Author Archives: Dayna McCallum

Quantum shipping StorNext 5.4

Quantum has introduced StorNext 5.4, the latest release of their workflow storage platform, designed to bring efficiency and flexibility to media content management. StorNext 5.4 enhancements include the ability to integrate existing public cloud storage accounts and third-party object storage (private cloud) — including Amazon Web Services, Microsoft Azure, Google Cloud, NetApp StorageGRID, IBM Cleversafe and Scality Ring — as archive tiers in a StorNext-managed media environment. It also lets users deploy applications embedded within StorNext-powered Xcellis workflow storage appliances.

Quantum has also included a new feature called StorNext Storage Manager, offering automated, policy-based movement of content into and out of users’ existing public and private clouds while maintaining the visibility and access that StorNext provides. It offers seamless integration for public and private clouds within a StorNext-managed environment — as well as primary disk and tape storage tiers, full user and application access to media stored in the cloud without additional hardware or software, and extended versioning across sites and the cloud.

By enabling applications to run inside its Xcellis Workflow Director, the new Dynamic Application Environment (DAE) capability in StorNext 5.4 allows users to leverage a converged storage architecture, reducing the time, cost and complexity of deploying and maintaining applications.

StorNext 5.4 is currently shipping with all newly-purchased Xcellis, StorNext M-Series and StorNext Pro Solutions, as well as Artico archive appliances. It is available at no additional cost for StorNext 5 users under current support contracts.

Quick Chat: Monkeyland Audio’s Trip Brock

By Dayna McCallum

Monkeyland Audio recently expanded its facility, including a new Dolby Atmos equipped mixing stage. The Glendale-based Monkeyland Audio, where fluorescent lights are not allowed and creative expression is always encouraged, now offers three mixing stages, an ADR/Foley stage and six editorial suites.

Trip Brock, the owner of Monkeyland, opened the facility over 10 years ago, but the MPSE Golden Reel Award-winning supervising sound editor and mixer (All the Wilderness), started out in the business more than 23 years ago. We reached out to Brock to find out more about the expansion and where the name Monkeyland came from in the first place…

monkeyland audioOne of your two new stages is Dolby Atmos certified. Why was that important for your business?
We really believe in the Dolby Atmos format and feel it has a lot of growth potential in both the theatrical and television markets. We purpose-built our Atmos stage looking towards the future, giving our independent and studio clients a less expensive, yet completely state-of-the-art alternative to the Atmos stages found on the studio lots.

Can you talk specifically about the gear you are using on the new stages?
All of our stages are running the latest Avid Pro Tools HD 12 software across multiple Mac Pros with Avid HDX hardware. Our 7.1 mixing stage, Reposado, is based around an Avid Icon D-Control console, and Anejo, our Atmos stage, is equipped with dual 24-fader Avid S6 M40 consoles. Monitoring on Anejo is based on a 3-way JBL theatrical system, with 30 channels of discrete Crown DCi amplification, BSS processing and the DAD AX32 front end.

You’ve been in this business for over 23 years. How does that experience color the way you run your shop?
I stumbled into the post sound business coming from a music background, and immediately fell in love with the entire process. After all these years, having worked with and learned so much from so many talented clients and colleagues, I still love what I do and look forward to every day at the office. That’s what I look for and try to cultivate in my creative team — the passion for what we do. There are so many aspects and nuances in the audio post world, and I try to express that to my team — explore all the different areas of our profession, find which role really speaks to you and then embrace it!

You’ve got 10 artists on staff. Why is it important to you to employ a full team of talent, and how do you see that benefiting your clients?
I started Monkeyland as primarily a sound editorial company. Back in the day, this was much more common than the all-inclusive, independent post sound outfits offering ADR, Foley and mixing, which are more common today. The sound editorial crew always worked together in house as a team, which is a theme I’ve always felt was important to maintain as our company made the switch into full service. To us, keeping the team intact and working together at the same location allows for a lot more creative collaboration and synergy than say a set of editors all working by themselves remotely. Having staff in house also allows us flexibility when last minute changes are thrown our way. We are better able to work and communicate as a team, which leads to a superior end product for our clients.

Monkeyland AudioCan you name some of the projects you are working on and what you are doing for them?
We are currently mixing a film called The King’s Daughter, starring Pierce Brosnan and William Hurt. We also recently completed full sound design and editorial, as well as the native Atmos mix, on a new post-apocalyptic feature we are really proud of called The Worthy. Other recent editorial and mixing projects include the latest feature from Director Alan Rudolph, Ray Meets Helen, the 10-episode series Junior for director Zoe Cassavetes, and Three Days To Live, a new eight-episode true-crime series for NBC/Universal.

Most of your stage names are related to tequila… Why is that?
Haha — this is kind of a take-off from the naming of the company itself. When I was looking for a company name, I knew I didn’t want it to include the word “digital” or have any hint toward technology, which seemed to be the norm at the time. A friend in college used to tease me about my “unique” major in audio production, saying stuff like, “What kind of a degree is that? A monkey could be trained to do that.” Thus Monkeyland was born!

Same theory applied to our stage names. When we built the new stages and needed to name them, I knew I didn’t want to go with the traditional stage “A, B, C” or “1, 2, 3,” so we decided on tequila types — Anejo, Reposado, Plata, even Mezcal. It seems to fit our personality better, and who doesn’t like a good margarita after a great mix!