Author Archives: Randi Altman

MPC DI colorist Jean-Clément Soret adds Technicolor London role

Technicolor London has grown with the addition of colorist Jean-Clément Soret to its DI team. He will take on the role of supervising DI colorist, which is a new role in addition to his current duties at MPC as global creative director of color grading, where he will continue his contribution to advertising campaigns. Soret’s tool of choice is FilmLight Baselight.

Soret is already well known as a DI colorist in the industry, having worked on on films such as 28 Days Later, Hard Candy, The Twilight Saga: Eclipse, Trainspotting 2, In the Heart of the Sea and Steve Jobs. TV series work includes Babylon, Midnight Sun and Black Mirror.

“I’m looking forward to forging new relationships with filmmakers and to continue working with both colorist teams at Technicolor and MPC, as I continue working on both long-form and advertising projects,” says Soret.

Video: Red Sparrow colorist David Hussey talks workflow

After film school, and working as an assistant editor, David Hussey found himself drawn to color grading. He then became an assistant to a colorist and his path was set.

In a recent video interview with the now senior colorist at LA’s Company 3, Hussey talks about the differences of coloring a short-form project versus a long-form film and walks us through his workflow on Red Sparrow, which stars Jennifer Lawrence as a Russian ballerina-turned-spy.

Please watch…

Supersphere offering flypacks for VR/360 streaming

Supersphere, a VR/360° production studio, will be at NAB this year debuting 12G glass-to-glass flypacks optimized for live VR/360° streaming. These multi-geometry (mesh/rectilinear/equirectangular) flypacks can handle 360°, 180°, 4K or HD production and seamlessly mix and match each geometry. They also include built-in VDN (video distribution network) encoding and delivery for live streaming to any platform or custom player.

“Live music, both in streaming and in ticket sales, has posted consistent growth in the US and Worldwide. It’s a multibillion-dollar industry and only getting bigger. We are investing in the immersive streaming market, because we see that trend reflected in our client requests,” explains founder/EP of Supershere. “Clients always want to provide audiences with the most engaging experience possible. An immersive environment is the way to do it.”

Each flypack is standard equipped with Z Cam K1 Pro 180° cameras and Z CAM S1 Pro 360° cameras, and customizable to any camera as productions demand. They are also equipped with Blackmagic’s latest ATEM Production Studio 4K live production switchers to facilitate multi-camera live production across a range of video sources. The included Assimilate Scratch VR Z enables realtime geometry, stitching, color grading, finishing and ambisonic audio. The system also offers fully integrated transcoding and delivery — Teleos Media’s VDN (Video Distribution Network) delivers immersive experiences to any devicewith instant start experience, sustained 16Mbps at high frame rates and 4K + VR resolutions. This allows clients to easily build custom 360° video players on their websites or apps as a destination for live-streamed content, in addition to streaming directly to YouTube, Facebook and other popular platforms.

“These flypacks provide an incredibly robust workflow that takes the complexity out of immersive live production — capable of handling the data required for stunning high-resolution projects in one flexible end-to-end package,” says Wilson. “Plus with Teleos’ VDN capabilities, we make it easy for any client to live stream high-end content directly to whatever device or app best suits their customers’ needs, including the option to quickly build custom, fully integrated 360° live players.”

End of the Line director Jessica Sanders

By Randi Altman

After watching the End of the Line, I found myself thinking about the short film’s content… a lot. Based on a short story by Aimee Bender, director Jessica Sanders’ version starts off with a man walking into a pet store, looking into what the audience assumes is a birdcage and walking out not with a bird but a little man in a cage.

We see how Big Man (Stranger Things’ Brett Gelman) tries to take care of Little Man (Big Bang Theory‘s Simon Helberg) and then we see his frustration when the clearly well-read and intelligent Little Man tells the story of how he was taken from his family and put in a cage. Big Man’s behavior becomes increasingly disturbing, leading him to torture Little Man.

