Author Archives: Randi Altman

Sim Post LA beefs up with Greg Ciaccio and Paul Chapman

It’s always nice when good things happen to good people. Recently, long-time industry post pros Greg Ciaccio and Paul Chapman joined Sim Post LA — Greg as VP of post and Paul as VP of engineering and technology.

postPerspective has known both Greg and Paul for years and often call on them to pick their brains about technology, so having them end up working together warms our hearts.

Sim Post is a division of Sim, which provides end-to-end solutions for TV and feature film production and post production in LA, Vancouver, Toronto, New York and Atlanta.

“I’ll be working with the operations, sales, technology and finance teams to ensure tight integration between departments — always in the service of our clients,” reports Ciaccio. “Our ability to offer end-to-end services is a great advantage in the industry. I’ve admired the work produced by the talented group at Sim Post LA (formerly Chainsaw and Bling), and now I’m pleased to be a part of the team.”

Ciaccio’s resume includes executive operations management positions for creative service divisions at Ascent, Technicolor and Deluxe, and has led product development teams creating products. He also serves as chair of the ASC Motion Imaging Technology Council’s Workflow Committee, currently focused on ACES education and enlightenment, and is a member of the UHD/HDR Committee and Joint ASC/ICG/VES/PGA VR Committee.

Chapman, a Fellow of SMPTE, has held executive technology and engineering positions over the last 30 years, including his long-time role at FotoKem, as well as stints at Unitel Video and others. His skillset includes expertise in storage and networking infrastructure, facility engineering and operations.

“Sim has a lot of potential, and when the opportunity was presented to lead their engineering and technology departments, it really intrigued me,” says Chapman. “The LA facility itself is well constructed from the ground up. I’m looking forward to working with the creative and technical teams across the organization to enhance our technical operations, foster innovation and elevate performance for our clients.”

Greg and Paul are based at Sim’s operations in Hollywood.

Creating CG wildlife for Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle

If you are familiar with the original Jumanji film from 1995 — about a board game that brings its game jungle, complete with animals and the boy it trapped decades earlier, into the present day — you know how important creatures are to the story. In this new version of the film, the game traps four teens inside its video game jungle, where they struggle to survive among the many creatures, while trying to beat the game.

For Columbia Pictures’ current sequel, Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle, Montreal-based visual effects house Rodeo FX was called on to create 96 shots, including some of the film’s wildlife. The film stars Dwayne Johnson, Jack Black and Kevin Hart.

“Director Jake Kasdan wanted the creatures to feel cursed, so our team held back from making them too realistic,” explains Rodeo FX VFX supervisor Alexandre Lafortune. “The hippo is a great example of a creature that would have appeared scary if we had made it look real, so we made it bigger and faster and changed the pink flesh in its mouth to black. These changes make the hippo fit in with the comedy.”

The studio’s shots for the film feature a range of creatures, as well as matte paintings and environments. Rodeo FX worked alongside the film’s VFX supervisor, Jerome Chen, to deliver the director’s vision for the star-studded film.

“It was a pleasure to collaborate with Rodeo FX on this film,” says Chen. “I relied on Alexandre Lafortune and his team to help us with sequences requiring full conceptualization and execution from start to finish.”

Chen entrusted Rodeo FX with the hippo and other key creatures, including the black mamba snake that engages Bethany, played by Jack Black, in a staring contest. The snake was created by Rodeo FX based on a puppet used on set by the actors. Rodeo FX used a 3D scan of the prop and brought it to life in CG, making key adjustments to its appearance, including coloring and mouth shape. The VFX studio also delivered shots of a scorpion, crocodile, a tarantula and a centipede that complement the tone of the film’s villain.

In terms of tools, “We used Maya and Houdini — mainly for water effects — as 3D tools, Zbrush for modeling and Nuke for compositing,” reports Lafortune. “Arnold renderer was used for 3D renders, such as lighting and shading shaders.”

Additional Rodeo FX’s creature work can be seen in IT, The Legend of Tarzan and Paddington 2.

A Conversation: Veteran editor Lawrence Jordan, ACE

By Randi Altman

Lawrence Jordan’s fate was essentially sealed upon birth. His father and his grandfather made a living working in post and film editing in New York City.

He grew up around it; it encircled him. His path became pretty clear at a very young age. “I was very fortunate to be born into a film editing family. The running joke is that a trim bin was my first playpen,” he laughs.

Even with his rich family history, Jordan wasn’t handed a job. He started the way many did, as a runner. “I learned all the things that someone in that job learns about the cutting room — while trying to hone editing skills in my spare time. I then got into the union and became very focused on feature film editing.”

Some of those feature films include Jack Frost, Deuce Bigalow: Male Gigolo, Riding in Cars With Boys, Fallen and Are We There Yet? He also embraced dramatic television series such as NYPD Blue and CSI Miami. He most recently cut a feature for Netflix, called Naked.

Naked

Not long ago, we threw some questions at Jordan, about his love for editing, how he evolved with the technology of industry and his online class, Master the Workflow.

What was your path to editing?
My father, Morton Fallick was a film editor who started Cinemetric, one of the first integrated commercial post companies in New York in the 1960s. He followed in the footsteps of my grandfather, a projection and sound engineer, who helped organize the unions in New York. He worked for CBS News for many years. Because of this history and my love of movies, I knew I wanted to work in film from a very young age.

Many of the film editors who I ended up really admiring came out of my father’s shop. They were young guys who wanted to get into film, and his commercial house was one way to learn the craft. People like Richard Marks, Barry Malkin, Craig McKay and Evan Lottman — they went on to become some of the most respected feature film editors of the ‘70s, ‘80s and beyond.

My first job was as an apprentice in the Warner Bros. film library. Soon after that I got a job as an apprentice sound editor working on a picture the legendary Dede Allen was cutting. It was called Mike’s Murder directed by James Bridges. I worked directly for supervising sound editor Norval Crutcher.

How has editing evolved since you started in the industry?
I started back in the days of 35mm film. It was a completely different industry. The editing community was incredibly small back then. I think there were only about 1,000 or 1,500 people in the entire guild, and we all edited on Moviolas or flatbed machines like the Kem or Steenbeck. Back then, editing was a much slower and more deliberate process. Things were done by hand and ideas were executed at a different pace.

I saw videotape becoming a popular means of editing. Videotape annoyed me because it seemed that it had a lot to do with punching numbers into a keyboard and timecode. Kind of ironic isn’t it? I wasn’t particularly fond of that way of approaching editing. I liked the visceral and physical feeling of handling the actual film. And with the exception of experiments by Francis Coppola, back then, nobody else was cutting features on videotape, so I focused on working in 35mm.

But as time went by, I couldn’t really avoid the technological change. New systems were being developed that used multiple videotapes to approximate the nonlinear nature of editing on film. Then there were systems that worked off of laserdisc, but I was building a career as an assistant in features and none of these new systems really seemed like they were “there” yet.

Then, in 1991, while I was working as additional editor on Jodie Foster’s directorial debut, Little Man Tate, I got a call from my dad who said, “They’re editing off of hard drives now!” He went on to tell me about the Avid Media Composer and how it was being used in commercials. This was very exciting to me because I had started to get into computers in my personal life, and in those days we were all awed by the power of even the most rudimentary computer systems.

I went down to the Avid offices in Burbank and got a demo of Media Composer. I think there were maybe four or five of us in the room, and when I saw the demo, I was floored by the power and simplicity of digital editing. I knew this was what my future was going to be if I was to continue to pursue a career as a film editor.

I spent a year learning everything I could about the Avid system and digital video — the hardware, software and compression algorithms. At the same time, an editor friend of mine, Steve Cohen, who was also into nonlinear editing, asked if I’d be interested in doing a show on the Montage Picture Processor. It was a hybrid/digital version of their multi-deck Betacam system, and just not up handling the demands of a feature-length project. About a week into dailies we decided to make the switch and cut on the Avid. That project was Teamster Boss: The Jackie Presser Story.

