequate and their performance hits that emotion we are trying to achieve. I get to sound design, edit and move audio clips around on my DAW, almost as if I were composing a piece of music, adding my own sound to the creative process.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
Sound design! I love it when I get a video from any of our clients that has no sound whatsoever, not even a scratch recording of a voiceover. This gives me the opportunity to add my signature sound and be as creative as possible and help tell a story. I also love working on radio spots. Since there is no video to support the audio, I usually get to be a bigger part of the creative process once we start putting together the spots. Everything from the way the talent is recorded to the sounds and the way phrases and words are edited together is something I’ll never get tired of doing.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
Sales. It’s tricky because as the owner when you succeed, it’s the best feeling in the world, but it can be very frustrating and overwhelming sometimes.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE TIME OF THE DAY?
During work it has to be that moment you get the email saying the spots have been approved and are ready for traffic. On a personal level, it’s when I take my nine-year old to soccer practice, usually around 6pm

Studio B

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
Wow, I have no idea how to answer this question. I can’t see myself doing anything else, really, although I’ll add that I am an avid home brewer and enjoy the craft quite a bit.

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
Ever since I was a kid I had this fascination with things that make sounds. I was always drawn to a guitar or simply buckets I could smack and make some sort of a rhythmic pattern. After high school, I went to college and started studying business administration, only to follow in my dad and brother’s steps. Not to anyone’s surprise I quit after the second semester and ended up doing a bit of soul searching. Long story short, I ended up attending Full Sail University where I graduated in the Recording Arts program back in 2000

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
This year started with a great and fun project for us. We are recording ADR for the Netflix series Bloodline. We are also currently working on the audio post and film scoring of a short film called Andante based on a story from Argentinian author Julio Cortazar.

Also worth mentioning is that we recently concluded the audio post for seasons one and two of the MTV show Ridículos, which is the Spanish and Portuguese language adaptations of the original English version of Ridiculousness that currently airs in Latin America and Brazil.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
The first project I ever did for the advertising industry. I was 23 and a recent graduate of Full Sail. All the stars and planets aligned and a campaign for Budweiser — both for the general and US Hispanic markets — landed in my lap. This came from Del Rivero Messianu DDB (currently known as ALMA DDB, Ad Age’s 2017 multicultural agency of the year).

I was living with my parents at the time and had a small home studio in the garage. No Pro Tools, no Digi Beta, just good-old Cool Edit and a VHS player (yes, I manually pressed play on the VHS and Cool Edit to sync my music to picture). Long story short, I ended up writing and producing the music for that TV spot. This led to me unavoidably opening the doors of Histeria Music to the public in 2003.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
iZotope’s RX Post Production Suite, Telos Zephyr Xstream ISDN box and Source Connect. I also use the FabFilter Pro-Q 2 quite a bit.

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
I live in Miami and the beach is my backyard, so I find myself relaxing for hours at the beach on weekends. I love to spend time with my family during my son’s soccer practices and games. When I am really stressed and need to be alone, I tend to brew some crafty beers at home. Great hobby!

One of Lenovo’s new mobile workstations is VR-ready

Lenovo Workstations launched three new mobile workstations at Solidworks World 2017 — the Lenovo ThinkPad P51s and P51, as well as its VR-ready ThinkPad P71.

ThinkPad P51s

The ThinkPad P51s features a new chassis, Intel’s seventh-generation Core i7 processors and the latest Nvidia Quadro workstation graphics, as well as a 4K UHD IPS display with optional IR camera. With all its new features, the ThinkPad P51s still boasts a lightweight, Ultrabook build, shaving off over half a pound from the previous generation. In fact, the P51s is the lightest and thinnest mobile ThinkPad. It also offers Intel Thunderbolt 3 technology with a docking solution, providing users ultra-fast connectivity and the ability to move massive files quickly.