We reached out to director Sanders — who has an Oscar nomination thanks to her short documentary, Sing! — to talk about making the film, which is part of Refinery29 and TNT’s Shatterbox Anthology, a short film series dedicated to supporting the voices of female filmmakers.

Let’s start with cameras. What did you shoot on, and how involved in that process are you?
We shot on the Alexa Mini with Panavision primo lenses. I like to go over lenses/looks with my DP, but defer to what the DP wants to shoot on. For this project, I worked with ultra-talented DP Brett Pawlak.

How long was the shoot, and how much pre-production did you do? I’m assuming a good amount considering the VFX shots?
The film, although short (14 minutes), was essentially a feature in terms of preparation and the production scope/crew size, shooting for six days. We had about two months of intense prep leading up to the shoot, from scouting and art department. For example, we built a 30-foot penis and 30-foot cage. The VFX approach was an intensive collaboration between VFX supervisor Eva Flodstrom, my DP Brett, production designer Justin Trask, producer Louise Shore and myself.

We had 67 VFX shots, so I storyboarded the film early on and then photoboarded each shot when we had our locations. We had a specific VFX/production approach to execute each shot from a mix of practicals (building the giant cage), to strictly greenscreen (i.e., when the little man is on a calculator). It was a highly involved and collaborative process.

Was your VFX supervisor on set?
Yes. Eva was highly involved from the beginning for all of prep, and on set she was instrumental. We worked closely with a DIT video assist so we could do a rough VFX comp of each shot while we were shooting. After production, it took about four months to finish post and visual effects.

I wanted to work with Eva, as she’s a pro, having worked on Star Wars and Star Trek (also, there are very few female VFX supervisors). Our approach/philosophy to VFX was similar — inspired by Michel Gondry’s and Spike Jonze’s work in which the VFX feels human, warm and practical, integral to the story and characters, never distracting.

Can you talk about the challenges of directing a project with VFX?
I had never done a VFX-heavy film before, and creatively, as a director, I wanted to challenge myself. I had a blast and want to do more films with VFX after this experience. Because I surrounded myself with top artists who had VFX experience, it was a totally enjoyable experience. We had a lot of fun making this film!

This was likely a hard story to tell. As the viewer you think it’s going to be a sweet story about a guy and his bird, but then…
I read Aimee Bender’s short story End of the Line in her book Willful Creatures in 2005 and have been passionate about it since then. The story takes the audience on an emotional rollercoaster. It’s funny, dark, explores themes of loneliness, desire and abuse of power, in a short amount of time. There are a lot of tonal shifts, and I worked closely with screenwriter Joanne Giger to achieve this balance.

How did you as a director set out to balance the humor, the sadness, the kinda disturbing stuff, etc.?
I played the film visually and tonally very grounded (i.e. the rules of this world is that there is a big person and tiny person world that live side by side) and from that I could push the humor and darkness. In the performances, I wanted there to be an emotional truth to what the characters are experiencing that feels human and real, despite the fantastical setting. So I played with a lot of the mix of feelings within this very grounded surreal world.

The color is sort of muted in an old-timey kind of way. Can you talk about what you wanted from the color and mood?
I’m very sensitive to color and attention to detail. We wanted the film to feel timeless, although it is contemporary. Costume designer Shirley Kurata is amazing with color blocking and visual storytelling with color. Because Big Man’s world is more depressed and lonely, his tones are gray, the house is dark wood. As Big Man gains power, he wears more color. My DP has a very naturalistic approach with his lighting, so I wanted everything to feel very natural.

When we colored the film later in post, the approach was to do very little to the film, as it was captured in-camera. Production designer Justin Trask is a genius — from how he designed and built the giant penis (to feel less naturalistic) to the details of Little Man’s cage (his furniture, the giant bread crumb on a coin). We had a lot of fun exploring all the miniature props and details in this film.