How did that change the way you worked as an editor?
With the speed and flexibility of digital, editors were soon expected to do many of the tasks that traditionally were given to other departments. More complex sound editing was first. On films, temp dubs were prepared by the sound department, but this became something you could do pretty well on the Avid. As digital editing evolved and CPU speeds accelerated, it became more common for the film editor to rough-out visual effects. The way it is now, the spectacular VFX that are being done with CGI and the like still have to be subbed out to the VFX team. But you can do an awful lot, especially for temp in the offline.

Today, directors, producers and studios all expect these tasks to be accomplished in the offline. Although you can execute ideas much faster, there’s a ton more work. Additionally, with digital cinematography, editors are getting more footage than ever before. Whereas an average-budget feature might have had 200,000 or 300,000 feet of film on 35mm, now that same project — not even one of the large tent-poles films — could easily have a million feet of dailies. Think about it. By comparison, it took Francis Coppola three years to shoot a million feet of dailies on Apocalypse Now!

Do you have a particular editing philosophy?
If I did, it would be that I let the dailies speak to me. I say this because, of course, we’ve all read the script and talked to the director about his or her vision, but once you actually get the dailies —for any number of reasons — you could be looking at something totally different from what you expected.

This could be affected by whatever the conditions were on the day of production. Or whatever discussions might have gone on between the actors and the director in terms of how they approached a scene or interpreted the script.

So I let the material in front of me dictate how I’m going to make my initial cut on a particular scene. Then it’s a process of looking at the film as a whole and going back to the script and finding the best way to tell the story with the material you have.

You have worked on TV and film. Do you wear a different hat depending on what you are working on?
In television you’re dealing with much tighter schedules. The workflow is highly structured, and although you don’t get as much film every day, you really need to bang scenes out quickly. TV is also a writer/producer’s medium. You only get to work with the director of each episode for a few days and then the producers come in and give you their notes. All of this is usually done in a few weeks’ time.

On feature films, it’s completely different because you’re the head of the department. And even if you’re working with an additional editor, you are communicating directly with the director on a regular basis. A feature film can often go in many more directions than a television show. In the case of comedy, there can be all kinds of improvisation and you are dealing with different situations each day.

When cutting a feature, you’re much more intimately involved in the DNA of the film because you’re living with it for a much longer period of time.

Then, of course, you get into the director’s cut period, which usually lasts around 10 weeks. During this time, you’re typically developing tone, and not only with the story, but in terms of sound effects, music and visual effects. Depending on the situation, the editor is often much more involved in the final mix, color correction and delivery. That level of involvement just doesn’t happen for editors in television.

Do you have a preference in how you work? On-set, near-set?
I guess cutting on-set is happening more often these days, but if I had my preference I’d be in a cutting room near the set. As an editor it’s always nice to have the luxury to be in a quiet space where you can really take in and sort through the material. We want to give it as much thought as possible and have the maximum amount of uninterrupted time to solve whatever problems may come up. I do know that more editors are being asked to edit on-set in real-time. And I guess that’s a necessity for certain films.

During my initial cut, I try to keep it as simple as possible. I’m focusing on two things: story and performance. I try to fill-out my cut with as much sound and music as possible, and as many temp visual effects as necessary. In regard to music, most films nowadays have music supervisors who can be of great help pulling material. Because source cues can be expensive, often they’ve had discussions with the director, even before the editor comes on board.

What system do you work on? Are there any plugins that you use regularly?
I work on the Avid Media Composer. As I said, I was involved with its introduction into feature filmmaking and television in Hollywood, and it’s still the primary tool for 99 percent of all feature films and television shows for studios and networks today.

I know that there are other pieces of software out there, and I’ve had some experience with them, but the longer you work on a tool, the more ingrained it becomes in your muscle memory. With the Avid, the speed at which I can execute ideas is much faster using software that I’ve been working with going on 25 years now.

As far as peripheral software and additional tools, I do like to use Adobe After Effects to work with temp visual effects. It’s a very powerful program. It does have its limitations in terms of getting metadata in and out of the system, but I can create temp comps and the like relatively quickly with it. Of course, there’s Photoshop. I’ve also used Boris FX pretty extensively, and their Mocha tracking tools are pretty amazing.

What are you working on now?
I just finished a feature for Netflix called Naked, starring Marlon Wayans. It’s a comedy that has a tremendous amount of improv. I worked with a great director named Mike Tiddes, with whom I had worked previously on another feature called Fifty Shades of Black.

We had a lot of fun. It was crazy, because for an editor, improv comedy is always challenging —sometimes you’re literally creating stuff that wasn’t shot! It was also exciting because it was for Netflix. Although it didn’t have a theatrical distribution, it was an original film for them and was distributed in 180 countries on the same day.

The power and possibility with the new streaming networks just amazes me. These production companies have tremendous resources and are really giving the film and television production world a shot in the arm — it’s a real boost for employment opportunities for editors and assistants. I think it holds tremendous promise for our industry in general.

How do you work with your assistant editor? Do you give them a chance to cut?
Because I spent 10 years as an assistant, I really have a lot of respect for what they do. Assistants are essentially the glue that holds the editorial process together. Without an assistant who is at the top of their game — focused, organized and generally passionate about what their role is in the process — an editor can really find himself/herself in a pickle.

Today, much of the assistant’s job has become a metadata manager. There are so many different types of media. It’s the same media that we used to have, but it is delivered digitally and in so many different formats.

I always try to give my assistants a shot at cutting at least a scene, if not a couple of scenes, on every project I do. There really is no other way to learn the editing craft, besides having it handed down to you by an editor. To me, this was something that existed when I was coming up and was essentially at the core of the apprenticeship nature of our craft from the time it started. This was how we learned to do our job.

It’s pretty much still the same way, but it’s the proverbial Catch-22. You can’t learn the actual nuts-and-bolts of the job in a cutting room, unless you have a job in a cutting room. You can’t learn this in theory while in film school. They don’t really teach the sort of inner workings of the feature film workflow, or even television workflow in film school. It’s much more of a macro approach — an overview to how the work is done. I’m not aware of any film programs that teach the job of the assistant editor.

NYPD Blue

Now, of course, there are certification courses and specialized schools, but unless you’re working on the front lines on a feature film or television show you’re really not going to get an understanding of the full spectrum of what the job entails.

So, yes, I do try to give my assistants a chance to cut. I also solicit their opinions on scenes that I have cut. I ask for their ideas. I ask for their feedback. I ask whether they remember anything in the dailies that I might have missed. That’s the nature of our work. It’s a collaborative process, and it helps me do my best work.

I hear you are doing something called Master the Workflow. Can you explain what that is?
Yes, Master the Workflow is something my assistant Richard Sanchez and I came up with on our last film, Naked. Richard had developed a comprehensive database in FileMaker that tracks all of the media and metadata created on a feature film. It made me realize how much the job of the assistant editor has changed from when I was an assistant. With the explosion of digital production and post, I thought that it would be of tremendous benefit to detail the critical role that the assistant editor plays in the editorial process.

We decided to create an online education course and named it Feature Film Assistant Editor Immersion 1.0. It takes a potential assistant editor from their initial meeting with their editor through final delivery of a finished film. I felt strongly about creating something like this, primarily because we wanted to show a way for people to learn what goes on in a cutting room in the way it used to be learned.

As I mentioned earlier, there has been an apprenticeship model in post and film editorial throughout its history, but because of digital technology, the editor and the assistants have become somewhat siloed. An assistant doesn’t get to sit in the room with the editor as they are creating the cut as much anymore. So the craft is not being handed down as it was traditionally.

The course is a detailed view of what takes place in the editing environment. For example, we discuss how you deal with the director, how an assistant deals with his editor, how to navigate the sometimes touchy political nature of dealing with producers and studios. Things as simple as when to express your opinion, and when not to.