Also new are the ThinkPad P51 — including 4K IPS display with 100 percent color gamut and X-Rite Pantone color calibrator — and the VR-ready ThinkPad P71. These mobile workstations are MIL-SPEC tested and offer a dual-fan cooling system to allow users to push their system harder for use in the field. These two new offerings feature 2400MHz DDR4 memory, along with massive storage. The ThinkPad P71 handles up to four storage devices. These two workstations also feature the latest Intel Xeon processors for mobile workstations and are ISV.

Taking on VR
The VR-ready ThinkPad P71 (our main image) features Nvidia Pascal-based Quadro GPUs and comes equipped with full Oculus and HTC certifications, along with Nvidia’s VR-ready certification.

SuperSphere, a creative VR company is using the P71. “To create high-quality work on the go, our company requires Lenovo’s industry-leading mobile workstations that allow us to put the performance of a tower in our backpacks,” says SuperSphere partner/director Jason Diamond. “Our company’s focus on VR requires us to travel to a number of locations, and the ThinkPad P71 lets us achieve the same level of work on location as we can in the office, with the same functionality.”

The Lenovo P51s will be available in March, starting at $1,049, while the P51 and P71 will be available in April, starting at $1,399 and $1,849, respectively. .

Chris Hill & Sami Tahari

Imaginary Forces expands with EP Chris Hill and director of biz dev Sami Tahari

Imaginary Forces has added executive producer Chris Hill and director of business development Sami Tahari to its Los Angeles studio. The additions come at a time when the creative studio is looking to further expand their cross-platform presence with projects that mix VR/AR/360 with traditional, digital and social media.

Celebrating 20 years in business this year, the independently owned Imaginary Forces is a creative company specializing in brand strategy and visual storytelling encompassing many disciplines, including full-service design, production and post production. Being successful for that long in this business means they are regularly innovating and moving where the industry takes them. This led to the hiring of Hill and Tahari, whose diverse backgrounds will help strengthen the company’s long-standing relationships, as well as its continuous expansion into emerging markets.

Recent work of note includes main titles for Netflix’s beloved Stranger Things, the logo reveal for Michael Bay’s Transformers: The Last Knight and an immersive experience for the Empire State Building.

Hill’s diverse production experience includes commercials, experience design, entertainment marketing and branding for such clients as HBO Sports, Google, A&E and the Jacksonville Jaguars, among others. He joins Imaginary Forces after recently presiding over the broadcast division of marketing agency BPG.

Tahari brings extensive marketing, business and product development experience spanning the tech and entertainment spaces. His resume includes time at Lionsgate and Google, where he was an instrumental leader in the creative development and marketing of Google Glass.

“Imaginary Forces has a proven ability to use design and storytelling across any medium or industry,” adds Hill. “We can expand that ability to new markets, whether it’s emerging technologies, original content or sports franchises. When you consider, for example, the investment in massive screens and new technologies in stadiums across the country, it demands [that] same high level of brand strategy and visual storytelling.”

Our Main Image: L-R: Chris Hill and Sami Tahari.

Sound Lounge offers remote audio post between NYC, Boston

New York City-based Sound Lounge is now providing remote audio post and sound mixing services for clients based in Boston. Sound Lounge Everywhere was established to provide clients with the comforts of a mixing studio and seamless remote connection to Sound Lounge artists — along with video and audio for realtime sessions, all using premiere technology.

In creating this service, Sound Lounge partnered with Boston-based creative editorial company Editbar, who will manage the Sound Lounge Everywhere technology. Custom hardware allows Sound Lounge to stream high-quality audio and video from New York to Boston with virtually zero latency, meaning that clients can view their spots live while their talent records in the New York office. The technology also allows clients to speak face-to-face with their sound mixers to ensure their sessions are both efficient and effective.

“We believe that geography is now an opportunity rather than a boundary, and we’re excited to work with new brands and agencies in this unique fashion,” says Sound Lounge partner, COO and sound designer Marshall Grupp.

Sound Lounge and Editbar (pictured above) are also joining forces with creative studio Nice Shoes, who are in the same space as Sound Lounge, to offer sound, color and creative editorial all underneath one roof.

While Sound Lounge Everywhere is currently only being offered between New York and Boston, the studio expects to offer these services in other cities in the near future.