How did you work with your editors? What did they cut on?
Because of the VFX, we edited on Adobe Premiere. I worked with editor Stephen Berger, who helped shape the film and did an amazing job doing the rough VFX comps in the edit. He is great with music and brought musical inspirations, which led to composer Pedro Bromfman’s entire saxophone score. Pedro is a big composer from Brazil and did my last documentary March of the Living. Editor Claudia Castello is incredible with performance, building the emotional arc of each character. She edited Fruitvale Station, Creed and was an editor on Black Panther. It was a great collaborative experience.

You had a lot of women on the crew. It seems like you went out of your way to find female talent. Why is this so important to you and the industry in general?
As a woman and a woman of Asian descent (I’m half Chinese), it’s important to me to be surrounded by a diverse group of collaborators and to hire with as much gender equality as possible. I love working with talented women and supporting women. The world is a diverse place. It’s important to me to have different perspectives reflected in filmmaking and representation. There is a huge inequality of the hiring practices in Hollywood (4% of Hollywood feature films were directed by women last year), so it’s critical to hire talented, qualified women.

Do you think things are getting better for females in the industry, especially in the more technical jobs?
I’ve always hired female cinematographers, editors and worked with Eva Flodstrom for VFX. With my friend/colleague Rachel Morrison, who is the first female cinematographer nominated for an Oscar, I hope things are changing for women with more visibility and dialogue. Change can only happen by actually hiring talented women (like director Ryan Coogler (Black Panther) who works with female cinematographers and editors).

You’ve directed both narrative and documentary projects. Do you have a preference, or do you enjoy switching back and forth?
This film marks a new creative chapter and narrative direction in my work. I love my background in documentaries, but I am fully focused on narrative filmmaking at the moment.

How was Sundance for you and the film?
Sundance was an incredible experience and platform for the film. We were IndieWire’s Top 10 Must See Films. My creative team came out, including actors Simon Helberg and Vivian Bang. It was a blast!

Tips for Editors: How to get the job

By David Jasse

As a veteran editor and video producer, I’ve held many different positions since I started in the industry — I’ve been the hired help and I’ve been the one doing the hiring. Looking back on these experiences has put me in a good position to share my wisdom. Some of these might seem super-obvious, but they are all based on my recent experience interviewing editors for job openings at my studio…

1. Do your homework about the company you’re meeting with, and think about the client first. Before you tell them where you became really good at your craft (which you should do at the right time) and certainly before you tell them that you’ve been making films since you were five years old, talk about their needs first and read the ad carefully. Research the company and the work they do before you go. Help them make the connection between your skill set and what they do. Sounds obvious, but it’s scary how many editors show inappropriate work for what we do here.

2. Know the software. Go beyond intuitive editing. A lot of people can cut around the timeline. Do you know the shortcuts? Do you have your own personal settings? Maybe you don’t even know what personal setting are. It’s frightening to see people who call themselves professional editors need three key strokes to do something that should take one. Learn the software not just how to edit.

3. Know templates. If you want to be a professional editor, you should leverage templates out there and practice using them. It’s important to employers that you give them a polished look without having to pay for an expensive graphic artist. On the other hand if you’re the storyteller, predator type and you know how to create good content while being the editor, then its fine stick to that – your ability for graphics is irrelevant. I highly recommend becoming expert at templates, whether they be for show opens, lower thirds, or just throughout the video.

4. Living things must grow. Show that you too are growing and advancing. Do you read books? Do you do online tutorials? Do you get to seminars? Software changes all the time. Are you keeping up and advancing?

5. Be tech savvy. You should know how to use a computer and get around the keyboard and Internet. Sounds incredibly obvious, but when an editor sits down at the computer it only takes about 10 seconds to know if they are comfortable. Also, keep your hands on the controls when at a computer or edit station. Take your hands out of your pockets and be ready to edit. It’s like a PA on a set with their hands in their pockets. It’s bad set etiquette… the same goes for editing. Be ready to make changes in the edit.