We wanted to impart all of these things to a new generation of filmmakers and make it available online so that those who might not otherwise have the opportunity to get inside a cutting room and learn how the job is done could learn those skills. We’ve already had our first session with 50 students. They’ve been very, very positive with their feedback and we’re excited to see where it goes.

Dee Rees talks about directing Netflix’s Mudbound

By Iain Blair

Change is good, and while there are only a handful of young, successful, black female directors shooting features these days, the tide is starting to turn. Case in point: Dee Rees, who is helping lead the charge with her powerful new feature Mudbound, which was nominated for two Golden Globes.

Set in the rural American South during World War II, it’s an epic story of two families pitted against one another by a ruthless social hierarchy, yet bound together by the shared farmland of the Mississippi Delta.

Writer Iain Blair and director Dee Rees.

On one side is the McAllan family, newly transplanted from the quiet civility of Memphis and unprepared for the harsh demands of farming. Despite the grandiose dreams of Henry (Jason Clarke), his wife Laura (Carey Mulligan) struggles to keep the faith in her husband’s losing venture.

On the other side are Hap and Florence Jackson (Rob Morgan, Mary J. Blige), sharecroppers who have worked the land for generations and who also struggle bravely to build a small dream of their own despite the rigidly enforced social barriers they face.

The war upends both families’ plans as their returning loved ones, Jamie McAllan (Garrett Hedlund) and Ronsel Jackson (Jason Mitchell), forge a fast but uneasy friendship that challenges the brutal realities of the Jim Crow South in which they live.

The film was co-written by Rees, who made her feature film debut with Pariah, which won a ton of awards. She went on to direct the Emmy-Award-winning HBO film Bessie.

I talked recently with Rees about making the film and the push for more diversity in the industry.

What was your vision for this film?
A good old-fashioned sprawling Hollywood epic that they don’t make anymore, with tons of characters and drama and emotion.

This is a period piece, but there are a lot of the issues you deal with — racism, class, women’s issues, civil rights issues. These are all particularly timely now.
Yes, and I think it’s become more timely because our consciousness has changed. I think it would have been timely five or 10 years ago, but audiences might not have recognized it as such, and attitudes have changed and are still changing about all these issues — and others. Look at all the sex scandal stuff coming to light in Hollywood and other places.

Is it true you absolutely wanted to shoot this in the South, but then found it wasn’t so easy in terms of finding the right locations?
Yes, I’m from the South — Nashville, Tennessee — and I hate seeing Southerners and the South not depicted correctly and accurately, and the locations were vital as they function like another character in the story. So we scouted all over the South — Mississippi, where it’s actually set, and Georgia and Louisiana — and we ended up shooting on a working sugar plantation near New Orleans. The landscape and farmland was perfect. It really gave you the sense of unrelenting nature, and the way the furrows went in the field was a big artistic choice… deciding how the lines were going to go.

It’s interesting that Louisiana has preserved a lot of their slave history. You can see the original sharecroppers’ cabins, and I think it’s right to preserve stuff like that so you can see it actually happened. In Mississippi, a lot of that’s gone. So we used real sharecroppers’ cabins, and convinced the owners to let us move these historical buildings deeper into the fields, as we wanted to have these 360-degree shots where you feel that the characters are all dwarfed by the landscape. All that has an accumulative effect in creating this world. We didn’t use any soundstages at all because I wanted it to look and feel authentic. You just can’t fake all the mud and dust and that landscape.

I imagine the shoot wasn’t easy?
It was pretty intense. We were supposed to have 28 days there, but we got rained out two days and had to make that up. Then we shot for two days in Budapest for the wartime scenes, including a big tank battle. We did that in the morning and then the liberation scenes the next day, and then later, during the edit, we shot the B52 plane scenes at a war museum on Long Island, and that was a big dance between special effects and VFX. So we ended up with 29 days for a big story that you’d normally need 60 days to do justice considering the sheer scope and scale involved.

You had a women DP (Rachel Morrison), who shot Fruitvale Station, and a woman editor (Mako Kamitsuna), who cut Pariah for you and who’s now cutting Johnny Depp’s LAbyrinth as well as a woman composer (Tamar-Kali). Was that deliberate?
Absolutely, but I wanted to make sure it wasn’t just tokenism. Too often hiring women can get conflated with tokenism, and they are women who are incredibly at what they do.

Do you like the post process?
I love it, and it reminds me of writing, which is solitary, contemplative and internal. Production is a frenzied rush, external and exhausting, and then you get to post which is where you recoup in a way, and was just me and Mako making the film. We did most of the editing in an artist’s loft in upstate New York, which was really cheap to rent. I like being away from all the noise and bustle of New York and just isolating for a bit and really focusing. Then Tama, our composer, came in, and then our sound team, and we had the space and time to really build it all up and elevate the raw material.

What were the main editing challenges?
The biggest one was figuring out when to move from one family story to the other. I was worried about staying with the McAllan’s too long, and then suddenly the Jacksons come out of nowhere, maybe too soon, and then having to explain some of the back story out of sequence. So do you break the chronology or trust that when you hand off to the Jacksons it’ll work for the audience? We kept starting with the burial, and then going into all the tensions between the families, with all the questions, like why do they hate each other so much?

In one version we went off with the Jacksons, but it didn’t quite work, and ultimately we started with Henry. He took us to the farm, which takes us to the war, and the war takes us to Ronsel and Jamie, and then it all flowed. But we had to make sure each family had its own trajectory, and one exercise we did was to edit just one family story as if it was its own film. Then we did the other family to see where it worked, where it didn’t, and where the natural intersections fell in their stories. That was so helpful.

Can you talk about the importance of sound and music in Mudbound?
It’s so important to me, and I always want the score to work seamlessly with the sound design so it feels like it comes out of the sound design. Like with the editing, I feel the music shouldn’t be used as an emotional crutch, so once we had picture locked Tamar came in and then reacted to it with her score, and I didn’t have to say much to her.

She was inspired and wrote this beautiful orchestral score, which was perfect because I didn’t want to have the obvious 1940s thing with banjo, blues and harmonica. I wanted strings, and my sound team did a fantastic job. We did a Atmos mix at Harbor in New York, thanks to a Dolby grant, and it was so cool and exciting to do that.

This is obviously a performance-driven piece, but there must have been a fair amount of visual effects?
Mr. X Gotham did them all, and we had quite a lot for the plane scenes, including the B52 formation and the tank battle scenes. They also added some explosions, and there was cleanup work, but all the farm stuff — the mud and water — was all real and in-camera. We used a lot of special effects — squibs and gore packs — for the war scenes.

What about the DI?
We did it at Harbor Post in New York, and the colorist was Joe Gawler (who worked on Blackmagic Resolve). He did a really great job.

Did it all turn out the way you pictured?
It did and I’m really happy with it.

Mudbound is making a lot of Oscar and other awards noise right now — deservedly so. What does that mean to you?
It’s very exciting for all the crafts people involved. I feel we made a great film, but without a huge budget, so the more attention the better.

There’s been a lot of talk about the lack of opportunity for women and minorities in Hollywood. Are things improving?
Very slowly, but a lot of the problem is the pipeline. We need more creatives able to get in the door. The Academy is just a receptacle at the end of the pipeline. We can change its make up, but the bigger thing is changing what’s getting made.


Industry insider Iain Blair has been interviewing the biggest directors in Hollywood and around the world for years. He is a regular contributor to Variety and has written for such outlets as Reuters, The Chicago Tribune, The Los Angeles Times and the Boston Globe.

Peter Doyle on coloring Churchill’s England for Darkest Hour

By Daniel Restuccio

Technicolor supervising digital colorist Peter Doyle is pretty close to being a legend in the movie industry. He’s color graded 12 of the 100 top box office movies, including Peter Jackson’s Lord of the Rings trilogy, six Harry Potter films, Aleksander Sokurov’s Venice Golden Lion-winning Faust, Joel and Ethan Coen’s Inside Llewyn Davis, The Ballad of Buster Scruggs and most recently the Golden Globe-nominated Darkest Hour.

Grading Focus Features’ Darkest Hour — which focuses on Winston Churchill’s early days as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom during WWII — represents a reunion for Doyle. He previously worked with director Joe Wright (Pan) and director of photography Bruno Delbonnel (Inside Llewyn Davis).

Peter Doyle

The vibe on Darkest Hour, according to Doyle, was very collaborative and inspiring. “Joe is an intensely visual director and has an extraordinary aesthetic… visually, he’s very considerate and very aware. It was just great to throw out ideas, share them and work to find what would be visually appropriate with Bruno in terms of his design of light, and what this world should look like.”

All the time, says Doyle, they worked to creatively honor Joe’s overall vision of where the film should be from both the narrative and the visual viewpoint.

The creative team, he continues, was focused on what they hoped to achieve in terms of “the emotional experience with the visuals,” what did they want this movie to look like and, technically, how could they get the feeling of that imagery onto the screen?

Research and Style Guide
They set about to build a philosophy of what the on-screen vision of the film would be. That turned into a “style guide” manifesto of actually how to get that on screen. They knew it was the 1940s during World War II, so logically they examined newsreels and the cameras and lenses that were used at the time. One of the things that came out of the discussions with Joe and Bruno was the choice of the 1.85:1 aspect ratio. “It’s quite an ensemble cast and the 2.35:1 would let you spread the cast across the screen, but wide 1.85:1 felt most appropriate for that.”

Doyle also did some research at the Victoria and Albert Museum’s very large photographic collection and dug into his own collection of photographic prints made with alternate color processes. Sepia and black and white got ruled out. They investigated the color films of the time and settled in on the color work of Edward Steichen.

Delbonnel chose Arri Alexa SXT cameras and Cooke S4s and Angenieux zoom lenses. They mastered in ArriRaw 3.2K. Technicolor has technology that allowed Doyle to build a “broad stroke” color-model-based emulation of what the color processes were like in the ’40s and apply that to the Alexa. “The idea,” explains Doyle, “was to take the image from the Alexa camera and mold it into an approximation of what the color film stocks would have looked like at the time. Then, having got into that world, tweak it slightly, because that’s quite a strong look,” and they still needed it to be “sensitive to the skin tones of the actors.”

Color Palette and Fabrics
There was an “overall arc” to this moment in history, says Doyle. The film’s setting was London during WWII, and outside it was hot and sunny. Inside, all lights were dimmed filaments, and that created a scenario where visually they would have extremely high-contrast images. All the colors were natural-based dyes, he explains, and the fabrics were various kind of wools and silks. “The walls and the actual environment that everyone would have been in would be a little run down. There would have been quite a patina and texture on the walls, so a lot of dirt and dust. These were kind of the key points that they gave me in order to work something out.”

Doyle’s A-ha Moment
“I took some hero shots of Kristin Scott Thomas (Clementine Churchill) and Gary Oldman (Winston Churchill), along with a few of the other actors, from Bruno’s rushes,” explains Doyle, adding that those shots became his reference.

From those images he devised different LUTs (Look Up Tables) that reflected different kinds of color manipulation processes of the time. It also meant that during principal photography they could keep referencing how the skin tones were working. There are a lot of close-ups and medium close-ups in Darkest Hour that gave easy access to the performance, but it also required them to be very aware of the impact of lighting on prosthetics and makeup.

Doyle photographed test charts on both 120mm reversal film of Ektachrome he had sitting in his freezer from the late ’70s and the Alexa. “The ‘a-ha moment’ was when we ran a test image through both. It was just staggering how different the imagery really looked. It gave us a good visual reference of the differences between film and digital, but more accurately the difference between reversal film and digital. It allowed us to zero in on the reactions of the two imaging methods and build the show LUTs and emulation of the Steichen look.”

One Word
When Doyle worked on Llewelyn Davis, Delbonnel and the Coen brothers defined the look of the film with one word: “sad.” For Darkest Hour, the one word used was “contrast,” but as a multi-level definition not just in the context of lights and darks in the image. “It just seemed to be echoed across all the various facets of this film,” says Doyle. “Certainly, Darkest Hour is a story of contrasting opinions. In terms of story and moments, there are soldiers at war in trenches, whilst there are politicians drinking champagne — certainly contrast there. Contrast in terms of the environment with the extreme intense hot summer outside and the darkness and general dullness on the inside.”

A good example, he says, is “the Parliament House speech that’s being delivered with amazing shafts of light that lit up the environment.”

The DP’s Signature
Doyle feels that digital cinematography tends to “remove the signature” of the director of photography, and that it’s his job to put it back. “In those halcyon days of film negative, there were quite a lot of processes that a DP would use in the lab that would become part of the image. A classic example, he says, is Terrence Malick’s Days of Heaven, which was shot mostly during sunrise and sunset by Nestor Almendros, and “the extraordinary lightness of the image. Or Stanley Kubrick’s Barry Lyndon, which was shot by John Alcott with scenes lit entirely by candles “that have a real softness.” The looks of those movies are a combination of the cinematographer’s lighting and work with the lab.

“A digital camera is an amazing recording device. It will faithfully reproduce what it records on set,” says Doyle. “What I’ve done with Bruno in the testing stage is bring back the various processes that you would possibly do in the lab, or at least the concept of what you would do in the laboratory. We’re really bending and twisting the image. Everyone sees the film the way that the DP intends, and then everyone’s relationship with that film is via this grade.”

This is why it’s so important to Doyle to have input from day one rushes through to the end. He’s making sure the DP’s “signature” is consistent to final grade. On Darkest Hour they tested, built and agreed on a look for the film for rushes. Colorist Mel Kangleon worked with Delbonnel on a daily basis to make sure all the exposures were correct from a technical viewpoint. Also, aesthetically to make sure the grade and look were not being lost.

“The grades that we were doing were what was intended by Bruno, and we made sure the actual imagery on the screen was how he wanted it to be,” explains Doyle. “We were making sure that the signature was being carried through.”

Darkest Hour and HDR
On Darkest Hour, Doyle built the DCI grade for the Xenon projector, 14 foot-lambert, as the master color corrected deliverable. “Then we took what was pretty much the LAD gray-card value of that DCI grade. So a very classic 18% gray that was translated across to the 48-, the 108-, the 1,000- and the 4,000-nit grade. We essentially parked the LAD gray (18% gray) at what we just felt was an appropriate brightness. There is not necessarily a lot of color science to that, other than saying, ‘this feels about right.’ That’s (also) very dependent on the ambient light levels.”

The DCI projector, notes Doyle, doesn’t really have “completely solid blacks; they’re just a little gray.” Doyle wished that the Xenon could’ve been brighter, but that is what the theatrical distribution chain is at the moment, he says.

When they did the HDR (High Dynamic Range) version, which Doyle has calls as a “new language” of color correction, they took the opportunity to add extra contrast and dial down the blacks to true black. “I was able to get some more detail in the lower shadows, but then have absolutely solid blacks —  likewise on the top end. We opened up the highlights to be even more visceral in their brightness. Joe Wright says he fell in love with the Dolby Vision.”

If you’re sitting in a Dolby Vision Cinema, says Doyle, you’re sitting in a black box. “Therefore, you don’t necessarily need to have the image as bright as a Rec 709 grade or LAD gray, which is typically for a lounge room where there are some lights on. There is a definite ratio between the presumed ambient light level of a room and where they park that LAD,” explains Doyle.

Knowing where they want the overall brightness of the film to be, they translate the tone curve to maintain exactly what they did in the DCI grade. Then perceptually it appears the same in the various mediums. Next they custom enhance each grade for the different display formats. “I don’t really necessarily call it a trim pass; it’s really adding a flare pass,” elaborates Doyle. “A DCI projector has quite a lot of flare, which means it’s quite organic and reactive to the image. If you project something on a laser, it doesn’t necessarily have anywhere near that amount of flair, and that can be a bit of a shock. Suddenly, your highlights are looking incredibly harsh. We went through and really just made sure that the smoothness of the image was maintained and emulated on the other various mediums.”