6. Be prepared to show your work. The “Oh wait, I just have to download it” doesn’t impress.

In addition to the above here are some more general tips:

  • Don’t dress like a slob. Sure you’re creative, and maybe you can work your way to slob once you have the job, but when you come in for the first time dress respectively. Some people get grossed out by bad personal grooming, so don’t rub the person the wrong way with something that later on won’t matter. Look presentable.
  • Stay in touch. When I interview you, I’m immersed in you and getting to know you. Once you’re out the door I’m focused on things that make me money. I don’t remember everybody who comes in the door. There’s a good chance I might forget you, no matter how friendly and engaged I was when you were in my office. If you think you’re a good fit, stay in touch and send work from time to time.
  • Ask questions. I expect candidates to have questions for me, just not ones like this: “Do you pay for my train ticket?” I’m expecting you to ask about what is required of the position, and typical turnaround times, not about your days off and if I will I pay for this or that for you. Ask about advancement in the company, maybe performance-based raises.


David Jasse is the owner and creative director of New York-based DMJ Studios.

Review: Krotos Reformer Pro for customizing sounds

By Robin Shore

Krotos has got to be one of the most.innovative developers of sound design tools in the industry right now. That is a strong statement, but I stand by it. This Scottish company has become well known over the past few years for its Dehumaniser line of products, which bring a fresh approach to the creation of creature vocals and monster sounds. Recently, they released a new DAW plugin, Reformer Pro, which aims to give sound editors creative new ways of accessing and manipulating their sound effects.

Reformer Pro brings a procedural approach to working with sound effects libraries. According to their manual, “Reformer Pro uses an input to control and select segments of prerecorded audio automatically, and recompiles them in realtime, based on the characteristics of the incoming signal.” In layman’s terms this means you can “perform” sound effects from a library in realtime, using only a microphone and your voice.

It’s dead simple to use. A menu inside the plugin lets you choose from a list of libraries that have been pre-analyzed for use with Reformer Pro. Once you’ve loaded up the library you want, all that’s left to do is provide some sort of sonic input and let the magic happen. Whatever sound you put in will be instantly “reformed” into a new sound effect of your choosing. A number of libraries come bundled in when you buy Reformer Pro and additional libraries can be purchased from the Krotos website. The choice to include the Black Leopard library as a default when you first open the plugin was a very good one. There is just something so gratifying about breathing and grunting into a microphone and hearing a deep menacing growl come out the speakers instead of your own voice. It made me an immediate fan.

There are a few knobs and switches that let you tweak the response characteristics of Reformer Pro’s output, but for the most part you’ll be using sound to control things, and the amount of control you can get over the dynamics and rhythm of Reformer Pro’s output is impressive. While my immediate instinct was to drive Reformer Pro by vocalizing through a mic, any sound source can work well as an input. I also got great results by rubbing and tapping my fingers directly against the grill of a microphone and by dragging the mic across the surface of my desk.

Things get even more interesting if you start feeding pre-recorded audio into Reformer Pro. Using a Foley footstep track as the input for library of cloth and leather sounds creates a realistic and perfectly synced rustle track. A howling wind used as the input for a library of creaks and rattles can add a nice layer of texture to a scenes ambience tracks. Pumping music through Reformer Pro can generate some really wacky sounds and is great way to find inspiration and test out abstract sound design ideas.

If the only libraries you could use with Reformer Pro’s were the 100 or so available on the Krotos website it would still be a fun and innovative tool, but its utility would be pretty limited. What makes Reformer Pro truly powerful is its analysis tool. This lets you create custom libraries out of sounds from your own collection. The possibilities here are literally endless. As long as sound exists it can turned into a unique new plugin. To be sure some sounds are better for this than others, but it doesn’t take long at all figure out what kind of sounds will work best and I was pleasantly surprised with how well most of the custom libraries I created turned out. This is a great way to breath new life into an old sound effects collection.