Doyle also notes that Darkest Hour benefited from the results of his efforts working with Technicolor color scientists Josh Pines and Chris Kutchka, working on new color modeling tools and being able “to build 3D LUTs that you can edit and that are cleaner. That can work in a little more containable way.”

Advice and Awards
In the bright new world of color correction, what questions would Doyle suggest asking directors? “What is their intent emotionally with the film? How do they want to reinforce that with color? Is it to be approached in a very literal way, or should we think about coming up with some kind of color arc that might be maybe counter intuitive? This will give you a feel for the world that the director has been thinking of, and then see if there’s a space to come at it from a slightly unexpected way.”

I asked Doyle if we have reached the point where awards committees should start thinking about an Academy Award category for color grading.

Knowing what an intensely collaborative process color grading is, Doyle responded that it would be quite challenging. “The pragmatist in me says it could be tricky to break it down in terms of the responsibilities. It depends on the relationship between the colorist, the DP and the director. It really does change with the personalities and the crew. That relationship could make the breakdown a little tricky just to work out whose idea was it to actually make it, for example, blue.”

Because this interview was conducted in December, I asked Doyle, what he would ask Santa to bring him for Christmas. His response? “I really think the new frontier is gamut mapping and gamut editing — that world of fitting one color space into another. I think being able to edit those color spaces with various color models that are visually more appropriate is pretty much the new frontier.”


Daniel Restuccio is a producer and teacher based in Southern California.

Industry mainstay Click3X purchased by Industrial Color Studios

Established New York City post house Click3X has been bought by Industrial Color Studios. Click3X is a 25-year-old facility that specializes in new media formats such as VR, AR, CGI and live streaming. Industrial Color Studios is a visual content production company. Founded in 1992, Industrial Color’s services range from full image capture and e-commerce photography to production support and post services, including creative editorial, color grading and CG.

With offices in New York and LA, Industrial Color has developed its own proprietary systems to support online digital asset management for video editing and high-speed file transfers for its clients working in broadcast and print media. The company is an end-to-end visual content production provider, partnering with top brands, agencies and creative professionals to accelerate multi-channel creative content.

Click3X was founded in 1993 by Peter Corbett, co-founder of numerous companies specializing in both traditional and emerging forms of media.  These include Media Circus (a digital production and web design company), IllusionFusion, Full Blue, ClickFire Media, Reason2Be, Sound Lounge and Heard City. A long-time member of the DGA as a commercial film director, Corbett emigrated to the US from Australia to pursue a career as a commercial director and, shortly thereafter, segued into integrated media and mixed media, becoming one of the first established film directors to do so.

Projects produced at Click3X have been honored with the industry’s top awards, including Cannes Lions, Clios, Andy Awards and others. Click3X also was presented with the Crystal Apple Award, presented by the New York City Mayor’s Office of Media and Entertainment, in recognition of its contributions to the city’s media landscape.

Corbett will remain in place at Click3X and eventually the companies will share the ICS space on 6th Avenue in NYC.

“We’ve seen a growing need for video production capabilities and have been in the market for a partner that would not only enhance our video offering, but one that provided a truly integrated and complementary suite of services,” says Steve Kalalian, CEO of Industrial Color Studios. “And Click3X was the ideal fit. While the industry continues to evolve at lightning speed, I’ve long admired Click3X as a company that’s consistently been on the cutting edge of technology as it pertains to creative film, digital video and new media solutions. Our respective companies share a passion for creativity and innovation, and I’m incredibly excited to share this unique new offering with our clients.”

“When Steve and I first entered into talks to align on the state of our clients’ future, we were immediately on the same page,” says Corbett, president of Click3X. “We share a vision for creating compelling content in all formats. As complementary production providers, we will now have the exciting opportunity to collaborate on a robust and highly-regarded client roster, but also expand the company’s creative and new media capabilities, using over 200,000 square feet of state-of-the-art facilities in New York, Los Angeles and Philadelphia.”

The added capabilities Click3X gives Industrial Color in video production and new media mirrors its growth in the field of e-commerce photography and image capture. The company has recently opened a new 30,000 square-foot studio in downtown Los Angeles designed to produce high-volume, high-quality product photography for advertisers. That studio complements the company’s existing e-commerce photography hub in Philadelphia.

Main Image: (L-R) Peter Corbett and Steve Kalalian

VES names award nominees

The Visual Effects Society (VES) has announced the nominees for its 16th Annual VES Awards, which recognize visual effects artistry and innovation in film, animation, television, commercials and video games and the VFX supervisors, VFX producers and hands-on artists who bring this work to life.

Blade Runner 2049 and War for the Planet of the Apes have tied for the most feature film nominations with seven each. Despicable Me 3 is the top animated film contender with five nominations, and Game of Thrones leads the broadcast field and scores the most nominations overall with 11.

Nominees in 24 categories were selected by VES members via events hosted by 10 of its sections, including Australia, the Bay Area, London, Los Angeles, Montreal, New York, New Zealand, Toronto, Vancouver and Washington. The VES Awards will be held on February 13 at the Beverly Hilton Hotel. The VES Georges Méliès Award will be presented to Academy Award-winning visual effects supervisor Joe Letteri, VES. The VES Lifetime Achievement Award will be presented to producer/writer/director Jon Favreau. Comedian Patton Oswalt will once again host.

Here are the nominees:

Outstanding Visual Effects in a Photoreal Feature

 

Blade Runner 2049

John Nelson

Karen Murphy Mundell

Paul Lambert

Richard Hoover

Gerd Nefzer

 

Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2

Christopher Townsend

Damien Carr

Guy Williams

Jonathan Fawkner

Dan Sudick

Kong: Skull Island

Jeff White

Tom Peitzman

Stephen Rosenbaum

Scott Benza

Michael Meinardus

 

Star Wars: The Last Jedi

Ben Morris

Tim Keene

Eddie Pasquarello

Daniel Seddon

Chris Corbould

 

War for the Planet of the Apes

Joe Letteri

Ryan Stafford

Daniel Barrett

Dan Lemmon

Joel Whist

 

Outstanding Supporting Visual Effects in a Photoreal Feature

 

Darkest Hour

Stephane Naze

Warwick Hewitt

Guillaume Terrien

Benjamin Magana

Downsizing

James E. Price

Susan MacLeod

Lindy De Quattro

Stéphane Nazé

 

Dunkirk

Andrew Jackson

Mike Chambers

Andrew Lockley

Alison Wortman

Scott Fisher

 

Mother!