Summing Up
Reformer Pro adds a sense liveliness, creativity and most importantly fun to the often tedious task of syncing sound effects to picture. It’s also a great way to breath new life into an old sound effects collection. Anyone who spends their days working with sound effects would be doing themselves a disservice by not taking Reformer Pro for a test drive, I imagine most will be both impressed and excited by it’s novel approach to sound effects editing and design.

Robin Shore is an audio engineer at NYC’s Silver Sound Studios

Light Iron opens in Atlanta, targets local film community

In order to support the thriving Georgia production community, post studio Light Iron has opened a new facility in Atlanta. The expansion is the fourth since Panavision acquired Light Iron in 2015, bringing Light Iron’s US locations to six total, including Los Angeles, New York, New Orleans, Albuquerque and Chicago.

“Light Iron has been supporting Georgia productions for years through our mobile dailies services,” explains CFO Peter Cioni. “Now with a team on the ground, productions can take advantage of our facility-based dailies with talent that brings the finishing perspective into the process.”

Clark Cofer

The company’s Atlanta staff recently provided dailies services to season one of Kevin (Probably) Saves the World, season three of Greenleaf and the features Uncle Drew and Superfly.

With a calibrated theater, the Light Iron Atlanta facility has hosted virtual DI sessions from its LA facility for cinematographers working in Atlanta. The theater is also available for projecting camera and lens tests, as well as private screenings for up to 45 guests.

The theater is outfitted with a TVIPS Nevion TBG480, which allows for a full bandwidth 2K signal from either their LA or NY facility for virtual DI sessions. For example, if a cinematographer is working another show in Atlanta, they can still connect with the colorist for the final look of their previous show.

The Light Iron Atlanta dailies team uses Colorfront Express Dailies, which is standard across their facility-based and mobile dailies services worldwide.

Cioni notes that the new location is led by director of business development Clark Cofer, a member of Atlanta’s production and post industry. “Clark brings years of local and state-wide relationships to Light Iron, and we are pleased to have him on our growing team.”

Cofer most recently represented Crawford Media Services, where he drove sales for their renowned content services to companies like Lionsgate, Fox and Marvel. He currently serves as co-president of the Georgia Production Partnership, and is on the board of directors for the DeKalb County Film and Entertainment Advisory Board.

Digital locations for Scandal/How to Get Away With Murder crossover

If you like your Thursday night television served up with a little Scandal and How to Get Away With Murder, then you likely loved the recent crossover episodes that paired the two show’s leading ladies. VFX Legion, which has a brick and mortar office in LA but artists all over the world, was called on to create a mix of photorealistic CG environments and other effects that made it possible for the show’s actors to appear in a variety of digital surroundings, including iconic locations in Washington, DC.

VFX Legion has handled all of the visual effects for both shows for almost three years, and is slated to work on the next season of Murder (this is Scandal’s last season). Over the years, the Shondaland Productions have tasked the company with creating high shot counts for almost 100 episodes, each matching the overall look of a single show. However, the crossover episodes required visual effects that blended with two series that use different tools and each have their own look, presenting a more complex set of challenges.

For instance, Scandal is shot on an Arri Alexa camera, and How to Get Away With Murder on a Sony F55, at different color temps and under varying lighting conditions. DP preferences and available equipment required each environment to be shot twice, once with greenscreens for Scandal and then again using bluescreens for Murder.

The replication of the Supreme Court Building is central to the storyline. Building its exterior facade and interiors of the courtroom and rotunda digitally from the ground up were the most complex visual effects created for the episodes.

The process began during preproduction with VFX supervisor Matthew T. Lynn working closely with the client to get a full understanding of their vision. He collaborated with VFX Legion head of production, Nate Smalley, production manager Andrew Turner and coordinators Matt Noren and Lexi Sloan on streamlining workflow and crafting a plan that aligned with the shows’ budgets, schedules, and resources. Lynn spent several weeks on R&D, previs and mockups. Legion’s end-to-end approach was presented to the staffs of both shows during combined VFX meetings, and a plan was finalized.

A rough 3D model of the set was constructed from hundreds of reference photographs stitched together using Agisoft Photoscan and photogrammetry. HDRI panoramas and 360-degree multiple exposure photographs of the set were used to match the 3D lighting with the live-action footage. CG modeling and texturing artist Trevor Harder then added the fine details and created the finished 3D model.

CG supervisor Rommél S. Calderon headed up the team of modeling, texturing, tracking, layout and lighting artists that created Washington, DC’s Supreme Court Building from scratch.

“The computer-generated model of the exterior of the building was a beast, and scheduling was a huge job in itself,” explains Calderon. “Meticulous planning, resource management, constant communication with clients and spot-on supervision were crucial to combining the large volume of shots without causing a bottleneck in VFX Legion’s digital pipeline.”

Ken Bishop, VFX Legion’s lead modeler, ran into some interesting issues while working with footage of the lead characters Olivia Pope and Annalise Keating filmed on the concrete steps of LA’s City Hall. Since the Supreme Court’s staircase is marble, Bishop did a considerable amount of work on the texture, keeping the marble porous enough to blend with the concrete in this key shot.

Compositing supervisor Dan Short led his team through the process of merging the practical photography with renders created with Redshift and then seamlessly composited all of the shots using Foundry’s Nuke.

See their breakdown of the shots here:

Film Stars Don’t Die in Liverpool director Paul McGuigan

By Iain Blair

BAFTA- and Emmy-nominated director and producer Paul McGuigan has made quite a name for himself in film and TV thanks to his gift for handling gritty crime procedurals and atmospheric dramas.

This Scot started out as a still photographer before working his way into the documentary world, helming non-fiction assignments for Channel 4 and the BBC. He made his fiction debut with the short The Granton Star Cause, an adaptation of one of Irvine Welsh’s short stories. The film inspired him to direct two additional self-contained episodes, also adapted from the work of Welsh, stitched together as a well-received omnibus called The Acid House.

Paul McGuigan and Iain Blair

That laid the groundwork for his move into features on a full-time basis, starting with the inventive crime sagas Gangster No. 1 and Lucky Number Slevin. He followed these with the medieval film The Reckoning, the romantic mystery Wicker Park and Victor Frankenstein, starring James McAvoy and Daniel Radcliffe.

Now McGuigan, whose credits include the TV series Sherlock (starring Benedict Cumberbatch) is back with his latest movie, Film Stars Don’t Die in Liverpool, which earned three BAFTA noms. Based on Peter Turner’s memoir of the same name, the film follows the playful but passionate relationship between Peter Turner (Jamie Bell) and the eccentric Academy Award-winning actress Gloria Grahame (Annette Bening) in 1978 Liverpool. What starts as a vibrant affair between a legendary femme fatale and her young lover quickly grows into a deeper relationship, with Peter being the person Gloria turns to for comfort. Their passion and lust for life is tested to the limits by events beyond their control.

I recently talked to McGuigan about making the film.

What was the appeal of this story for you?
Both the book and the script it’s based on were just so interesting, with this whole idea of memory being so fluid. I felt there was a real cinematic world to explore, what with Gloria Grahame being this former big star who won the Oscar for The Bad and The Beautiful, and I liked the idea of this Hollywood icon ending up in this small house in Liverpool. Then you had this very intense love story — and Annette was already attached — and [James Bond producer] Barbara Broccoli had wanted to make it for years and was so passionate about it. I knew I was in good company.

It’s not your usual biopic.
No, I wasn’t interested in that anyway, and this was a very specific part of her life. I wanted to make a very intimate, emotional film, but nothing that was sentimental. Annette said to me when we first met, “This can’t be a film about an old lady dying in a room,” and that really stuck with me, and that’s what we desperately avoided — the violins and all that stuff — because Gloria would have hated that bullshit. She was a tough woman. She had a very interesting life and career, and I think she was way ahead of her time.