Dan Schrecker

Colleen Bachman

Ben Snow

Wayne Billheimer

Peter Chesney

 

Only the Brave

Eric Barba

Dione Wood

Matthew Lane

Georg Kaltenbrunner

Michael Meinardus

 

Outstanding Visual Effects in an Animated Feature

 

Captain Underpants

David Soren

Mark Swift

Mirielle Soria

David Dulac

 

Cars 3

Brian Fee

Kevin Reher

Michael Fong

Jon Reisch

Coco

Lee Unkrich

Darla K. Anderson

David Ryu

Michael K. O’Brien

 

Despicable Me 3

Pierre Coffin

Chris Meledandri

Kyle Balda

Eric Guillon

 

The Lego Batman Movie

Rob Coleman

Amber Naismith

Grant Freckelton

Damien Gray

The Lego Ninjago Movie

Gregory Jowle

Fiona Chilton

Miles Green

Kim Taylor

 

Outstanding Visual Effects in a Photoreal Episode

 

Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.: Orientation Part 1

Mark Kolpack

Sabrina Arnold

David Rey

Kevin Yuille

Gary D’Amico

 

Game of Thrones: Beyond the Wall

Joe Bauer

Steve Kullback

Chris Baird

David Ramos

Sam Conway

 

Legion: Chapter 1

John Ross

Eddie Bonin

Sebastien Bergeron

Lionel Lim

Paul Benjamin

 

Star Trek: Discovery: The Vulcan Hello

Jason Michael Zimmerman

Aleksandra Kochoska

Ante Dekovic

Mahmoud Rahnama

 

Stranger Things 2: The Gate

Paul Graff

Christina Graff

Seth Hill

Joel Sevilla

Caius the Man

 

Outstanding Supporting Visual Effects in a Photoreal Episode

 

Black Sails: XXIX

Erik Henry

Terron Pratt

Yafei Wu

David Wahlberg

Paul Dimmer

 

Fear the Walking Dead: Sleigh Ride

Peter Crosman

Denise Gayle

Philip Nussbaumer

Martin Pelletier

Frank Ludica

 

Mr. Robot: eps3.4_runtime-err0r.r00

Ariel Altman

Lauren Montuori

John Miller

Luciano DiGeronimo

 

Outlander: Eye of the Storm

Richard Briscoe

Elicia Bessette

Aladino Debert

Filip Orrby

Doug Hardy

 

Taboo: Pilot

Henry Badgett

Tracy McCreary

Nic Birmingham

Simon Rowe

Colin Gorry

 

Vikings: On the Eve

Dominic Remane

Mike Borrett

Ovidiu Cinazan

Paul Wishart

Paul Byrne

 

Outstanding Visual Effects in a Real-Time Project

 

Assassin’s Creed Origins

Raphael Lacoste

Patrick Limoges

Jean-Sebastien Guay

Ulrich Haar

 

Call of Duty: WWII

Joe Salud

Atsushi Seo

Danny Chan

Jeremy Kendall

 

Fortnite: A Hard Day’s Night

Michael Clausen

Gavin Moran

Brian Brecht

Andrew Harris

 

Sonaria

Scot Stafford

Camille Cellucci

Kevin Dart

Theresa Latzko

 

Uncharted: The Lost Legacy

Shaun Escayg

Tate Mosesian

Eben Cook

 

Outstanding Visual Effects in a Commercial

 

Beyond Good and Evil 2

Leon Berelle

Maxime Luère

Dominique Boidin

Remi Kozyra

 

Kia Niro: Hero’s Journey

Robert Sethi

Anastasia von Rahl

Tom Graham

Chris Knight

Dave Peterson

 

Mercedes Benz: King of the Jungle

Simon French

Josh King

Alexia Paterson

Leonardo Costa

 

Monster: Opportunity Roars

Ruben Vandebroek

Clairellen Wallin

Kevin Ives

Kyle Cody

 

Samsung: Do What You Can’t, Ostrich

Diarmid Harrison-Murray

Tomek Zietkiewicz

Amir Bazazi

Martino Madeddu

 

Outstanding Visual Effects in a Special Venue Project

 

Avatar: Flight of Passage

Richard Baneham

Amy Jupiter

David Lester

Thrain Shadbolt

 

Corona: Paraiso Secreto

Adam Grint

Jarrad Vladich

Roberto Costas Fernández

Ed Thomas

Felipe Linares

 

Guardians of the Galaxy: Mission: Breakout!

Jason Bayever

Amy Jupiter

Mike Bain

Alexander Thomas

 

National Geographic Encounter: Ocean Odyssey

Thilo Ewers

John Owens

Gioele Cresce

Mariusz Wesierski

 

Nemo and Friends SeaRider

Anthony Apodaca

Kathy Janus

Brandon Benepe

Nick Lucas

Rick Rothschild

 

Star Wars: Secrets of the Empire

Ben Snow

Judah Graham

Ian Bowie

Curtis Hickman

David Layne

 

Outstanding Animated Character in a Photoreal Feature

 

Blade Runner 2049: Rachael

Axel Akkeson

Stefano Carta

Wesley Chandler

Ian Cooke-Grimes

Kong: Skull Island: Kong

Jakub Pistecky

Chris Havreberg

Karin Cooper

Kris Costa

 

War for the Planet of the Apes: Bad Ape

Eteuati Tema

Aidan Martin

Florian Fernandez

Mathias Larserud

War for the Planet of the Apes: Caesar

Dennis Yoo

Ludovic Chailloleau

Douglas McHale

Tim Forbes

 

Outstanding Animated Character in an Animated Feature

 

Coco: Hèctor

Emron Grover

Jonathan Hoffman

Michael Honsel

Guilherme Sauerbronn Jacinto

 

Despicable Me 3: Bratt

Eric Guillon

Bruno Dequier

Julien Soret

Benjamin Fournet

 

The Lego Ninjago Movie: Garma Mecha Man

Arthur Terzis

Wei He

Jean-Marc Ariu

Gibson Radsavanh

 

The Boss Baby: Boss Baby

Alec Baldwin

Carlos Puertolas

Rani Naamani

Joe Moshier

 

The Lego Ninjago Movie: Garmadon

Matthew Everitt

Christian So

Loic Miermont

Fiona Darwin

 

Outstanding Animated Character in an Episode or Real-Time Project

 

Black Mirror: Metalhead

Steven Godfrey

Stafford Lawrence

Andrew Robertson

Lestyn Roberts

 

Game of Thrones: Beyond the Wall – Zombie Polar Bear

Paul Story

Todd Labonte

Matthew Muntean

Nicholas Wilson

 

Game of Thrones: Eastwatch – Drogon Meets Jon

Jonathan Symmonds

Thomas Kutschera

Philipp Winterstein

Andreas Krieg

 

Game of Thrones: The Spoils of War – Drogon Loot Train Attack

Murray Stevenson

Jason Snyman

Jenn Taylor

Florian Friedmann

 

Outstanding Animated Character in a Commercial

 

Beyond Good and Evil 2: Zhou Yuzhu

Dominique Boidin

Maxime Luère

Leon Berelle

Remi Kozyra

 

Mercedes Benz: King of the Jungle

Steve Townrow

Joseph Kane

Greg Martin

Gabriela Ruch Salmeron

 

Netto: The Easter Surprise – Bunny

Alberto Lara

Jorge Montiel

Anotine Mariez

Jon Wood

 

Samsung: Do What You Can’t – Ostrich

David Bryan

Maximilian Mallmann

Tim Van Hussen

Brendan Fagan

 

Outstanding Created Environment in a Photoreal Feature

 

Blade Runner 2049: Los Angeles

Chris McLaughlin

Rhys Salcombe

Seungjin Woo

Francesco Dell’Anna

 

Blade Runner 2049: Trash Mesa

Didier Muanza

Thomas Gillet

Guillaume Mainville

Sylvain Lorgeau

Blade Runner 2049: Vegas

Eric Noel

Arnaud Saibron

Adam Goldstein

Pascal Clement

 

War for the Planet of the Apes: Hidden Fortress

Greg Notzelman

James Shaw

Jay Renner

Gak Gyu Choi

 

War for the Planet of the Apes: Prison Camp

Phillip Leonhardt

Paul Harris

Jeremy Fort

Thomas Lo

 

Outstanding Created Environment in an Animated Feature

 

Cars 3: Abandoned Racetrack

Marlena Fecho

Thidaratana Annee Jonjai

Jose L. Ramos Serrano

Frank Tai

 

Coco: City of the Dead

Michael Frederickson

Jamie Hecker

Jonathan Pytko

Dave Strick

 

Despicable Me 3: Hollywood Destruction

Axelle De Cooman

Pierre Lopes

Milo Riccarand

Nicolas Brack

 

The Lego Ninjago Movie: Ninjago City

Kim Taylor

Angela Ensele

Felicity Coonan

Jean Pascal leBlanc

 

Outstanding Created Environment in an Episode, Commercial or Real-Time Project

 