What did Annette bring to the role?
It’s hard to define, as she’s so brilliant. She brought a student’s perspective to the character. When we first met, she had a book full of notes, and so many questions about Gloria — things that weren’t even in the script. She just wanted to find out who the real woman was behind the myth and image — all the day-to-day stuff between her and Peter. She did so much research, and then she just arrived on set completely prepared. She’s very method in a way. If she had to be in bed sick, she’d just lie in bed all day and not speak to anyone on the set, and I liked that. The crew would tip toe around her as if she really was sick.

What about Jamie Bell?
He’s amazing and such a smart guy. He’s the kind of actor you can put a camera on, and even though he’s not saying anything, he says everything about the scene with his eyes and expression. That’s what you need since the story’s told from her point of view, and he’s the audience’s connection to it, so you need someone who’s got that natural gift.

I heard it was a very fast shoot with some very inventive set changes. How tough was it?
It was just 40 days, and we shot in Liverpool a bit, mainly for exteriors. All the interiors and the locations in LA and New York were shot on set at Pinewood Studios. I deliberately set out to create a sense of heightened reality by using a lot of back projection in scenes like the beach in LA — the same technique they used in a lot of her noirs, and I didn’t want to do the usual flashbacks to her life or her movies. I wanted the actors to walk through the memories, from one scene to another, and one set to another. So we built sets side to side, and even had one with a bed that revolved 180 degrees, and the camera would just wander off them while they ran around the back to the other set and into another scene. It was a lot of fun to do.

Where did you do the post?
I’m based in Glasgow, and we did all the editing there in a rented office, and then all the rest — sound, VFX, DI — at Pinewood, where they have great post facilities

Do you like post?
I love it because you can just relax and create your film after all the stress of the shoot. I’ve done it for so long now and it’s the most creative part of the whole process for me. The only stress is if you’re doing TV in America as they kick you out after a few days, and I’m like “Whoa! That’s where my work is.” So I always try to stay longer. This was all about so much detail, and I’d sit there every day and not move.

The film was edited by Nick Emerson, who cut Starred Up and Lady Macbeth. You hadn’t worked with him before, right?
Right, but I was big admirer of his work. After my usual editor, Charlie Phillips, passed away, it was great to get Nick. He was in Pinewood with us and would pop in now and again, mainly if we had a problem. I never look at an assembly, ever since I did my first movie — Gangster No. 1, and saw that one and thought seriously about killing myself, it was so bad! I actually thought it was the worst thing I’d ever seen. Luckily someone told me it would turn out fine, and now I just start with first frame, first scene, and look at material and start working on it.

What were the biggest editing challenges?
To keep it simple. The music was a big challenge as we didn’t want any sentimentality. I spent a lot of time working on the score with composer Josh Ralph. Even though I’m not a musician, I always think I am. I’ll sit at the piano and start hitting out stuff out of frustration, as it can be so abstract sometimes, trying to pin down what I want. Music’s so important, and I’ll share all that with actors, the editor, the sound guys, so it gradually evolves. When I started out, I used to think, “Fuck it, I don’t care about sound and music. Just stick stuff on everything and it’s fine.” But now I know better — that music and all the sound is half the movie. So when you’re in Liverpool we had the sound of children playing outside, or the sound of the sea, and in New York you have sirens, traffic and so on. I work very closely with the sound guys to get all the details right and keep it stripped down. I got very obsessed about it and Nick and I did quite a lot of that work in the edit before we even started with the sound team at Pinewood, where we also did the mix.

How many visual effects shots are there in the film?
Very few as we tried to do most of it in-camera. The Liverpool of today is very different, so we had to do a big VFX shot for the ferry sequence, and some cleanup.