Assassin’s Creed Origins: City of Memphis

Patrick Limoges

Jean-Sebastien Guay

Mikael Guaveia

Vincent Lombardo

 

Game of Thrones: Beyond the Wall – Frozen Lake

Daniel Villalba

Antonio Lado

José Luis Barreiro

Isaac de la Pompa

 

Game of Thrones: Eastwatch

Patrice Poissant

Deak Ferrand

Dominic Daigle

Gabriel Morin

 

Still Star-Crossed: City

Rafael Solórzano

Isaac de la Pompa

José Luis Barreiro

Óscar Perea

 

Stranger Things 2: The Gate

Saul Galbiati

Michael Maher

Seth Cobb

Kate McFadden

 

Outstanding Virtual Cinematography in a Photoreal Project

 

Beauty and the Beast: Be Our Guest

Shannon Justison

Casey Schatz

Neil Weatherley

Claire Michaud

 

Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2: Groot Dance/Opening Fight

James Baker

Steven Lo

Alvise Avati

Robert Stipp

 

Star Wars: The Last Jedi – Crait Surface Battle

Cameron Nielsen

Albert Cheng

John Levin

Johanes Kurnia

 

Thor: Ragnarok – Valkyrie’s Flashback

Hubert Maston

Arthur Moody

Adam Paschke

Casey Schatz

 

Outstanding Model in a Photoreal or Animated Project

 

Blade Runner 2049: LAPD Headquarters

Alex Funke

Steven Saunders

Joaquin Loyzaga

Chris Menges

 

Despicable Me 3: Dru’s Car

Eric Guillon

François-Xavier Lepeintre

Guillaume Boudeville

Pierre Lopes

 

Life: The ISS

Tom Edwards

Chaitanya Kshirsagar

Satish Kuttan

Paresh Dodia

 

US Marines: Anthem – Monument

Tom Bardwell

Paul Liaw

Adam Dewhirst

 

Outstanding Effects Simulations in a Photoreal Feature

 

Kong: Skull Island

Florent Andorra

Alexis Hall

Raul Essig

Branko Grujcic

 

Only the Brave: Fire & Smoke

Georg Kaltenbrunner

Thomas Bevan

Philipp Zaufel

Himanshu Joshi

 

Star Wars: The Last Jedi – Bombing Run

Peter Kyme

Miguel Perez Senent

Ahmed Gharraph

Billy Copley

Star Wars: The Last Jedi – Mega Destroyer Destruction

Mihai Cioroba

Ryoji Fujita

Jiyong Shin

Dan Finnegan

 

War for the Planet of the Apes

David Caeiro Cebrián

Johnathan Nixon

Chet Leavai

Gary Boyle

 

Outstanding Effects Simulations in an Animated Feature

 

Cars 3

Greg Gladstone

Stephen Marshall

Leon JeongWook Park

Tim Speltz

 

Coco

Kristopher Campbell

Stephen Gustafson

Dave Hale

Keith Klohn

 

Despicable Me 3

Bruno Chauffard

Frank Baradat

Milo Riccarand

Nicolas Brack

Ferdinand

Yaron Canetti

Allan Kadkoy

Danny Speck

Mark Adams

 

The Boss Baby

Mitul Patel

Gaurav Mathur

Venkatesh Kongathi

 

Outstanding Effects Simulations in an Episode, Commercial or Real-Time Project

 

Game of Thrones: Beyond the Wall – Frozen Lake

Manuel Ramírez

Óscar Márquez

Pablo Hernández

David Gacituaga

 

Game of Thrones: The Dragon and the Wolf – Wall Destruction

Thomas Hullin

Dominik Kirouac

Sylvain Nouveau

Nathan Arbuckle

 

Heineken: The Trailblazers

Christian Bohm

Andreu Lucio Archs

Carsten Keller

Steve Oakley

 

Outlander: Eye of the Storm – Stormy Seas

Jason Mortimer

Navin Pinto

Greg Teegarden

Steve Ong

 

Outstanding Compositing in a Photoreal Feature

 

Blade Runner 2049: LAPD Approach and Joy Holograms

Tristan Myles

Miles Lauridsen

Joel Delle-Vergin

Farhad Mohasseb

 

Kong: Skull Island

Nelson Sepulveda

Aaron Brown

Paolo Acri

Shawn Mason

 

Thor: Ragnarok: Bridge Battle

Gavin McKenzie

David Simpson

Owen Carroll

Mark Gostlow

 

War for the Planet of the Apes

Christoph Salzmann

Robin Hollander

Ben Morgan

Ben Warner

 

Outstanding Compositing in a Photoreal Episode

 

Game of Thrones: Beyond the Wall – Frozen Lake

Óscar Perea

Santiago Martos

David Esteve

Michael Crane

 

Game of Thrones: Eastwatch

Thomas Montminy Brodeur

Xavier Fourmond

Reuben Barkataki

Sébastien Raets

 

Game of Thrones: The Spoils of War – Loot Train Attack

Dom Hellier

Thijs Noij

Edwin Holdsworth

Giacomo Matteucci

 

Star Trek: Discovery

Phil Prates

Rex Alerta

John Dinh

Karen Cheng

 

Outstanding Compositing in a Photoreal Commercial

 

Destiny 2: New Legends Will Rise

Alex Unruh

Michael Ralla

Helgi Laxdal

Timothy Gutierrez

 

Nespresso: Comin’ Home

Matt Pascuzzi

Steve Drew

Martin Lazaro

Karch Koon

 

Samsung: Do What You Can’t – Ostrich

Michael Gregory

Andrew Roberts

Gustavo Bellon

Rashabh Ramesh Butani

 

Virgin Media: Delivering Awesome

Jonathan Westley

John Thornton

Milo Paterson

George Cressey

 

Outstanding Visual Effects in a Student Project

 

Creature Pinup

Christian Leitner

Juliane Walther

Kiril Mirkov

Lisa Ecker

 

Hybrids

Florian Brauch

Romain Thirion

Matthieu Pujol

Kim Tailhades

 

Les Pionniers de l’Univers

Clementine Courbin

Matthieu Guevel

Jérôme Van Beneden

Anthony Rege

 

The Endless

Nicolas Lourme

Corentin Gravend

Edouard Calemard

Romaric Vivier

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Naomi Goldman

Principal
NLG Communications
Office: 424-293-2113

Cell: 310-770-2765

ngoldman77@gmail.com

 

LinkedIn Profile

 

Behind the Title: Whitehouse editor David Cea

NAME: David Cea

COMPANY: Whitehouse Post in New York

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
Originally, we were an editorial shop that has grown into a one-stop shop for all things post production.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Editor

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
Being the one responsible for expressing the creative vision in filmmaking. The film editor takes all of the hard work and ideas and gives it shape and form for the world to see.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
The human component. I find a large part of what I do is making my clients feel comfortable. Filmmaking is a tough and sometimes exhausting process. Just shy of the finish line is where I come in. I want to be the one that helps relieve some of the stress from the process. As a former bartender, I learned how to be a pseudo-therapist. Keeping everyone positive and showing them that all of their work will lead to a great end-product is important.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
Creative problem solving. Inevitably there will be a missed shot or last-minute client ask that seems impossible. Finding a way to fix it with what I have in front of me keeps things interesting.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
Second guessing. When anyone on the creative team, myself included, begins to doubt their instincts, I feel the end product starts to suffer.

WHAT IS YOUR MOST PRODUCTIVE TIME OF THE DAY?
5:30pm… much to my wife’s chagrin.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
In an ideal world, a surf instructor in Costa Rica.

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
In college I knew I wanted to work in the film industry in some capacity. I took an editing class and was sold from there. Editing also seemed to be the sanest leg of the process.

Target

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
Target’s fashion forward rebranding campaign
– A short film for Mercedes featuring Mariel Hemingway and her daughter Langley Fox
– A skate film for the Loke app launching soon

YOU HAVE WORKED ON ALL SORTS OF PROJECTS. DO YOU PUT ON A DIFFERENT HAT WHEN CUTTING FOR A SPECIFIC GENRE?
I certainly have to place myself in the right mood when cutting each specific genre. It may be a certain type of music during the selection process or watching the works of the masters of the field to gain inspiration. I try to put myself in the director’s shoes: “Why was this shot done this way? What is the broad feeling he or she is trying to achieve?”

While I do get into a different headspace when cutting different genres, I definitely borrow from each style no matter the project. Not being married to a specific genre is key to keeping me engaged and making for a more well rounded end product.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
The Jeep 4×4 Ever Super Bowl spot. This a spot that went through a several evolutions until it was the final piece that won the big game spot for FCA Chrysler that year.

Ford

WHAT DO YOU USE TO EDIT?
Avid Media Composer

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE PLUGIN?
Waves Pitch Shift. It will make even the dullest scratch VO talent sound like Sam Elliot.

ARE YOU OFTEN ASKED TO DO MORE THAN EDIT? IF SO, WHAT ELSE ARE YOU ASKED TO DO?
Yes. Many projects you see coming through the door nowadays are comprised of found footage. Sometimes all we get is a script. This is sometimes fun because we are then in essence put in more of a directorial role.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
– Wireless silent mouse — Since I don’t use Wacom tablets to edit, this is key to not drive the people in the room nuts with constant clicking
– Noise-cancelling headphones — the streets of NYC become downright pleasant when wearing them, smells aside
– Swell bottle — that’s technology, right?

DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
Plenty of screen-free time with the family.

Directing: My Top 10 career-ending mistakes

By Trevor McMahan

Okay, so this is probably a really bad idea… but I’m about to list the biggest mistakes I’ve ever made as a director. It’s ironic, because when I told my super-rep Susanne I was going to write a tips piece for postPerspective, she was all like, “Yeah, this will be a great opportunity for people to see what smart/insightful/great/awesome director you are!” So much for that plan.

The silver lining is that none of the following career-ending mistakes has actually ended my career, and even though it may sound like it here, I’m not ALWAYS making career-ending mistakes – just sometimes. And I’m lucky to be busy enough to provide myself ample opportunities to make them, which means I must be doing something right. Right?

Anyhow, here goes. I hope you enjoy these mistakes more than I did!

1. Thinking a mistake could be career ending
Boom. I could end the list here and I’d feel like it was worth it because this mistake is the greatest mistake of all. To be clear, there are, of course, massive mistakes one could make to actually bring your career to a halt, but most of us simply aren’t making those.

Once I freed myself of the fear of making mistakes, I was able to produce more creative work, to explore ideas and shots and scenes in more unexpected ways and generally push toward stronger storytelling. And when you inevitably do make a mistake, use that experience as a reminder that there’s always a better way to do something — it’s an incredible way to grow and learn and push forward. And if my words don’t ring true here, take it from the really cheesy motivational poster of mossy boulders dotting through a pond that declares, “Mistakes are the stepping stones to success.” Sage advice from the fantastic folks over at Successories.

2. Thinking one not-great project spells T-h-e  E-n-d
One “miss” used to feel like it was a death knell, so I avoided “missing” at all costs, and missed a handful of solid opportunities in the meantime. But I quickly realized just how much growth and learning can come from even the least expected places. I’ve swung to the opposite end of the spectrum – eager to shoot and learn and improve as much as I can. Some of the best work I’ve done has come as a result of those opportunities and relationships, and while not every project is going to be a grand slam, you’ve got to swing.

3. Aiming for perfection
There’s nothing worse than pressure associated with targeting perfection, and it has led to moments where a scene just doesn’t feel believable or a project falls flat and predictable. I’ve since learned to embrace the process of discovery and it has made for an incredibly expansive process. I even like to work with creatives and crew to embed a sense of imperfection and idiosyncrasy into our filmmaking — from little imperfect reflections of light and little flaws in the production design to wardrobe that feels unplanned and actors’ performances that feel unrehearsed. It’s when things start to feel like they’ve not been designed that I start to believe them.

4. Thinking an agency’s storyboards are what they want the commercial to look like
There are so many reasons agency boards look the way they do, but what they aren’t is a blueprint of the only predetermined way to tell a story or film sequence. But that didn’t stop me from leaning too heavily on them, and ending up in an excruciatingly awkward series of conversations about why I made those choices. Them wondering why I’d locked into their boarded angles, and me not really having a reason behind the choices. The aim, I’ve found, is to see the idea through the client-friendly illustrations — to “read between the boards” and gauge where a campaign wants to go. Once you have that core, translating it into shots becomes something you can stand behind.

5. Telling an agency what they want to hear
Tell the agency exactly what you think they want to hear to land a job? Wrong. Regurgitating an agency call in a treatment, or pitching them a film they’d already pitched me, just doesn’t win the job. I take great pride, now, in not going into a pitch aiming to win it, but aiming to make the film the best it can be (with the belief, of course, that they’ll agree). The most “creative” creatives I’ve met and worked with over the years have proved quite keen to be challenged and to be shown where and how the work can improve. It’s important to work with collaborators who are aiming for great, not just good enough. Architect Daniel Burnham said, “Make no little plans, they have no magic to stir men’s blood.” I couldn’t have said it better.

6. Pushing way too far
Yep, guilty of that, too. And believe me, it’s not pretty. If you do push to far, those treatments end up in the bottom drawer.

7. Not listening
With all that said… it can be tempting to go whole hog in a particular direction, and I have! But if that’s not the direction they’re headed, there’s only pain and anguish. So, really listening and hearing out an agency and client is invaluable to unearthing the reason they’re spending all this money, and how to best direct those resources.

8. Thinking I needed to do other people’s jobs
In my mind, there used to be an expectation that the director should know (and often do) all. But to be honest, I found that I’d get stretched thin dealing with budget issues, wrinkles in the calendar or the how the on-set effects team was working out a rig… and to a degree that the storytelling would suffer. I still am involved with all of those things (and always will be), but I do find relief realizing I’m working with an incredible crew of filmmakers and craftsmen, who kick ass at their jobs and whose art I respect. Simply letting them do their jobs, then, frees me up to do mine — part of which is to bug them about their work. So, I probably didn’t lay off long, but it’s a start. Baby steps.

9. Waiting around for boards
Waiting around for boards won’t help more boards to come in, and I’ve never felt so close to the guillotine than when I was just waiting. As soon as I stopped waiting and started producing — shorts, music videos, even video tests and experiments, all of a sudden I was busier than ever. Work certainly begets work, and the more you do the more will come.

10. Writing an article about all the worst mistakes I ever made
Then there was that one. Let’s hope it’s not the last.


Trevor McMahan is a director at Rocket Film. This commercial and film production house has offices in New York and Los Angeles.

Editor Chrissy Rabe joins BlueRock

New York-based creative editorial company BlueRock has added Chrissy Rabe as editor. Prior to joining BlueRock, she worked for Box Motion and Gloss VFX, collaborating with clients such as Nike, Prada, Calvin Klein, Louis Vuitton, Godiva, Harley Davidson, Zara, Gap, Sephora and MAC Cosmetics. Rabe also cut the Lane Bryant This Body campaign for Laird and Partners.

A Texas native, Rabe started in the business as a model at age 14. From there she went on to become a producer and photography manager before finding her way to editing. She says that modeling taught her “to not take things too personally” and how to work with a variety of personalities. As a producer and photography manager, Rabe learned to be extremely organized. “I would scour through thousands of photos to make selects to send onto the client,” she says, “which was ideal training for my future as an editor.”

“Chrissy’s unique style is reflected in the way she creates, allowing the viewer to feel pure emotional reactions while watching her pieces,” says BlueRock executive producer/managing director Courtney Ryan Law. “She is able to seamlessly blend genres, knowing just how to achieve the perfect shot at the perfect moment. That’s the beauty of her editing, and what makes her such a valuable addition to our roster.”