The film has a great look. Can you talk about the DI and how that process helped?
We did it at Molinare in London with colorist Asa Shoul, who’s amazing. We shot digitally, on Alexas, and Asa and the DP worked together on it, and I was very involved — annoyingly so, as I began as a photographer and can’t help myself (laughs). Looking back, this post went very smoothly — just 12 weeks, and I’m very happy with the way the film turned out.

Industry insider Iain Blair has been interviewing the biggest directors in Hollywood and around the world for years. He is a regular contributor to Variety and has written for such outlets as Reuters, The Chicago Tribune, The Los Angeles Times and the Boston Globe.

Behind the Title: Encore Senior Colorist Bob Festa

NAME: Bob Festa


Situated in sunny Hollywood, Encore Hollywood offers file-based post services, including HDR Dolby Vision mastering, 4K workflows, near-set dailies and visual effects.

Modern color in the episodic television world means being prepared to contribute on any issue, none more important than beauty fixes. All of the contemporary color tools that we use today have handles for eye sharpening, skin softening, crow’s feet, baggage and mid-tone detail augmentation. Beauty work today can take 50% of the color session time. We help ensure that the actors look their best.

Primarily DaVinci Resolve and FilmLight Baselight.


Almost all projects are conformed or assembled before color even begins. That means all camera RAW shots are assembled on a timeline, in cut order, with transitions and effects. Beyond grading the color of a piece… things like composition, speed, and textural changes like “film grain” or softness are all routine on a daily basis.

I never thought I’d say this, but people. Collaborating with people can be really rewarding and fun. They can really make your day. I’ve had days where 1,000 shots just seem to fly by because of the air in the room.

People. Collaborating with people. Not everyone has a good day every day, and many times whatever attitude or phone call that enters the studio becomes my challenge for the day. Those are the days where it feels like you have been on a single shot all day long.

After realizing that online editing was not for me, supervising feature film telecine sessions made me realize that I could do this. Not only was it highly creative, but it was a black art that had limitless areas where I could contribute. Many of the tools that I used back then, Topsy, Dubner, Prism and EPR were all highly customized, and no two were alike. Romancing color out of a Rank IIIC and threading a magna tech dubber was like wrestling an alligator; it was very physical and fun. It took about six months before I developed confidence and a reasonable eye for good color.

The Last Ship

Yes, executive producer Michael Bay’s The Last Ship (TNT) and Marvel’s Runaways (Hulu), for which I also handle the HDR grade.

It might not be the one I’m most proud of, but it’s one that had my jaw hit the floor in the ‘90s —Joe Pytka’s “Perrier… it’s perfect” commercial. Shot on Aaton 35mm in France, there was just something exceptional about the exposures, even in standard def. Many believe it was the light in Provence, or the quaint French villages or the quality of the water at the lab or Pytka’s genius. Whatever it was it all just worked. It’s still my guilty pleasure to this day. Ironically enough, I worked on this commercial the first time I worked at Encore Hollywood.

I have an expression: “I steal from the best.” I have been so lucky to work with the top creatives again and again. After working with so many talented people in a dark studio for so many years, it’s only natural to liberate some of these great techniques that have worked so well for others. It’s my job to recognize the opportunities to contribute some of those ideas and improvise and combine them for a given shot today.

I have an exercise that I share with young aspiring colorists where I ask them to look at a camera RAW shot and tell me what they see, and how they can contribute color wise. Invariably, they bring something from their past to their color approach. We all use our fields of experience when grading.

Acrylic contemporary art, environmental conservancy or upright jazz bass.

Personally, I’d say digital audio reproduction for home HiFi. German cars for the hours of driving in Los Angeles and cellphones to stay in touch with my loved ones.

Instagram is a great source of color and composition. Existing rules are broken there every day. Larry Bridges a famous editor and owner of Red Car editorial used to say, “Today’s mistakes are tomorrows techniques.”

For a guy who really loves the outdoors, working in a dark studio makes me believe I need to be outside often. Mountain biking… the fun starts when you leave your comfort zone behind.